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Too Soon to Panic download epub

by Gordon Forbes


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In Too Soon to Panic, South African tennis player Gordon Forbes interweaves tales of his life on the tennis circuit during the 1950s and 1960s with visits to the professional tennis tour of the 1990s.

In Too Soon to Panic, South African tennis player Gordon Forbes interweaves tales of his life on the tennis circuit during the 1950s and 1960s with visits to the professional tennis tour of the 1990s. The book is a delightful reflection on his travels to the sport's greatest hangouts- Roland Garros, Wimbledon & Queen's Club, Manhattan, the Foro Italico.

Too Soon to Panic book.

Moreover, Forbes's lovely but static prose is tainted somewhat by the specter of his nation's past

Moreover, Forbes's lovely but static prose is tainted somewhat by the specter of his nation's past. While Forbes never addresses directly the subject of South Africa's history of minority rule, his unqualified admiration for Sun City (the once-whites-only South African resort that served as a lightning rod for international censure), his frequent use of pidgin English dialogue, and his inclusion of a passage that seems to lament the passing of an Anglo-Saxon London, makes this book a disquieting read

Gordon Forbes played for the South African Davis Cup team in the 50s and early 60s and returned to the circuit as a writer and observer.

Gordon Forbes played for the South African Davis Cup team in the 50s and early 60s and returned to the circuit as a writer and observer. In 'Too Soon to Panic' he takes the readers behind the scenes at the big tournaments - Wimbledon, Roland Garros and Flushing Meadows; Germany, Spain and Italy - and introduces them to many of tennis's most extraordinary and dynamic characters, including Mark McCormack, Rod Laver, Jim Courier and Andre Agassi.

Gordon Forbes played for the South African Davis Cup team from 1955 to 1963 and reached the Men's Doubles semi-finals at Wimbledon

Gordon Forbes played for the South African Davis Cup team from 1955 to 1963 and reached the Men's Doubles semi-finals at Wimbledon. This work describes life on the tennis circuit from the 50s to the present day and the many characters Forbes has encountered - players, coaches, organizers and fans. Gordon Forbes played tennis for the South African Davis Cup team in the 50s and early 60s and returned to the circuit as a writer and observer. Country of Publication.

Gordon Forbes (born 21 February 1934 Cape Town, South Africa) is a former South African professional tennis . ISBN 978-0-670-86329-7. I'll Take the Sunny Side: A Memoir.

Gordon Forbes (born 21 February 1934 Cape Town, South Africa) is a former South African professional tennis player and author. During the 1950s and 1960s, he was the doubles partner of countryman Abe Segal Gordon Forbes.

In Too Soon to Panic, he's finally loaded up his second serve Gordon Forbes, professional tennis player in the fifties and sixties, has gained certain immortality in his eloquent.

In Too Soon to Panic, he's finally loaded up his second serve. Forbes has certainly lost none of his good humor in the intervening years, even if the game he writes so knowingly about has. Still, with a raconteur like Forbes lending his wit to the proceedings as he lobs anecdote after anecdote, the net result is another ace. From the Back Cover: Gordon Forbes, professional tennis player in the fifties and sixties, has gained certain immortality in his eloquent and hilarious best-selling memoir, A Handful of Summers.

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Comments: (7)

PC-rider
While A Handfull of Summers is the greatest book about tennis ever written, Too Soon To Panic comes in second.. The same flowing prose that Forbes used in his first hit is back and as smooth and poetic as ever. More stories and flashbacks to supplement those in the first book and the perspective of a man who has enjoyed life in and out of tennis to balance it make this sequel ALMOST the equal of its predecessor. For today's serious tennis player and fan it is imperative that he/she explore the world of tennis in its days just before open tennis in 1968 to understand that today's players are clearly missing the boat in their approach to the game that provides them their sustenance. This should be required reading for those joining the ATP Tour.
Jan
This book follows the tennis "career" of Gordon Forbes, but it is more about life than tennis. It follows "A Handful of Summers," by the same author, which is the best book about tennis ever written. These two books and "Late to the Ball" are the Big Three in my opinion.
Otiel
Not quite as good as A Handful of Summers, but still worth the read..Anyone who lived and played tennis in the 50's-60's will appreciate Gordon Forbes....Nice to remember when tennis was a true sport, and not a money machine......
Wrathmaster
Gordon Forbes struck gold in 1978 with the publication of A Handful of Summers, a joyous bacchanalian romp inside the international tennis tour in the 50s and 60s. His new book is more of an afterword to the original. Many of the same characters appear and there is little doubt that Mr. Forbes had a great time during is glory days. While not a disappointment, this novel is not really a novel. It has no plot, it has no rising action, it has no resolution--what it does have is a memory. A memory of times when great tennis players traveled the world for glory, not gobs of cash, and knocked back a few beers at the pub after the daily match was over. An older and wiser Mr. Forbes also pays touching tribute to his sister (wife of tennis starr Cliff Drysdale) who recently passed away. Although unspoken, the reader is compelled to understand that tennis is a vehicle whereby people can socialize together and form the bonds that are both personally important and enjoyable. No doubt, there are many funny anecdotes here (most involving his doubles partner known as Big Abie). However, Mr. Forbes does not seem to have his heart in the telling of them. Rather, he seems to be taking stock of his life and the things that matter to him. Still, it is well written and engaging. This will not disappoint anyone who plays tennis and loves the history of the game.
Bladebringer
In Too Soon to Panic, South African tennis player Gordon Forbes interweaves tales of his life on the tennis circuit during the 1950s and 1960s with visits to the professional tennis tour of the 1990s. The book is a delightful reflection on his travels to the sport's greatest hangouts- Roland Garros, Wimbledon & Queen's Club, Manhattan, the Foro Italico. As Forbes returns to these venues his senses are stirred and he relates anecdotes, usually accompanied by diary entries or notes he made thirty years earlier. The result is a personal, thoughtful and entertaining read.
You will enjoy this book if you want to read stories about the days of amateur tennis, when the players did not receive prize money. Forbes and his friends are lively characters, none more so than Forbes' doubles sidekick, Abe Segal. His sketches of
Rosewall, Ashe, Torben Ulrich and others are also worth the price of the book. A typical yarn recounts the first ever meeting of the players union, presided over President Newcombe, Secretary Riessen and Treasurer Ashe (who kept the players'
$50 membership dues in his pocket.) My own imagination cannot come up with a scenario in which Sampras, Agassi, Safin, Hewitt meet to discuss anything.
Forbes is equally engaging on the subject of his childhood tennis exploits in South Africa, his sister Jean, and his second (and third) careers as a lighting salesman and tennis court manufacturer. The writing is very nice, and by the end of the book you feel as if you inhabited Forbes' memories for a while.
Too Soon to Panic download epub
Contemporary
Author: Gordon Forbes
ISBN: 0140249338
Category: Literature & Fiction
Subcategory: Contemporary
Language: English
Publisher: Penguin Books Ltd (January 1, 1996)
Pages: 353 pages