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The Desert Spear: Book Two of The Demon Cycle download epub

by Peter V. Brett


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The Desert Spear: Book T. The novels in the series are The Warded Man, The Desert Spear, The Daylight War, The Skull Throne, and The Core. He spends too much time on the Internet, but occasionally unplugs to practice kickboxing and dad fu. He lives in Manhattan.

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Электронная книга "The Desert Spear: Book Two of The Demon Cycle", Peter V. Brett

Электронная книга "The Desert Spear: Book Two of The Demon Cycle", Peter V. Brett. Эту книгу можно прочитать в Google Play Книгах на компьютере, а также на устройствах Android и iOS. Выделяйте текст, добавляйте закладки и делайте заметки, скачав книгу "The Desert Spear: Book Two of The Demon Cycle" для чтения в офлайн-режиме.

BONUS: Now with twenty pages of bonus material, including an exclusive interview with Peter V. Brett, and an excerpt from Peter V. Brett's The Daylight Wa. he sun is setting on humanity. The night now belongs to voracious demons that prey upon a dwindling population forced to cower behind half-forgotten symbols of power. Legends tell of a Deliverer: a general who once bound all mankind into a single force that defeated the demons.

Author : Peter V. The night now belongs to voracious demons that arise as the sun sets, preying upon a dwindling population forced to cower behind ancient and half-forgotten symbols of power

Author : Peter V. The night now belongs to voracious demons that arise as the sun sets, preying upon a dwindling population forced to cower behind ancient and half-forgotten symbols of power. These wards alone can keep the demons at bay, but legends tell of a Deliverer: a general-some would say prophet-who once bound all mankind into a single force that defeated the demons. Those times, if they ever existed, are long past. The demons are back, and the return of the Deliverer is just another myth.

April 2010 : UK Paperback.

The Desert Spear First published in Great Britain by HarperVoyager 2010. Peter V. Brett asserts the moral right to be identified as the author of this work. To the children, and some of the adults, the Jongleur was the more important of the two. For as long as Arlen could remember, it had been the same man, grey-haired but spry and full of cheer. This new one was younger, and he seemed sullen.

He is the author of the Demon Cycle, whose . In The Desert Spear two men are claimed by their own followers to be humanity's prophesied Deliverer.

He is the author of the Demon Cycle, whose first volume was published in the UK by HarperCollins's Voyager imprint in 2008 as The Painted Man and in the US by Del Rey Books as The Warded Man. Contents. One is Arlen Bales, formerly of a small hamlet who, after many hard lessons, has become the Warded Man (so called because he has covered himself in demon-warding runes)

Table of Contents One of the larger demons caught movement in the brush and reached out with.

For long moments, the two newcomers stared at each other, foreheads throbbing, as a vibration passed in the air between them. One of the larger demons caught movement in the brush and reached out with frightening quickness to snatch a rat from its cover. The coreling brought the rodent up close, studying it curiously. As it did, the demon’s snout became ratlike, nose and whiskers twitching as it grew a pair of long incisors. The coreling’s tongue slithered out to test their sharpness. One of the slender demons turned to regard it, forehead pulsing.

 The sun is setting on humanity. The night now belongs to voracious demons that arise as the sun sets, preying upon a dwindling population forced to cower behind ancient and half-forgotten symbols of power. These wards alone can keep the demons at bay, but legends tell of a Deliverer: a general—some would say prophet—who once bound all mankind into a single force that defeated the demons. Those times, if they ever existed, are long past. The demons are back, and the return of the Deliverer is just another myth . . . or is it?Out of the desert rides Ahmann Jardir, who has forged the warlike desert tribes of Krasia into a demon-killing army. He has proclaimed himself Shar’Dama Ka, the Deliverer, and he carries ancient weapons—a spear and a crown—that give credence to his claim. Sworn to follow the path of the first Deliverer, he has come north to bring the scattered city-states of the green lands together in a war against demonkind—whether they like it or not.    But the northerners claim their own Deliverer. His name was Arlen, but all know him now as the Warded Man: a dark, forbidding figure whose skin is tattooed with wards so powerful they make him a match for any demon. The Warded Man denies that he is the Deliverer, but his actions speak louder than words, for he teaches men and women to face their fears and stand fast against the creatures that have tormented them for centuries. Once the Shar’Dama Ka and the Warded Man were friends, brothers in arms. Now they are fierce adversaries. Caught between them are Renna, a young woman pushed to the edge of human endurance; Leesha, a proud and beautiful healer whose skill in warding surpasses that of the Warded Man himself; and Rojer, a traveling fiddler whose uncanny music can soothe the demons—or stir them into such frenzy that they attack one another.      Yet as old allegiances are tested and fresh alliances forged, all are blissfully unaware of the appearance of a new breed of demon, more intelligent—and deadly—than any that have come before.

Comments: (7)

Der Bat
After reading the first book, "The Warded Man", I was really excited to start the next book in the series. Instead of moving on with the story we get a back story of Jadir and Abban and how their relationship developed. I understand that this helps us understand why Jadir has a kind of soft spot for the man...but I don't think it was worth dedicating most of the book to it.
Then we finally get to the Warded Man and how things are developing...or aren't developing...there. There were a few side stories that were pretty neat but all in all I was a little disappointed with how much of the book was actually dedicated to moving the story along rather than more in-depth glimpses into another character's history.
The ending was supposed to be some sort of *gasp* twist but I was more confused than ever. Without giving the ending away it left me rather concerned for the welfare of other characters involved and wondered how the author could pull the ending out of thin air. It simply didn't make sense.
By all means, read the book, but don't believe for a moment that this "Daylight War" will have taken any steps further than when you first start off. After reading the review for the next book, it seems like the third book is just a repeat of this one. Another dip into the past of character and then a snails pace move forward at the end of the book. Will I still read it? Sure...after I read a different book. Maybe some time away will bring back the feelings I once had for the characters in the first book.
Cktiell
The Warded Man, the first in this series, is quite a good book.

This one is not. 2 stars is a bit generous.

The first part of the book is a flashback of a "bad guy" from the first: Jardir, how he developed. He grew up in a pseudo-Arab world, where there is no imagination or grace, only a competitive, unfriendly, warrior-ethos (though warriors so rough on each other could hardly be a military team!) Neil Gaiman writes somewhere that fantasy books let down their readers by not providing what "fantasy" should -- and this book is a perfect example of that short-coming. You want Arabian fantasy? Try the Arabian Nights. You want military scifi? There's lots of good stuff out there. But this... amazingly dull world-building.

Yes, what other reviewers have complained about -- the reliance of rape to forward character development, the insertion of bizarre country accents, the newly toothless demons, and the characterization of the women (Leesha especially) etc -- is all so true and so annoying. Character development is a mess, too. But I have some fondness for the (spoiler alert!) rescue of Renna, as inevitable as it was (and as cheap a plot device as it was.) It flowed well, and I did root for her.

But enough. I won't read any more in the series.
Alsath
[Note: no spoilers for book 2 in this review / but assumes you've read book 1]

In this book, Brett takes a departure to focus primarily on the character of Ahmann Jardir (the guy who stole the spear from the warded man in book 1). This focus lasts for the first third (approx.) of the book before returning to the three main protagonists from book 1 with an occasional revisit to see what Jardir and his entourage are up to.

I really enjoy Brett's writing. His plot and character interactions are clearly well-planned and engaging and the writing is generally pretty fast-paced with a heavy dose of action. My biggest issue with the series so far is the fact that one story (the warded man) is so much more engaging than the others which begin to feel like so much padding. The second book continues this trend with a focus on a character backstory that, while engaging in its own right, doesn't seem to add much to the arc of the overall story.

I've become most interested in learning about the demon world, how to fight them, what types of demons have yet to be added to the menagerie, how humans defeated them before and how we'll triumph again. Unfortunately, this element of the story doesn't advance much - and from what I've read in reviews of future books in the series, it sounds as if this trend continues. With that in mind, I probably won't continue on in the series (until, of course, someone combines only these elements of the story together into a single incredibly interesting book that I'll probably breeze through in a sitting :)
The Desert Spear: Book Two of The Demon Cycle download epub
Action & Adventure
Author: Peter V. Brett
ISBN: 0345503813
Category: Literature & Fiction
Subcategory: Action & Adventure
Language: English
Publisher: Del Rey; 1st Edition edition (April 13, 2010)
Pages: 608 pages