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The Little Hotel: A Novel download epub

by Christina Stead


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The Little Hotel book.

The Little Hotel book.

The little hotel : a novel. The little hotel : a novel. by. Stead, Christina, 1902-. New York : H. Holt and Co. Collection. inlibrary; printdisabled; ; china.

Christina Stead was a committed Marxist, although she was never a member of the Communist Party. She spent much of her life outside Australia, although she returned before her death.

Christina Stead was an Australian writer regarded as one of the twentieth . Christina Stead’s unforgettable final novel-a profound examination of love and radicalism during the McCarthy era.

Christina Stead was an Australian writer regarded as one of the twentieth century’s master novelists. Based on Stead’s experiences living in European hotels, The Little Hotel is a captivating portrait of what happens when strangers-and their desires, lies, and fears-live in close quarters. Christina Stead.

For Gunnvor and Oliver Stallybrass. The little girl had eaten cooked roots and gone without milk during the German occupation and was on her way to Villars, a health resort not far from us which is chiefly for the tubercular, though we do not use that word

For Gunnvor and Oliver Stallybrass. The little girl had eaten cooked roots and gone without milk during the German occupation and was on her way to Villars, a health resort not far from us which is chiefly for the tubercular, though we do not use that word. The Mayor of B. was very pleasant, but said he would not risk the germ contact with Germans; and he was ever after served in his room.

Based on Stead’s experiences living in European hotels, The Little Hotel is a captivating portrait of what happens . Christina Stead (1902–1983) was an Australian writer regarded as one of the twentieth century’s master novelists.

Based on Stead’s experiences living in European hotels, The Little Hotel is a captivating portrait of what happens when strangers-and their desires, lies, and fears-live in close quarters. Stead spent most of her writing life in Europe and the United States, and her varied residences acted as the settings for a number of her novels. She is best known for The Man Who Loved Children (1940), which was praised by author Jonathan Franzen as a crazy, gorgeous family novel and one of the great literary achievements of the twentieth century.

Not a day passes but something happens. Yesterday afternoon a woman rang me up from Geneva and told me her daughter-in-law died. The woman stayed here twice. We became very friendly, though I always. felt there was something she was keeping to herself. I never knew whether she was divorced, widowed or separated. The first time, she talked about her son Gerard. Later, Gerard married. There was something; for she used to telephone from Geneva, crying and saying she had to talk to a friend. I was looking for a friend too.

A Little Tea, a Little Chat. Christina Stead's unforgettable final novel-a profound examination of love and radicalism during the McCarthy era. In the wake of the Great Depression, Emily Wilkes, a young American journalist, travels to a Europe still scarred by World War I. During her crossing, she meets Stephen Howard, a charismatic and wealthy Communist who quickly converts Emily to his ideals when the two become lovers. Fiction Psychological. One fee. Stacks of books.

In a small European hotel in the late 1940s a bizarre group of characters, who all seem to be on the run from some past financial, personal or political horror, come together.

Comments: (7)

Lemana
The book starts off a bit slow but the last half is wickedly funny. Always perceptive, Christina Stead brings the bizarre life of a little hotel to the reader in a way that is impossible not to recognize if you have ever been there. The restaurant scene in Chapter 5 is a tour de force only matched by the incredible chapter in The House of All Nations where the two couples have dinner. I am going to read every one of her books.
Jia
I expected more. I know, I'm a Hun. But throughout my reading of the book, I had the impression it was a poor translation from German into English. Excellent premise, a small hotel, post war Europe, refugees, but for me, there are better portrayals out there.
Bliss
A strange one. Set in lausanne in a small pension style hotel, with an eclectic assortment of permanent or coming-going-coming residents from a variety of European backgrounds.

Nothing really happens. They whinge about each other, reveal themselves, their prejudices, racisms, absurdities as they eat the horrible meals, interact with the hotel staff, or stroll around the lake.

I read one academic feminist analysis which sees Stead as having created synedoches, wherin each character represents a social, economic, financial, political position of post-WW2 Europe, and noone was very nice. There was no Eleanor Roosevelt trying to intelligently steer a United Nations through! I don't know about all this. I don't think I have the patience to unravel its greater meanings, if there are any. Maybe it was a product of its times in that sense.

Stead was a Marxist and she had also lived in Europe and elsewhere following men who didn't really appreciate her and took her for granted, like the only really sympathetic character, Mrs Trollope.

I did really enjoy the wry and ironic tone, which reminded me in places of Trollope's masterpiece - the Barchester Chronicles - though no-one approached the odiousness of Obadiah Slope! Is that why Mrs Trollope was named thus? There were flashes of Jane Austenesque social satire as well. There is a series of grotesques who are very funny. So, synedoches aside, I enjoyed it.
Marelyne
Though London’s Times Literary Supplement has placed Christina Stead in the company of Tolstoy, Dostoevsky, Ibsen, and Joyce, she still remains unknown to most readers in the United States, despite her deliciously twisted sense of humor, her pointed social satire, and her vividly depicted characters. In this novel, set in a small hotel on Lake Geneva in the immediate aftermath of World War II, Stead introduces an assortment of bizarre guests currently living at the small Hotel Swiss-Touring. Though most of them are accustomed to more elegant accommodations, the twenty-six-year-old hotelkeeper, Selda Bonnard, and her slightly older husband Roger do their best to meet their guests’ needs.

In this first person narrative, told by Selda Bonnard, the various guests at the hotel come alive for the reader. One, who claims to be the Mayor of B in Belgium, appears to be certifiable, creating numbered documents about his stay in the hotel and traveling to “the clinic” daily for “injections” and shock treatments. Mrs. Blaise, whose husband comes to visit every other weekend from Basel, claims to have millions of dollars and packets of jewels safely stowed in New York banks. Mrs. Trollope, a dark woman from “the East,” lives with her “cousin,” Robert Wilkins, who is constantly following the exchange rates and suggesting that his “cousin” move her accounts out of England closer to him. A strange English woman named Miss Abbey-Chillard, who appears to have almost no money, also appears to have serious health issues and demands special foods.

These five permanent guests form the core of the novel, and as they reveal themselves through their conversations and interactions, they begin to resemble characters in a dramatic comedy of manners. The hotel employees resent them and their frequently high-handed demands, and an undercurrent of cruelty by the employees toward the guests emerges. The Mayor of B provides unintentional comic relief throughout, and when he begins to imitate the strip tease dancer who lives upstairs, his deep-seated problems become public. Gradually, through the characters’ conversations, the reader learns the nature of the relationships among all the other characters, with most of the action eventually focused on the relationship of Mrs. Trollope and her “cousin,” Robert Wilkins.

All of Stead’s characters are flawed, and since all are shown in intimate scenes in which they reveal themselves, at least to the reader, they inspire a kind of empathy – and even a pervading sadness – which does not often happen within social satire, which is usually characterized by sterotypes. Even Mme. Bonnard, the hotel keeper, has her problems, and though she is the main unifying character, her inflexibility regarding aspects of the hotel management make her less than sympathetic, at some points. The novel as a whole is elegant and consummately literary, building an intense, darkly humorous, and sometimes claustrophobic atmosphere as the characters try to live their straitened lives and survive to live another day in a changed world. Christina Stead, a superb novelist who can easily hold her own with contemporaries Beryl Bainbridge, Fay Weldon, Penelope Lively, and Muriel Spark in England, and Thea Astley and Elizabeth Jolley in Australia, deserves much more recognition in the US.
The Little Hotel: A Novel download epub
British & Irish
Author: Christina Stead
ISBN: 0030132266
Category: Literature & Fiction
Subcategory: British & Irish
Language: English
Publisher: Henry Holt & Co; First Edition edition (April 1, 1975)
Pages: 191 pages