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The Bacchae: In a New Translation (Plays for Performance) download epub

by Nicholas Rudall


Epub Book: 1245 kb. | Fb2 Book: 1630 kb.

The conventional wisdom about this play-at least since Friedrich Nietzsche-is that here Euripides repented his earlier rationalist debunking of the Olympian pantheon and returned to the simple faith of his ancestors. The Bacchae" resembles nothing so much as a cautionary tale of the 1960s counterculture.

by Nicholas Rudall and Euripides. Plays for Performance Series. EuripidesAI powerful investigation of religious ecstasy and the resistance to it is an argument for moderation, rejecting the lures of pure reason as well as pure sensuality.

They both live in Chicago, Illinois. Series: Plays for Performance Series.

The Bacchae: In a New Translation (Plays for Performance). 1566630681 (ISBN13: 9781566630689). Wouldn't have taken the chance but Bertie Carvel I trust a bit more than I should and am busy following him around blindly and picking up the books he drops.

Mr. Rudall's splendid translation brings a new power and speakability to Sophocles' prose. One of the greatest, most moving of all tragedies, Antigone continues to have meaning for us because of its depiction of the struggle between individual conscience and state policy, and its delicate probing of the nature of human suffering. Mr. Seller Inventory AAV9781566632119.

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Among undergraduates, Rudall is known particularly for his work with prominent Shakespearean David Bevington, with whom he created and co-taught a two-quarter sequence entitled "History and Theory of Drama".

Among undergraduates, Rudall is known particularly for his work with prominent Shakespearean David Bevington, with whom he created and co-taught a two-quarter sequence entitled "History and Theory of Drama". Rudall is also the founding director of the Court Theatre in Chicago and a multiple Jeff-award-winning actor and translator. YouTube Encyclopedic.

Электронная книга "Antigone: In a New Translation by Nicholas Rudall", Sophocles

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Euripides' powerful investigation of religious ecstasy and the resistance to it is an argument for moderation, rejecting the lures of pure reason as well as pure sensuality. Plays for Performance Series.

Comments: (7)

Rainpick
"The Bacchae," along with Sophocles' "Oedipus at Colonus," marks the end of the great age of Greek tragedy. The conventional wisdom about this play--at least since Friedrich Nietzsche--is that here Euripides repented his earlier rationalist debunking of the Olympian pantheon and returned to the simple faith of his ancestors. I have my doubts. "The Bacchae" resembles nothing so much as a cautionary tale of the 1960s counterculture. While Pentheus, with his mental rigidity and fear of change, bears a striking resemblance to the hero of Chinua Achebe's "Things Fall Apart," Dionysus brings to mind such charismatic--and deadly--cult leaders as Charles Manson, David Koresh, and Jim Jones. Interestingly Dionysus' entourage, like the Manson family, is almost exclusively female. The disgusting savagery of Dionysian ritual illustrates the dangers of abandoning reason, logic, and human decency to follow our dark primitive instincts. A modern treatment of the same theme is Thomas Tryon's "Harvest Home." Paul Woodruff provided the highly informative introduction (although I disagree thoroughly with his conclusions) and his translation into vigorous, straightforward contemporary English gives us a glimpse of what a shattering impact "The Bacchae" must have had on its first audience. "The Bacchae" may well be one of the most disturbing creations in the western literary canon.
Hirah
While one oftentimes appreciates the scholar for diligence, just as often the entry of Liddell & Scott provides more than adequate discussion of the vocabulary. E. R. Dodds provides a thorough discussion of the vocabulary and an interesting excursus on Euripides "Bacchae". The benefit of this scholarship is background data re extant manuscript editions to verify he textus receptus. In a few lines, Dodds gives background info on Euripides and the play. The student should always be aware that the scholar could be wrong in his interpretation, however excellent the scholarship. Studying Greek allows the student to read this type of scholarly work and make a meaningful contribution or interpretation of the play.
Wizer
Medea by Euripedes was a play I chose for my 2015 reading challenge. The play, with only 47 pages took about 1/2 hour to read. My first thought was.....doesn't the woman on the cover look like Salma Hayek?

The play centers around Medea, a goddess who falls madly in love, emphasis on MADLY, with Jason. She gives up everything for this man. We're talking killing, stealing, betraying her father and home, the whole kitten caboodle. She has 2 sons by him then one day, bang........homeboy hooks up with this younger chick, leaves Medea and the kids and marries this home-wrecker. Say what???? Say it isn't so........ oh, it's so!

To put icing on the cake, this home-wrecker's daddy (Creon) banishes her from the land. Allowed to stay one more day she plots her revenge and baby she went for it. Unfortunately her revenge is an act that would cost a lifetime of suffering not only her husband but herself as well.

Medea, although a quick read, is very powerful. You will agree with Medea and understand her pain but will hate her for her decisions. Jason is a loser who tries to convince Medea that what he was doing was for a good reason. Let me tell you something, no one (woman) in there right mind would believe it. What's interesting is the mentality of both individuals. Medea was not afraid to show her emotions, whether sadness, fear or anger but Jason remained calmed and had no hatred towards her. She screamed at him, called him names, yet he thought they could still remain friends until the end.

With no idea what this play was about or how it would turn out. I'm glad I chose it.
Washington
Even though the circumstances aren't current - citizens running off to the countryside to worship Bacchae - and the drama is not what moderns expect - most of the action takes place offstage, there is something in this play that is moving and still speaks to the human experience - at least it did to me. Perhaps it's simply that the characters are thoroughly invested in what they believe to be right and true - and they are also deluded - and pay heavily, the heaviest possible price. Impossible not to be moved by that fundamental human experience even if circumstances are completely different now.

I am not competent to judge the translation, other than it was easy to read. The notes were comprehensive, the opening introduction was very helpful.
Meztihn
I read this for the first time years ago. I read it again in preparation for writing the sequel to the Sparrow Princess, which will be told from the main antagonist's viewpoint. To say this is a story about a woman scorned doesn't even come close to describing the intensity of Medea's hate. Although I could clearly see both sides of this conflict, it occurred to me that this tragedy repeats itself over and over again to varying degrees even until today. And like the story illustrates, the children are always the ones who suffer the most.
Mariwyn
I liked the fresh approaches to gender (so appropriate for a play about Dionysus), from having Dionysus played by a woman, the gifted Ellen Lauren in a fresh and unforgettable performance, to the skirted and sport-jacketed Chorus members, alternating as the "lead" voice.

I had read the play in preparation for seeing the production, was bored stiff with it. So imagine what a wake-up call the Getty's production was. Anne Bogart's direction was lively, inventive, utterly wonderful in every way. I've been telling everyone I know to GO!

I wish you'd extend the run so I could find a way to see this wonderful theatre piece again!

Judith Searle
Santa Monica
The Bacchae: In a New Translation (Plays for Performance) download epub
Dramas & Plays
Author: Nicholas Rudall
ISBN: 1566630681
Category: Literature & Fiction
Subcategory: Dramas & Plays
Language: English
Publisher: Ivan R. Dee (April 1, 1996)
Pages: 64 pages