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The Prince of West End Avenue: A Novel download epub

by Alan Isler


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Comedy and tragedy are combined in The Prince of West End Avenue as Otto Korner, the narrator, directs his quirky.

Comedy and tragedy are combined in The Prince of West End Avenue as Otto Korner, the narrator, directs his quirky. In this novel, the winner of the National Jewish Book Award, author Alan Isler creates a world populated by libidinous senior citizens; however, although humorous, there are moments of profound realization as well. The main character is Otto Korner, a survivor of the Holocaust, who now resides in the Emma Lazarus retirement home in the West End, Manhattan. He is involved in a production of & put on by the home's residents. Part of the plot revolves around the attempt to put on a play where the actors keep dying, end up in hospital, or simply walk away in a huff.

I detected several words which I had never heard before. I read this book because we once lived on West End Avenue (I recognize the building on the cover) and having grown up in Indiana & Ohio, then 13 years in Washington, . with a few visits to Manhattan, the upper West Side with Zabar's & the bagel store right near my subway stop was like a new country and a delightful one.

Shakespeare, William, 1564-1616, Jewish old age homes, Holocaust survivors, Amateur theater, Older men, Theater, Amateur theater, Holocaust survivors, Jewish old age homes, Older men, Theater. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books. t on October 14, 2011. SIMILAR ITEMS (based on metadata).

Alan Isler presents us with a gallery of aging gallants competing for the favours of octogenarian coquettes and the biggest parts in the play. Isler blends his contemporary story with Korner’s reminiscences about his long-ago past, glimpses of a gone-with-the-wind Europe and his pursuit of the elusive Magda. This is written with huge warmth and wit. Isler’s sentences are a joy to read and the writing fairly thrums with cultural erudition. If you enjoy New York Jewish humour and pathos, the answer to the headline question is a resounding yes.

Alan Isler (September 12, 1934 – March 29, 2010) was an American novelist and professor. He left his native England for the United States at age 18, served in the US Army from 1954 to 1956, received a doctorate in English Literature from Columbia University and taught Renaissance Literature at Queens College, City University of New York from 1967 to 1995. In 1994 he won the National Jewish Book Award and the JQ Wingate Prize for his first novel The Prince of West End Avenue, which was also a finalist for the National Book Critics Circle Award.

What you imply about me, I choose to forget," he said. But you have insulted a lady. That I can neither forget nor ignore. cable honor and unassailable virtue. I think you want to apologize. WHAT IS THE MATTER with these old men? I am reminded of Jumbo the Elephant. When he arrived in the England of Queen Victoria (a woman, as we know, of unbounded though scarcely acknowledged sexual energy), he was still quite young, and, vainly longing for.

From the National Jewish Book Award-winning author of The Prince of West End Avenue comes a sparkling new novel that confirms Alan Isler's unique gift for .

From the National Jewish Book Award-winning author of The Prince of West End Avenue comes a sparkling new novel that confirms Alan Isler's unique gift for mingling comedy and tradgedy. Despite a severe lack of piety and the inconvenient fact of his Jewish birth, Edmond Music chose the priesthood as a career. Much to the Vatican's chagrin, he is entrenched at an English estate possessed of a fabulous library. His first novel, The Prince of West End Avenue, won the 1994 National Jewish Book Award and was one of five fiction finalists for the National Book Critics Circle Award. His second novel, Kraven Images, was published in 1996.

Comedy and tragedy are combined in The Prince of West End Avenue as Otto Korner, the narrator, directs his quirky, libidinous fellow residents of a retirement home in a. .

Comedy and tragedy are combined in The Prince of West End Avenue as Otto Korner, the narrator, directs his quirky, libidinous fellow residents of a retirement home in a production of Hamlet, all the while recalling his life's adventures spanning the 20th century in Europe and then America. Korner is a Holocaust survivor, and the arrival of a luscious new employee who bears a shocking resemblance to a woman he had loved in his youth throws him back into the past. Alan Isler lives in New york City and Sag Harbor, NY. He also is the author of Clerical Errors and The Bacon Fancier He formerly was a professor of English at Queens College.

Alan Isler's novel has been compared with the works of Isaac Bashevis Singer and Saul Bellow. His first novel, The Prince of West End Avenue, was acclaimed on both sides of the Atlantic

Alan Isler's novel has been compared with the works of Isaac Bashevis Singer and Saul Bellow. Can it possibly live up to such praise? It can, it does". His first novel, The Prince of West End Avenue, was acclaimed on both sides of the Atlantic. In America it won the National Jewish Book Award and was one of the five fiction nominees for the 1994 National Book Critics Circle Award. In Britain it won the Jewish Quarterly Fiction Award. He is also the author of the novels, Kraven Images and Clerical Errors, and a collection of novellas, The Bacon Fancier. For the latest books, recommendations, offers and more.

This novel was a joy to read.

The author releases another book. This novel was a joy to read. winner of the National Jewish Book Award, the brilliant debut novel of an author Michiko Kakutani of the New York Times has. An Auschwitz survivor living in a retirement home on Manhattan's Upper West Side is haunted by events from the past as he directs his fellow retirees in a stage. com: The Prince of West End Avenue: A Novel (9780140245141.

Comedy and tragedy are combined in The Prince of West End Avenue as Otto Korner, the narrator, directs his quirky, libidinous fellow residents of a retirement home in a production of Hamlet, all the while recalling his life's adventures spanning the 20th century in Europe and then America. Korner is a Holocaust survivor, and the arrival of a luscious new employee who bears a shocking resemblance to a woman he had loved in his youth throws him back into the past. The narrator weaves together past and present, with events cresting at the performance of Hamlet. Though the machinations of the Emma Lazarus retirement home's Dickensian residents are always in the novel's foreground, the character and history of the narrator, Hamlet-like himself, are gradually revealed as the story's integral backdrop. His flashbacks include his precocious beginnings as a would-be poet, his bungled encounters with the incipient Dada movement and with Lenin in World War I Zurich, his first marriage and his life in Weimar Germany during the rise of Hitler, his experience of the Holocaust, and his immigration to the United States and second marriage. Little by little, and with increasing urgency, he is forced to confront truths about himself that he had thought safely buried. These unwelcome memories are interspersed (and overlap) with the current doings at the retirement home, the hilarious rivalries, factions, jockeying for position, and passionate love affairs of the residents. The novel ends on the night of the first public performance of the Emma Lazarus Old Vic's production of Hamlet, shortly after the last of Otto Korner's secrets is wrung from him. His is a story of life's chaos, complexity, richness -and moral dilemmas. It is a story of how our human qualities - pride, envy, timidity - can sometimes lead us to unintentionally hurt or even destroy those we love.

Comments: (7)

Otrytrerl
Why don't I know how it's narrated? Because I read it years ago -- loved the premise and have just received what is now my 2nd copy - (first copy in storage). You don''t have to live in Manhattan to find this story charming, moving, joyous, poignant, West End Avenue has many buildings for communal housing and asssted living. Could it be set anywhere? Judge for yourself if some part of the premise attracts you. I'd like to think anyone who is or knows someone in older age who is yet 'alive to the world', who still reads, or who used to, who loves Shakespeare (yes, Shakespeare), will be uplifted by this book, original in a special way: that is, joy and sorrow commingled. Set in a home for the Jewish aged, the protagonist discovers there are, among the residents, retired theater people. And, yes, he does decide to put on a play. Is this of interesrt so far? If so, do read this somewhat unknown book. If you're grieving for an arts loving loved one, or yourself -- this is ultimately a life-affirming book.
Oreavi
A thoughtful, insightful look back into a Holocaust survivor's life. Bittersweet at times, it never gets maudlin or mired in self-pity. There is humor, parallels with Hamlet, and a humbling attitude as the protagonist mulls over his past. I was drawn into the story, and it resonated with me long after I finished the book. It was excellently written and I would definitely recommend it to my book group.
Ka
Humorous in places, thoughtful in others. Felt like I got to know some of the characters. A good read, especially for us "senior citizens."
Gerceytone
Very witty & emotional writing from Alan Isler about a Jewish retirement home in New York City. I am not a Shakespeare aficionado, so there were portions of the book that weren't clear to me but it didn't take away from the otherwise enjoyable experience.
Awene
Literary excellence -- amusing at times, yet a deeply poignant story. Alan Isler is a writer of great erudition and obviously enormous intelligence.
Gaiauaco
wonderful book - all old Jewish retires would enjoy reading it.
Mazuzahn
The residents of the Emma Lazarus retirement home in uptown Manhattan are putting on Shakespeare’s Hamlet. But when the director drops out (because he’s dropped dead) the production falls into disarray. Otto Korner, our narrator, should be a shoo-in to take over the reins but some of the players have other ideas. Korner’s not unduly fussed; his mind is on other things - identifying the thief of his priceless letter from Rilke, for one thing, and the distracting new physiotherapist for another. (She reminds him of his first love, Magda Damrosch - indeed, she even has the same initials.)

Alan Isler presents us with a gallery of aging gallants competing for the favours of octogenarian coquettes and the biggest parts in the play. Isler blends his contemporary story with Korner’s reminiscences about his long-ago past, glimpses of a gone-with-the-wind Europe and his pursuit of the elusive Magda. This is written with huge warmth and wit. Isler’s sentences are a joy to read and the writing fairly thrums with cultural erudition. If you enjoy New York Jewish humour and pathos, the answer to the headline question is a resounding yes.

Footnote: It is with profound sadness that on re-reading this wonderful book and then googling Alan Isler, I learned that he passed away in 2010. What a loss to literature.
In this novel, the winner of the National Jewish Book Award, author Alan Isler creates a world populated by libidinous senior citizens; however, although humorous, there are moments of profound realization as well. The main character is Otto Korner, a survivor of the Holocaust, who now resides in the Emma Lazarus retirement home in the West End, Manhattan. He is involved in a production of `Hamlet', put on by the home's residents. Part of the plot revolves around the attempt to put on a play where the actors keep dying, end up in hospital, or simply walk away in a huff. At the same time, Korner encounters a new young physical therapist who reminds him of a woman whom he knew in the inter-war years and who most likely died in WWII, and whose death he may have been responsible for. The past and present merge as Otto takes over directing `Hamlet'; the philosophical musings on death and life mirror Otto's reminiscences. We find he attempted to be a part of the avant-garde movement in Europe after WWI, where he encountered Magda Damrosch, a beautiful woman who toyed with Otto's heart. This is one of those novels where not much happens, yet everything happens, and to say more would spoil it. Suffice to say, Isler's characters are brilliant, and the weaving of `Hamlet' with the Holocaust is mesmerizing. There's enough humor to break the sometimes bleak outlook of some of the characters, and the scenes where the play is being rehearsed are priceless.
The Prince of West End Avenue: A Novel download epub
Contemporary
Author: Alan Isler
ISBN: 0140245146
Category: Literature & Fiction
Subcategory: Contemporary
Language: English
Publisher: Penguin Books; First Edition edition (August 1, 1995)
Pages: 256 pages