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Headlong download epub

by Michael Frayn


Epub Book: 1566 kb. | Fb2 Book: 1675 kb.

He’s taken on a little reality for me – he’s shed a little of his stark non-existence.

Headlong (. ISBN 0-8050-6285-8) is a novel by Michael Frayn, published in 1999. The plot centres on the discovery of a long-lost painting from Pieter Bruegel's series The Months. The story is essentially a farce, but contains a large amount of scholarship about the painter.

Michael Frayn's Headlong falls short in two ways: The book's comedy isn't quite uproarious enough, even in its moments of intended farce, and throughout the narrative the reader feels slightly disoriented, uncertain about the novel's tone ) There's certainly no want of artistry i. .

Michael Frayn's Headlong falls short in two ways: The book's comedy isn't quite uproarious enough, even in its moments of intended farce, and throughout the narrative the reader feels slightly disoriented, uncertain about the novel's tone ) There's certainly no want of artistry in these pages, but none of the effects seem quite right.

Huge entertaining and informative, Michael Frayn's book about an art historian turned frantic detective is a delight from start to finish.

In Headlong, Michael Frayn, "the master of what is seriously funny" (Anthony Burgess), offers a procession of superbly . Supremely wise and wickedly funny, Headlong elevates Frayn into the front rank of contemporary novelists.

In Headlong, Michael Frayn, "the master of what is seriously funny" (Anthony Burgess), offers a procession of superbly realized characters, from the country squire gone to seed to his giddy, oversexed young wife. And at the heart of the clamor is Breugel's vision, its dark tones warning of the real risks of temptation and obsession. Supremely wise and wickedly.

Toby Jones, Gina McKee, Tim McInnerny and Denise Gough in Robin Brooks' adaptation of Michael Frayn's novel. Martin is asked to value some paintings and, though he's no expert, he is immediately sure one of them is a priceless missing masterpiece. When a local down-on-his-luck landowner asks Martin Clay, a young would-be art historian, to value some paintings, Clay.

Michael Frayn's "Headlong" (1999) turns alternately from comic novel to lively art history and back again. However, I'm sorry to say this book is on the whole a significant error of judgement in a wide variety.

Michael Frayn's "Headlong" (1999) turns alternately from comic novel to lively art history and back again Читать весь отзыв. Пользовательский отзыв - AnneBrooke - LibraryThing. I'm normally a fan of all Frayn's work and count him as one of the best living writers we have.

Headlong by Michael Frayn (1999) Picador (2000) 352 pp. Just a few days after seeing his play Democracy, I was wandering around London’s National Gallery bookshop when I first saw Michael Frayn’s novel Headlong

Headlong by Michael Frayn (1999) Picador (2000) 352 pp. Just a few days after seeing his play Democracy, I was wandering around London’s National Gallery bookshop when I first saw Michael Frayn’s novel Headlong. I didn’t know he wrote novels because I knew Frayn only for Copenhagen, Noises Off, and now Democracy, all great plays. I was even more surprised when I saw that Headlong was a Booker finalist, losing out that year to Coetzee’s Disgrace.

But Michael Frayn's Headlong falls short in two ways: The book's comedy isn't quite uproarious enough, even in its .

But Michael Frayn's Headlong falls short in two ways: The book's comedy isn't quite uproarious enough, even in its moments of intended farce, and throughout the narrative the reader feels slightly disoriented, uncertain about the novel's tone. In England Frayn is a fairly well-known literary figure, a former newspaper columnist, comic novelist (The Tin Men and Sweet Dreams should rank high in any pantheon of modern humorous fiction), successful playwright (the ingenious "Noises Off" - about a provincial theater group's backstage goings-on - was even made into a film), and translator.

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Comments: (7)

Linn
After first reading the author's "Skios," which I found laugh-out-loud hilarious, I was eager to read another of his books. This one was very interesting, but humorous in a much quieter, ironic style. I do like reading books about academic/professor types and I enjoyed the tangled web of deception that the main character must weave as he tries to make a fortune from a lost painting "discovered" in a neighbor's house. However, some darker themes of his neglect of his wife and his desire to fool those who trust him make him less than admirable in the end. An unexpected bonus of this book is getting a bit of education in the Dutch painters and political events in the Netherlands of the 1500's.
Kajishakar
It's a fairly funny novel with a rather flimsy plot but it does offer the benefit of interesting lessons in European and Art history, at least for anyone with latent interests in such subjects. The author's skills as a playright shine through and at times it's hard to not see the book as a script for a play or movie. Order the digital version for easy dictionary consultations, lest you like thumbing through Webster's pages. The author likes using words rarely encountered even in intelligent conversation, to purposeful effect. All in all a good bedtime read.
godlike
This is not a bad book, exactly. It's just that Frayn dives headlong into so many things at once herein that it all ends up being terribly confusing and emotionally deflating in the end, which may be the point, about where obsessions lead one, or it may not. Who knows? By the end, one simply feels too twirled about to care a damn.

If you love the paintings of Pieter Brueg(h)el the Elder - one of the things you'll learn is that he altered the orthography of his surname twice, removing and then reinstating the "h" - though nobody quite knows why, then you will love the in depth iconological as well as iconographical (q.v. the book) descriptions of the import of his paintings. I know I did.

If you're interested in the history of the Netherlands - There were 17 of them, by the way, nether or low lands, that is, or so you shall learn - then the book will also fascinate you. This part was engrossing to me as well.

It's the modern setting and characters where everything falls short. Only one of the characters is even two dimensional, Martin Clay; the rest, such as his wife Kate, are such one-dimensional stick figures that the reader is hard-pressed to bother or care about them at all.

At one point in the narrative, Martin is comparing himself to Icarus, who, flying too close to the sun, falls headlong into the sea. By the end, he's describing himself as being thrown headlong into a millpond, by a rout of yobbish Lowlanders.

This is certainly how this particular reader felt at the end.
Haralem
I enjoyed 'Spies', this was so different. The searching to discover if the Brueghel painting was actually one involved so much complex history, intertwined with the English countryside cottage with wifey and baby relationship and at times comic contrast with the corrupt owner at the big house and the seductive wife, to the succession of historical dates, politics, etc partly fascinating but got hard to take in. I began to wish it would hurry up!
Spilberg
Michael Frayn drew me into the story but the best part of the book was the background to the painter. It covers a most interesting period in history when the Reformation and the Counter-Reformation was at its peak. The fact that a painter of the skill and authority of Bruegel had to hide the real meaning of his work tells us more about that time than the average history book. The solid detective work that our anti-hero carries out gave me a great insight into the major libraries of London and his chasing of connections and meanings were always helped by the ready availability of reference material. An interesting but hardly a page-turner. i was sometimes inclined to give it up but I wanted to find out how it all ended
Chuynopana
Visited London for the first time this past August and among the highlights of the trip were reading 'Headlong' and seeing Frayn's 'Copenhagen'. Terrific blend of farce, moral ambiguity and scholarship, this is one of the best books I've read all year. Tremendously entertaining, it also includes some of the most lucid art history I've ever read. Frayn makes Bruegel's paintings come alive and his descriptions of Holland under Spanish rule are chilling. Very intelligent. Very funny.
Steelcaster
a Southern mystery set in a small town disrupted by a body= liked the writing with feel of the small town in the midst of a crime- easy pace to solution.
For an author with a makes-you-fall-down-laughing
reputation, this is a remarkably sane story at its heart. It does have the same universal absurdities that can be found in 'The Treasure of Sierra Madre'
or 'She Stoops to Conquer', but at heart this is a deeply intriguing political inquiry into the work of a great artist, and its blend of political, religious, historical, and artistic analysis contains a brilliant series of well-asked questions and decisively imagined
probable answers.

It's a bit like Beef Wellington, with the outer shell plot all enjoyable pastry, and the story-within-a-story all good red meat.

I very much expect the author could never have published his analysis and theory as scholarship -- too much jump-the-potholes speculation -- but, by cleverly wrapping it in a comedic fiction, he can give his best intuitive faculties full play without wasting time peeling Brussels sprouts to go with the meal.

Mitchell
Headlong download epub
Contemporary
Author: Michael Frayn
ISBN: 0571201474
Category: Literature & Fiction
Subcategory: Contemporary
Language: English
Publisher: Faber and Faber; New Edition edition (2000)
Pages: 400 pages