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NOLO's IEP Guide: Learning Disabilities download epub

by Lawrence Siegel Attorney


Epub Book: 1111 kb. | Fb2 Book: 1298 kb.

Siegel, a special education attorney and advocate, helps parents advocate for children with learning disabilities and understand .

Siegel, a special education attorney and advocate, helps parents advocate for children with learning disabilities and understand the individualized education program (IEP) process. It gives parents the step-by-step instructions they need to navigate the complicated process of creating and maintaining an Individualized Educational Program (IEP) for their child with a learning disability, teaching parents how to advocate for their child's education.

Create an individualized education plan (IEP) and secure the education your child deserves! Children with learning disabilities have different needs than other kids in special education - let Nolo's IEP Guide: Learning Disabilities help you work with your child's school to make sure those.

This book teaches you to: identify a learning disability.

Many children have learning disabilities-and it’s up to parents and schools to work together to ensure that each child’s unique educational needs are met. But what if the school disagrees with your goals for your child? You are at a disadvantage if you don’t know the law. This book teaches you to: identify a learning disability. understand your child's rights to education. untangle eligibility rules and evaluations. prepare and make your best case to school administrators. develop IEP goals and advocate for their adoption, explore and choose the best programs and services.

Let The Complete IEP Guide guide you through this complex process with vital information, strategies, and the .

Let The Complete IEP Guide guide you through this complex process with vital information, strategies, and the encouragement you need to secure your child's education. Get everything you need to: understand your child's rights. Lawrence Siegel has been a Special Education Attorney and Advocate since 1979, and has represented children with disabilities extensively in IEPs, due process, complaints, legal action and before legislative and policy bodies. Mr. Siegel has lectured and consulted with advocacy and parent groups throughout the country and is a member of the California Advisory Commission on Special Education.

Items related to Nolo's IEP Guide: Learning Disabilities. Lawrence Siegel Attorney Nolo's IEP Guide: Learning Disabilities. ISBN 13: 9781413313239. Nolo's IEP Guide: Learning Disabilities. Lawrence Siegel Attorney.

This book helps you learn what services your child is entitled to so you can make sure the school district provides it. Parenting Kids. To read this book, upload an EPUB or FB2 file to Bookmate.

Lawrence Siegel has been a Special Education Attorney and Advocate since 1979, and has represented children with disabilities extensively in IEPs, due process, complaints, legal action .

Lawrence Siegel has been a Special Education Attorney and Advocate since 1979, and has represented children with disabilities extensively in IEPs, due process, complaints, legal action and before legislative and policy bodies. Siegel has lectured and consulted with advocacy and parent groups throughout the country. He has written special education legislation that has been adopted in several states. How to advocate for your child's education. Many children have learning disabilities-and it’s up to parents and schools to work together to ensure that each child’s unique educational needs are met.

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Create an individualized education plan (IEP) and secure the education your child .

Create an individualized education plan (IEP) and secure the education your child deserves! Children with learning disabilities have different needs than other kids in special education -- let Nolo's IEP Guide: Learning Disabilities help you make sure those needs are met. This one-of-a-kind book walks you through the Individual Education Program process, providing all the instructions, suggestions, resources and forms you'll need to understand the special-education system. Step by step, you'll learn how to: understand your child's rights prepare to make your case untangle eligibility rules and evaluations develop effective IEP goals figure out the best programs, services and teaching strategies get ready for IEP meetings resolve disputes with the school district do legal research on learning-disability issues The 4th edition is completely updated to reflect the latest -- and major -- changes to the Individuals With Disabilities Education Act (IDEA), the law that governs special education and the IEP process. You'll also get the updated forms, sample letters and resources you need to make the right plan for your child.

Comments: (7)

Itiannta
A must have for anyone navigating the special education system.
Murn
Awesome........This is a must have for "All" parents and those in the educational field. The condition of the product was just like new. Thanks....
Twentyfirstfinger
This book is informative, easy to read for a law book, and has tear out forms that you can use. Any parent with a special needs child in public school should read this book to make sure their child is being treated fairly and their IEP is being carried out the way YOU want it!!!
Dagdatus
excellent book with different perspectives. Gave me many new things I was not familiar with. Be careful when writing letters to schools that they are not too wordy or sound like you are in confrontation.
Otrytrerl
This book is helpful in gaining more knowledge about LD and IEPs. Unfortunately not all public school have read this book or care to follow the suggestions in it. Wish they did.

A good book for parents new to the daunting task of advocating for their child's FAPE.
Beazerdred
I got this book after using "NOLO's IEP guide : how to advocate for your Special Ed Child" during the process of amending and rewriting my son's IEP. I found that guide to be immensely helpful and have reviewed it on Amazon as well. It was a lifesaver where my child is concerned.

The IEP process is unnecessarily complicated, full of loopholes and a minefield for unsuspecting parents. I am sure that there are many administrators who will fight for what your child needs but in this economy, most of them have their hands tied by budget needs and the needs of the individual often fall by the wayside. This book can be an invaluable guide and resource in your advocacy for your child. It provides the sections of the law that safeguard your child's needs, how to fight when the law is not being followed, how to approach an IEP meeting, document conversations in case you need them for legal recourse, forms to use in communicating with a school when things are getting ugly, what to expect in the IEP and so much more that can help you keep your cool in a very daunting and often heartbreaking process.

But is this book necessarily any better than the other guide?? Would you be better off buying both versions? I don't think so. The "Learning disabilities" version is almost exactly the same as the other guide except for chapter 3 - "What is a learning disability". It includes the Legal Definitions, scientific definitions and signs of a learning disability.

Other books cover that section in much more detail than the scant 37 pages in this book. so, While this is an exceptional resource it is mostly a slightly rearranged version of "The complete IEP guide: How to advocate for your Special Ed Child". I would get either one - they are both excellent - but don't bother getting both.
Ranterl
It's nice to know that some parents and psychologists benefited from this book. We always cheer parents who prevail at their Boards of Education, advocating to meet the special needs of their child. But I must agree with the experienced BookMan on the insufficient content of this particular volume.

Our family is long past fighting our Board over our child's need of special services. But in the early years of the long battle, we had more than our share of disputes on that topic, and later, on whether unilateral placements were appropriate. It required fierce advocacy. And most parents arrive at the table totally unprepared, as did we.

We did better than most. We hired a first rate attorney, and supplemented her efforts with my excellent research skills --- on many related subjects, including but not limited to federal and state laws, appropriate placement, various additional diagnoses gradually added, and the best means of treating them. ADHD was just the first, and later proved the least of the problems, which surfaced in greater number in middle school and after. According to several experts whom we consulted, this is extremely common. Our attorney advised me, I'd be a superb teacher of other parents facing the utterly daunting task of educating a special needs kid. But it was not fun.

We prevailed at two impartial hearings, and successfully negotiated, avoiding a third. More recent IEP reviews and placements have been easier. Not easy at all, but considerably less taxing, since all on our special education committee team fully agree on the central learning issues at hand.

Concerning the deficiencies of this book, I refer readers to the superb, above-noted review by BookMan. He is extremely well-educated, so I presume him to be a special education attorney or person in a related capacity.

Over time, what most discouraged us were the collective official efforts and sums of taxpayer money wasted disputing the needs of special children and opposing those hard-to-find placements that can and do provide "free and appropriate" education, as required under federal law. The authorities disputed the first Carter-funded placement we located, for example, with a claim that none was required.

Most often, officials offered no placement at all. We were forced to find schools, on our own. They disputed all but two. Even those, they approved only after losing the first year. Until recently, we received only one offer, at a horrendous facility. We then bore the burden of proving it inappropriate. Easily accessible reasons abounded in public records and news reports. But few would have known how to proceed or as thoroughly collected the data necessary to trounce the opposing parties. (Next we needed to prove the appropriateness of the facility we chose 15 months earlier, when officials had failed to reply to desperate pleas for suggestions. We had then received only dead silence.)

Miraculously, public school officials recently offered a genuinely "free and appropriate" placement --- an exceedingly excellent one --- but not until we had cleared innumerable obstacles and hurdles. And we needed to clear some of those hurdles again during the following annual IEP review process.

Such experiences create incalculable angst for parents and students alike. We're certainly not alone. With unending thanks to Heaven, we had sufficient skills, knowledge and resources to cope.

Especially during economically difficult times, localities pay attorneys to fight parents, rather than fund better special needs accommodations and schools as required by federal and most states' laws.

Rarely if ever figured in public cost equations are the enormously expensive back-end consequences of not properly educating these kids. Since U.S. prisons are filled with young "special" people whose needs were never, or not properly addressed, we know for a fact that the vast majority of parents, especially disadvantaged and low-income single-parents, cannot successfully contend with everything thrown at them in cases that "go sour," if they ever even get to a committee on special education.

Moreover, the incarceration rate as a percentage of the general population is reportedly higher in the U.S. than any other Western nation. With this statistic in mind, special education budgets nationwide should be pointed in a different direction --- filling kids' needs, not fighting parents so as not to fill them.

In conclusion, ours is only one example to parents starting to march up the learning curve. Arm yourselves extremely well. Get as much information as possible. Especially, reach out to parent advocacy groups or agencies addressing the needs of adopted and special needs children. It IS possible to buck the system without hiring expensive legal assistance, although I personally know of only one parent who did, for his child with Asperger's Syndrome. He was diligent and dogged, and that case was fairly straight forward.

That said, parents who refuse to give up can definitely obtain help and hope. It can be done. Don't give up.

Unfortunately, however, I must again agree with BookMan that while this book contains much valuable information, it only addresses the proverbial tip of the iceberg.
NOLO's IEP Guide: Learning Disabilities download epub
Specialties
Author: Lawrence Siegel Attorney
ISBN: 1413309399
Category: Law
Subcategory: Specialties
Language: English
Publisher: NOLO; 4 edition (April 7, 2009)
Pages: 410 pages