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Articles of Faith: Religion, Secularism, and the Indian Supreme Court (Law in India) download epub

by Ronojoy Sen


Epub Book: 1539 kb. | Fb2 Book: 1571 kb.

Request PDF On Mar 1, 2013, Ratna Kapur and others published Ronojoy Sen, Articles of Faith: Religion .

This article concerns two seemingly antagonistic Court decisions- Sante Fe Independent School District v. Jane Doe, 13 Fla. Law. W. Fed. S425; and Adler v. Duval County School Board, 13 Fla. C460. While the Sante Fe decision struck down a school prayer school board policy, the Duval County decision allowed such policy. The authors seek to reconcile these two court decisions and offer.

New Delhi: Oxford University Press, 2012. Nor is it a book merely for specialists, for at stake is the role of religion in modern India from one point of view, or the nature of Indian secularism from another. The selection of the judgments of the Supreme Court to shed light on these issues is justified by the fact that, unlike the debates in intellectual and political circles on these issues which might be termed descriptive, the rulings of the Supreme Court are prescriptive in nature and therefore shape the very nature of what concepts like secularism, religious reform and religious freedom.

This pioneering book analyses India’s approach to secular governance in light of the judgments delivered by the Indian Supreme Court. It focuses specifically on the Supreme Court’s interpretation of the constitutional right to freedom of religion and its influence on the discourse of secularism and nationalism.

Articles of Faith book. This book examines the relationship of religion and the Indian state and seeks to answer the question: 'How has the higher judiciary in Independent India interpreted the right to freedom of religion and in turn influenced the discourse on secularism and nationhood?'

Sen’s discussion of these cases and the relevant literature is fair-minded.

By Ronojoy Sen. Oxford University Press Pages: 280 Rs: 675. This book is a clear, concise documentation of the argument that the Indian state, through law, actively shapes and transforms religion. Secularism, in this sense, is not disengagement from religion; nor does it mean equal respect for religion. The distinction between the religious and secular is not a self-evident distinction. Sen’s discussion of these cases and the relevant literature is fair-minded. In a book that covers a vast range of cases, it would be churlish to ask for more. But it would have been wonderful if the author had pursued his theoretical insights to their logical conclusion by pursuing two themes.

See Sen, Ronojoy, Articles of Faith: Religion, Secularism and the Indian Supreme Court (OUP 2010); Sen, Ronojoy, Legalizing Religion: The Indian Supreme Court and Secularism (East-West Center 2007); Sen, Ronojoy, ‘The Indian Supreme Court and the quest for a rational Hinduism’ (2010) 1(1) South Asian History and Culture 86. 17. Sen, Articles of Faith (n 16) ch 7. 18. Sen, Legalizing Religion (n 16) 6–7. 19. ibid 11–29.

This study addresses constitutional secularism in India by examining the relationship of one agency . Related books and articles.

This study addresses constitutional secularism in India by examining the relationship of one agency of the state-the Supreme Court-to secularism. The Supreme Court is, of course, one among several sites where the contestation over secularism is played out. This monograph examines how the Supreme Court defines and demarcates religion, religious practice, religious organizations, and religious freedom. On the basis of the Supreme Court rulings, the study argues, the Indian state has pushed its reformist agenda at the expense of religious freedom and neutrality. There are two broad claims made in this study.

Ronojoy Sen. This book examines the relationship of religion and the Indian state and seeks to answer the question: 'How has the higher judiciary in Independent India interpreted the right to freedom of religion and in turn influenced the discou. This book examines the relationship of religion and the Indian state and seeks to answer the question: 'How has the higher judiciary in Independent India interpreted the right to freedom of religion and in turn influenced the discourse on secularism and nationhood?'. The author examines the tension between judgments that attempt to define the essence of religion and in many ways to 'rationalize' it, and a society where religion occupies a prominent space. He places the judicial discourse within the wider political and philosophical context of Indian secularism.

Religion in India India is a country of religious diversity and religious tolerance is established in both law and custom. Throughout the history of India, religion has been an important part of the country's culture. A vast majority of Indians associate themselves with a religion

Religion in India India is a country of religious diversity and religious tolerance is established in both law and custom. A vast majority of Indians associate themselves with a religion. The second largest religion is Islam, at about 1. % of the population. The third largest religion is Christianity at . %. The fourth largest religion is Sikhism at about . % of India's population.

This book examines the relationship of religion and the Indian state and seeks to answer the question: 'How has the higher judiciary in independent India interpreted the right to freedom of religion and in turn influenced the discourse on secularism and nationhood?' The SCI has entered into many debates and controversies regarding religious doctrines. The author examines the tension between judgments that attempt to define the essence of religion and in many ways to 'rationalize' it, and a society where religion occupies a prominent space. He places the judicial discourse within the wider political and philosophical context of Indian secularism. Apart from Articles 25 and 26 of the Constitution of India the author focuses on judgments and rulings on Article 44, under the Directive Principles of State Policy, which places a duty on the state to 'secure' a uniform civil code for the nation. His contention is that the Indian Supreme Court has actively aimed at reform and rationalization of obscurantist religious views and institutions and has as a result contributed to a 'homogenization of religion' and also the nation, that it has not shown adequate sensitivity to the pluralism of Indian polity and the rights of minorities. The book explores the tension inherent for the Indian state in the parallel tasks of practicing religious evenhandedness on one hand and introducing reform on the other. It covers judgments from the entire five and a half decades of the Court's existence.
Articles of Faith: Religion, Secularism, and the Indian Supreme Court (Law in India) download epub
Constitutional Law
Author: Ronojoy Sen
ISBN: 0198063806
Category: Law
Subcategory: Constitutional Law
Language: English
Publisher: Oxford University Press; 1 edition (March 1, 2010)
Pages: 248 pages