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When Brute Force Fails: How to Have Less Crime and Less Punishment download epub

by Mark A. R. Kleiman


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When Brute Force Fails explains how we got into the current trap and how we can get out of it: to cut both crime and the . Brute-force crime control has been a costly mistake, both socially and financially

When Brute Force Fails explains how we got into the current trap and how we can get out of it: to cut both crime and the prison population in half within a decade. Mark Kleiman demonstrates that simply locking up more people for lengthier terms is no longer a workable crime-control strategy. Brute-force crime control has been a costly mistake, both socially and financially. Now that we know how to do better, it would be immoral not to put that knowledge to work. Скачать (pdf, . 7 Mb) Читать. Epub FB2 mobi txt RTF.

When Brute Force Fails explains how we got into the current trap and how we can get out of it: to cut both crime and the prison population in half within a decade.

Personal Name: Kleiman, Mark. Publication, Distribution, et. Princeton The trap Thinking about crime control Hope Tipping, dynamic concentration, and the logic of deterrence Crime despite punishment Designing enforcement strategies Crime control without punishment Guns and gun control Drug policy for crime control What could go wrong? An agenda for crime control.

When Brute Force Fails: How to Have Less Crime and Less Punishment. by Mark A. R. Kleiman. Since the crime explosion of the 1960s, the prison population in the United States has multiplied fivefold, to one prisoner for every hundred adults-a rate unprecedented in American history and unmatched anywhere in the world. Even as the prisoner head count continues to rise, crime has stopped falling, and poor people and minorities still bear the brunt of both crime and punishment.

In When Brute Force Fails he extends his reach to develop a more sensible system of criminal justice. Mark Kleiman shows how, by being clever rather than vindictive, we can have much less of both than anyone thought possible. The book is imaginative, thorough, and readable. It will make a difference in public policy. -Peter Reuter, University of Maryland. -Michael O'Hare, University of California, Berkeley. This is a terrific book on crime control, one that will inform experts and laypeople alike.

When Brute Force Fails book.

When Brute Force Fails, Kleiman argues that such capricious enforcement undermines efforts to reduce crime, and moreover that tough penalties-such as the long sentences that have contributed to clogged prisons-don't do much to help, despite their high cost.

Since the crime explosion of the 1960s, the prison population in the United States has multiplied fivefold, to one prisoner for every hundred adults--a rate unprecedented in American history and unmatched anywhere in the world. Even as the prisoner head count continues to rise, crime has stopped falling, and poor people and minorities still bear the brunt of both crime and punishment. When Brute Force Fails explains how we got into the current trap and how we can get out of it: to cut both crime and the prison population in half within a decade.

Mark Kleiman demonstrates that simply locking up more people for lengthier terms is no longer a workable crime-control strategy. But, says Kleiman, there has been a revolution--largely unnoticed by the press--in controlling crime by means other than brute-force incarceration: substituting swiftness and certainty of punishment for randomized severity, concentrating enforcement resources rather than dispersing them, communicating specific threats of punishment to specific offenders, and enforcing probation and parole conditions to make community corrections a genuine alternative to incarceration. As Kleiman shows, "zero tolerance" is nonsense: there are always more offenses than there is punishment capacity. But, it is possible--and essential--to create focused zero tolerance, by clearly specifying the rules and then delivering the promised sanctions every time the rules are broken.

Brute-force crime control has been a costly mistake, both socially and financially. Now that we know how to do better, it would be immoral not to put that knowledge to work.


Comments: (7)

Vivados
Mark discusses how to improve our crime control policies by shifting from raw punishment to more intelligent methods and the obstacles that make it difficult. The basic idea is to concentrate efforts on high risk individuals. The most original ones are investing in parenting education and making post-release well being of prisoners a performance criteria of prison wardens.
Lianeni
I am a circuit judge and I study and research the most effective ways to sentence an offender. The goals are first to punish for breaking the law, then restitution for the victim, and finally to rehabilitate the person. The research in this book helps in all those things. The public should also read it to better understand crime and punishment.
Thofyn
This is a clear, informative and realistic assessment of the public policy challenges posed by the American criminal justice system. The jewel at the center of Kleiman's book is the premise that the goal of crime reduction is compatible with a diminution of suffering at all organizational levels, including enforcement and punishment. It's the kind of book that one dearly hopes that our political class might actually read.
JOGETIME
Professor Kleiman employs psychology, economics, game theory, and real-world examples to explain why harsher punishments are often less effective at controlling the behavior of criminals than targeted, swift and certain punishments. He persuasively argues that we can significantly reduce crime and punishment (particularly punishment of the prison incarceration variety) by focusing enforcement resources to make the threat of getting caught and going to jail a real threat thereby reducing the costs on society of crime, punishment, and the steps taken by law-abiding citizens to protect themselves from crime. A thoroughly enlightening read, When Brute Force Fails forced me to think about the costs to society crime causes in a way I had never considered before (the price you pay for gas at the pump would likely be less if you didn't have to drive to your job from your home in the suburbs every day. A home you likely own because it is too dangerous to live in the city and the crumbling infrastructure is no place you want to raise your children.) A must read for policy makers and concerned citizens alike.
Throw her heart
I'm not completely finished reading it yet, but so far it is excellent. Very insightful, and full of useful data and anecdotes to help clarify the arguments being made. Also very readable, which is nice for public policy/social science work.
Gorisar
I've been following Mark Kleiman's research and writing for many years. We are occasional collaborators. When Brute Force Fails illustrates many qualities that make Kleiman one of the nation's leading drug policy researchers. Across the political spectrum, millions of Americans have recognized that brute force has imposed unacceptably high human costs while failing to address the economic, social, and public health harms associated with substance misuse. Gracefully-written, grounded in the available research, chastened by practical experience in this difficult area, this book provides a superb guide to a more humane and effective approach.

Harold Pollack
University of Chicago
Ynap
This is the best book about crime. It is short and very clear. Mark Kleiman's ideas are creative and intelligent.
This very well written and researched book on crime prevention demonstrates the importance of thinking outside the box when addressing the problems of crime prevention. Short and certain sentences for things like drug offenses appear to work a lot better than harsh parole revocations at reducing the rate of recidivism. Mark Kleiman's analytical skills and years of experience in this field make this book well worth reading for anyone interested in crime and its prevention.
When Brute Force Fails: How to Have Less Crime and Less Punishment download epub
Criminal Law
Author: Mark A. R. Kleiman
ISBN: 0691148643
Category: Law
Subcategory: Criminal Law
Language: English
Publisher: Princeton University Press; Reprint edition (August 1, 2010)
Pages: 256 pages