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Trespassing download epub

by Uzma Aslam Khan


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To look is an act of choice. Today, up in the tree, a book of fables pressed heavily in her lap. The weight was partly psychological.

To look is an act of choice. She should have been studying. She’d failed an exam and ought to be preparing for. the retake. Instead she flipped through the book’s pages, where lay miscellaneous clippings about history and bugs. She found a page ripped from a Gymkhana library book and read it aloud: ‘Silk was discovered in China more than four thousand years ago, purely by accident. For many months Emperor Huang-ti had noticed the mulberry bushes in his luscious garden steadily losing their leaves.

Uzma Aslam Khan in her first novel gives us an interesting and useful view of contemporary Pakistani life, but this book has its flaws. She uses the literary technique of bouncing forward and backward in time far too much, so that assembling the chronology in your mind can be difficult. The characters are presented often in the third person in such a way that they remain distant and, for me, not fully developed.

Uzma Aslam Khan gives us an impression of life in Pakistan today, with all the social, political and economical .

Uzma Aslam Khan gives us an impression of life in Pakistan today, with all the social, political and economical problems that come with it. And she is quite good at doing that. Structurally, Khan’s book Uzma Aslam Khan’s character driven tale of two young Pakistanis, Trespassing, lays out in sweaty detail the tension between the old adage you can’t go home again and the one that says you can take the Pakistani out of Pakistan, but you can’t take the Pakistan out of the Pakistani. Through Daanish, a Pakistani studying in American, and Dia, the precocious daughter of a silk merchant, Khan explores the interplay between tradition and modernization, culture and prejudice.

A world-class tale of love and deceit, rivalry and destiny from the Lahore-based writer Uzma Aslam Khan. Standing in a room with eight thousand tiny creatures, witnessing them perform a dance that few humans even knew occurred; this was life. Everywhere she looked, each caterpillar nosed the air like a wand and out passed silk.

Uzma Aslam Khan is the author of Trespassing and The Geometry of God, both highly acclaimed novels, published around the world. She is the winner of the Bronze Award in the Independent Publishers Book Award, and her previous novel was a Kirkus Best Book of 2009 and a finalist for Foreword Magazine's Best Books of 2009.

Uzma Aslam Khan is a Pakistani writer. Her five novels include Trespassing (2003), The Geometry of God (2008), Thinner Than Skin (2012) and The Miraculous True History of Nomi Ali (2019). Khan was born in Lahore and raised largely in Karachi, though. Khan was born in Lahore and raised largely in Karachi, though her earliest years were nomadic and spent in Manila, Tokyo, and London

Daanish's sojourn in the US during the Gulf War seems included as a device to discuss and denounce American hegemony, but the device works. The contrasts between the developed and developing worlds are enacted in his head.

His head was leaden with yet another night of intermittent sleep. Every morning since his return to Karachi, he’d given up the fight for rest soon after dawn, when the builders arrived next door watched now as a bare-footed,. Every morning since his return to Karachi, he’d given up the fight for rest soon after dawn, when the builders arrived next door watched now as a bare-footed, bare-chested old man climbed a bamboo ladder, balancing a cement bucket on his feeble head. His hair was dry and bleached, like sugar-cane husk. Between the first two toes of his right foot he carried a trowel. The bucket on his head, and two more in his hands, wavered

Trespassing : a novel. by. Khan, Uzma Aslam. Books for People with Print Disabilities.

Trespassing : a novel. Internet Archive Books.

A world-class tale of love and deceit, rivalry and destiny in a truly masterful and thoroughly involving novel from the Lahore-based writer Uzma Aslam Khan. 'Standing in a room with eight thousand tiny creatures, witnessing them perform a dance that few humans even knew occurred; this was life. Everywhere she looked, each caterpillar nosed the air like a wand and out passed silk!When Dia watched one spin, she came closer to understanding the will of God than at any other time.' Dia is the daughter of a silk farmer, Riffat -- an innovative, decisive businesswoman. Like her mother, Dia seems at first sight unrestricted, spirited and resourceful. She seems free. But freedom has its own borders, patrolled by the covetous and the zealous, and there are those who yearn to jump the fence. Daanish has come back to Karachi for his father's funeral, all the way from America, a land where there are plenty of rules but few restrictions. When Dia and Daanish meet, they chafe against all the formalities. It is left to a handful of silkworms, slipped inside a friend's dupatta, tickling skin, to rupture the fragile peace of both their houses -- to make the space in which Dia and Daanish can create something together!

Comments: (7)

Gabar
This complicated novel, set primarily during the period of the Gulf War, is of interest for its perspective on the relationship between America and Pakistan and for its depiction of everyday life in Karachi and in rural Pakistan.

There are many stories here, told through different narrators and through shifts back and forth in time. There is the story of an unhappy young Pakistani man attending an American college that seems to be a cross between Amherst and UMass. There is another plot line that follows the lives of several different women, from different generations, as they push up against religious and cultural barriers. At times the novel offers a lyrical rendering of Pakistani scenes like a seaside cove and a silkworm factory, while at other times it strives to depict the difficulties of life in a sprawling city where the water and electricity are never reliable. Yet another story follows a village man who comes to the city and, for a time, casts his lot with dispossessed men empowered by a flood of cheap American arms. All of this is wound around a love story that seems designed to appeal to---it's hard to say to whom, exactly. The illicit embraces of the lovers, Dia and Daanish, ultimately prove wearying to read about, and thus the final revelation of the fate of their love is only a fizzle.

This might have been a better novel had it not tried to do so many things, in so many different voices. The dialogue is often flat and predictable, and the author's use of metaphor is sometimes cringe-inducing.

For its depiction of life in Pakistan, I much prefer Daniyal Mueenuddin's In Other Rooms, Other Wonders.

M. Feldman
Uafrmaine
There was a lot of jumping around from one country and time period and character to the next, which created confusion and I don't think helped to advance the plot. The author tried to address a number of issues without resolving any of them, in my opinion. I was disappointed.
Rich Vulture
Uzma Aslam Khan in her first novel gives us an interesting and useful view of contemporary Pakistani life, but this book has its flaws. She uses the literary technique of bouncing forward and backward in time far too much, so that assembling the chronology in your mind can be difficult. The characters are presented often in the third person in such a way that they remain distant and, for me, not fully developed. Many women characters come across like romance novel stereotypes with a South Asian twist. Take note that the narrative includes a strong political polemic about United States foreign policy in Iraq and the Middle East which is one-sided and overblown, and yet still a good description of the way many -- indeed, most -- Pakistanis view the the course of U.S. activity and influence in the region. Several reviewers here have said they could not put this book down, but I was glad to be finished with it to get on to better writings. For a much better written and more enjoyable account of modern Pakistani lives and attitudes I would recommend Daniyal Mueenuddin's "In Other Rooms, Other Wonders," a National Book Award finalist.
IWAS
The side story in this book is the ethnic conflict in Karachi and Sindh. The main characters in the novel are affected by this conflict and through them we learn about this still on going violence.
Opithris
I will grant you that the writing is good....therefore 2 stars. The story itself is a rambling mess. The ending is just pathetic.
Incest???? Give me a break. I really took offense at the authors attempt to sneak her anti war and anti American rhetoric into the story line.
She did not have any facts to back up her case and left just enough information to leave an impression. The story never
came together except the ridulous ending of the siblings. I was really disappointed.
Rude
Through three main protagonists, Dia, Daanish and Salaamat, events spool out in America and Pakistan in the mid-eighties to early nineties, through the Gulf War and civil unrest in Pakistan, dissatisfaction breaking out across the country in waves of violence, a bloody past still plaguing the citizens. Through this turmoil, a forbidden love unfolds. Dia, heiress to a silk factory whose father was gruesomely murdered, succumbs to the charms of Daanish, a young man recently returned from America to attend his father's funereal rituals. The two meet innocently enough, Dia accompanying her friend, Nini, whose mother has begun marriage arrangements with Daanish's mother. Contrary to expectations and tradition, Dannish is drawn to Dia, although a natural enmity exists between the two families that neither is aware of. Oblivious, the young lovers meet secretly, often driven and closely observed by Salaamat, a young man who has wandered from place to place, from one occupation to another. Salaamat represents the dispossessed, the invisible citizen of Pakistan, easy prey for opportunists.

Moving backwards through time, the author links her characters through a shared history that builds boundaries where none should exist. Whether through civil unrest and changing political parties or the impact of the Gulf War, these protagonists are controlled by events and social constructs, their brief hours of rule-breaking shattered by reality and the difficult choices of a land in flux. As the landscape moves between 1984 and 1992, events are revealed in reverse, the characters' actions clarified, especially Salaamat, the throwaway who nurtures his own dreams, propelled by events beyond his control, symbolic of the strife that has invaded his country. Contrasting lifestyles and class differences, Khan's Pakistan clings to tradition, yet is riddled by political upheaval, citizens carving out ordinary lives in extraordinary times.

The author clarifies the reaction of such countries to American foreign policy, the constantly changing political climate in Pakistan reflecting its internal problems, but also the reaction of citizens to world events. Given Pakistan's particular vulnerabilities, real politics play out in the daily lives of those affected and these characters, while dealing with personal issues, are greatly influenced by their political environment, their attitudes shaped by a perception of helplessness to control events, embittered by a lack of stability and economic resources. Clinging to tradition for a semblance of normalcy, the characters are defined by their inability to adapt and a confusion bred of exposure to such a vastly different culture, America imbued with mythical proportions, stripped of the very individuality that so humanizes the characters in the novel. Luan Gaines/ 2005.
Trespassing download epub
Contemporary
Author: Uzma Aslam Khan
ISBN: 0143029851
Category: Literature & Fiction
Subcategory: Contemporary
Language: English
Publisher: Penguin Books India Pvt Ltd (May 19, 2003)
Pages: 448 pages