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The Shores of Another Sea (Classics of Modern Science Fiction Volume 3) download epub

by George Zebrowski,Michael Booth,Isaac Asimov,Chad Oliver


Epub Book: 1490 kb. | Fb2 Book: 1618 kb.

Chad Oliver, George Zebrowski (Introduction) .

Chad Oliver, George Zebrowski (Introduction). Isaac Asimov (Foreword). Picked up because I've very much enjoyed other anthropological speculative fiction by Oliver. A first contact story with an anthropological twist, The Shores of Another Sea, first published in 1971, is one of Chad Oliver's best Science Fiction novels. The action takes place in a remote station on the African plains of Kenya. The baboons are acting strange.

Royce Crawford runs a baboonery in Kenya until a mysterious alien presence brings a new look of cold intelligence to the eyes of the baboons that disappeared from their cages. ISBN13:9780517551868. Release Date:July 1984.

The Joy Makers (Classics of modern science fiction The Paradox Men has become a classic in the SF field, for good reason. It was first published as "Flight Into Yesterday", in the May 1949 Startling Stories.

The Joy Makers (Classics of modern science fiction James Gunn. The Paradox Men has become a classic in the SF field, for good reason.

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Home Isaac Asimov Gold: The Final Science Fiction Collection . This thought led to a book that some people consider the first piece of modern science fiction -Frankenstein by Mary Shelley, published in 1818. In this book, Victor Frankenstein, an anatomist, collects fragments of freshly dead bodies and, by the use of new scientific discoveries (not specified in the book), brings the whole to life, creating something that is referred to only as the " Monster" in the book. My robot stories and novels seem to have become classics in their own right and, with the advent of the "Robot City" series of novels, have become the wider literary universe of other writers as well.

The first Golden Age of Science Fiction, often recognized in the United States as the period from 1938 to 1946, was an era during which the science fiction genre gained wide public attention and many classic science fiction stories were published

The first Golden Age of Science Fiction, often recognized in the United States as the period from 1938 to 1946, was an era during which the science fiction genre gained wide public attention and many classic science fiction stories were published. In the history of science fiction, the Golden Age follows the "pulp era" of the 1920s and 1930s, and precedes New Wave science fiction of the 1960s and 1970s

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Find nearly any book by Chad Oliver. A Star Above It and Other Stories (Nesfa's Choice).

Symmes Chadwick Oliver was an American science fiction and Western writer and chairman of the .

Symmes Chadwick Oliver was an American science fiction and Western writer and chairman of the Department of Anthropology of the University of Texas at Austin. On the dusty, remote plains of Kenya, Royce Crawford runs a baboonery.

Isaac Asimov bibliography (chronological).

Acclaimed science fiction author George Zebrowski conducts interviews with four Grand Masters of Science Fiction: Isaac .

Acclaimed science fiction author George Zebrowski conducts interviews with four Grand Masters of Science Fiction: Isaac Asimov, Ray Bradbury, Arthur C. Clarke, and James Gunn. These conversations cover a wide variety of topics, from writing and science fiction to science and the future. One of the not-to-be-missed books for anyone interested in the history of science fiction and the authors who shaped the field. Read on the Scribd mobile app. Download the free Scribd mobile app to read anytime, anywhere.

Royce Crawford runs a baboonery in Kenya until a mysterious alien presence brings a new look of cold intelligence to the eyes of the baboons that disappeared from their cages

Comments: (2)

Nirn
This book would make a great movie. Calling Stephen Soderberg or David Fincher. This tale of how a confident and intelligent scientist studying primates in the savannah of east Africa discovers that instead he has become the subject of an alien mind and possibly a future abductee is chilling . It proceeds step by step via the scientist's perceptions until first the reader and then the protagonist realizes that an elaborate trap has been set for him and is closing in quickly.The book is so quietly written--no Stephen King or Peter Straub theatrics here --that it is doubly frightening. I'm still thinking about this story six months after reading it.
anonymous
Suppose that one day man landed on some distant planet. Why would he have come, what impulse would have driven him across the darkness and the light-years? Could he explain, and would he even try? If he set out to explore that fearful world, if he trapped some specimens, what would he do if he were attacked by monstrous beings he could not understand? (135)

Chad Oliver is a well-known proponent of anthropological science fiction. John Clute (of SF encyclopedia) proclaims him “pioneer in the application of competent anthropological thought to sf themes.” Despite being relatively prolific between the 50s-70s (a handful of short stories appeared in the 80s), The Shores of Another Sea (1971) retains a distinctly 50s tone, style, characterization, and positivist outlook.

This is a first contact story of the classic mold mixed with a few minute, but intriguing, implications of more philosophical undercurrents. Two themes dominate the work: 1) An overwhelming nostalgic longing for a past way of life more similar to our ancestors (the joys of the hunt, closeness to the land, the simple pleasures of life) and 2) The speculation, à la Stanislaw Lem, that first-contact is not as simple as we would like to imagine. The alien life that we might encounter has the distinct possibility of being so different and unrecognizable that we might not even think that it’s sentient.

The impact of the promising and almost allegorical premise–a man and his family out in rural Kenya trapping baboons for medical experimentation who witness aliens who might be conducting similar and equally sinister experiments–is ultimately weakened by Oliver’s overly mundane and descriptive prose. At points the feel of reading a story straight out of Texas Monthly about hunting some form of wildlife becomes overpowering. For context, Chad Oliver taught Anthropology at the University of Texas at Austin and felt deeply about the Texas landscape.

Occasionally the work takes a reactionary stance against contemporary SF, this probably due to Oliver’s frustration with the changes in genre precipitated by the New Wave movement and 60s literature in general. For example, comments such as this one sneak into the narrative, “the writing that was currently much admired seemed to deal exclusively with sex hang-ups and the feeble joys of drug addiction” (58). Of course Oliver’s American hero Royce Crawford, a mouthpiece for the author himself, discovers that there is still a market for “more or less factual stories about hunting and fishing” (58) and it is this “factual” turn that informs the telling of The Shores of Another Sea.

By far the most impressive element of the work was the depiction of the Native Kamba people from Kenya. Oliver is very careful to avoid the majority of the standard clichés: Royce laments “Mutisya, Wathome–they were good men. They had resources that he had not expected. He hated the barriers between them [i.e. they are in his employ]. Their differences were small indeed. Skin color, background, wealth [...] Men were men, that was all” (141).

Vaguely recommended — especially for readers intensely devoted to SF that homages, and oozes, the 1950s. Despite my slight disappointment with The Shores of Another Sea I still want to get my hands on his short story collection Another Kind (1955) and his earlier novel, Unearthly Neighbors (1960).

Brief Plot Summary/Analysis (*some spoilers*)

Royce Crawford, a graduate of the University of Texas at Austin, restless in his office job signs on to something more suitable for his tastes, i.e. trapping baboons in Kenya to be shipped to the US for medical experimentation. Of course, this type of job also allows for extensive hunting on the side of various exotic animals which Royce greatly enjoys. He brings his family along with him, his wife and two children, and comes to deeply respect his employees, men from the local Kamba people.

Soon however, he starts to notice a series of strange events — baboons mysteriously escape from their cages. Eventually a man is found near the baboonery that appears to have been killed by the beasts! Royce soon deduces that there is some force at play—the baboons stop acting like baboons and appear to be controlled. The parallel set-up is Oliver’s aim. Man experiments on the baboons, who, despite their status as primates (and thus genetic similarity to man), are held as little more than brutes. And, these unexplained aliens who seem to be also experimenting, in their own way, on the baboons.

The tension increases and a showdown, the best written portion of the novel, is imminent. Thankfully, Oliver’s vision is more similar to the later movie Close Encounters of the Third Kind (1977) than Alien (1979).
The Shores of Another Sea (Classics of Modern Science Fiction Volume 3) download epub
Contemporary
Author: George Zebrowski,Michael Booth,Isaac Asimov,Chad Oliver
ISBN: 0517551861
Category: Literature & Fiction
Subcategory: Contemporary
Language: English
Publisher: Crown; 1st Crown ed edition (July 25, 1984)
Pages: 214 pages