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Montenegro: A Novel download epub

by Starling Lawrence


Epub Book: 1108 kb. | Fb2 Book: 1678 kb.

FREE shipping on qualifying offers. In 1908, with world war a dark prophecy on the horizon, an English traveler, Auberon Harwell, enters a far valley in Montenegro - a spy sent to assess the political situation while posing as a botanist.

FREE shipping on qualifying offers. Drawn into the drama of a young Serb in love with an unattainable woman.

Good historical novel, personally ruined for me by flimsy female characters. Montenegro" - written by Starling Lawrence and published in 1997 by Farrar Straus & Giroux

Good historical novel, personally ruined for me by flimsy female characters. Montenegro" - written by Starling Lawrence and published in 1997 by Farrar Straus & Giroux. An interesting turn of the century visit to Bosnia.

Montenegro is a novel written by Starling Lawrence. The book was first published in 1997 by Farrar Straus Giroux publishers. The novel is set in the mountains of Balkans of Montenegro. This was the author's first novel.

Norton publishing company. Издание: перепечатанное.

In the forbidding beauty of the mountains of Montenegro, with World War I already a dark prophecy on the horizon, an English traveller with a keen interest in the tangled politics of the Balkans happens upon a remote valley. Norton publishing company.

Montenegro : a novel. Montenegro : a novel. by. Lawrence, Starling.

Berkley Books, 1998 Paperback Very Good very light wear

Berkley Books, 1998 Paperback Very Good very light wear. In an age just before World War I, an agent of a powerful Englishman is sent to the Balkans to see if they can take advantage of the decline of the Ottoman Empire, but the agent finds himself falling love with a woman who is married to a powerful Montenegro. ISBN 10: 0425164462, ISBN 13: 9780425164464. We specialize in books about Greece (Ancient, Byzantine and particularly Modern Greece) Cyprus, and relevant peripheral areas (Albania, Armenia, the Balkans and Ottoman Turkey ) All possible topics covered : Archaeology, Biographies, Cookery, Drama, Fiction,History, Novels set in Greece, Poetry, Religion, Travel.

Starling Lawrence admits that writing a novel was an effort to come to terms with the legacy of his great-grandfather .

Starling Lawrence admits that writing a novel was an effort to come to terms with the legacy of his great-grandfather and of General Electric. And some know him as a writer of books of his own. But few know that the tall, patrician Mr. Lawrence is also the great-grandson of Charles A. Coffin, the first president of General Electric, who made that company into a giant of American industry.

by Starling Lawrence. amp; International Retailers. by Starling Lawrence.

The Lightning Keeper: A Novel – Ebook written by Starling Lawrence. Read this book using Google Play Books app on your PC, android, iOS devices

The Lightning Keeper: A Novel – Ebook written by Starling Lawrence. Read this book using Google Play Books app on your PC, android, iOS devices. Download for offline reading, highlight, bookmark or take notes while you read The Lightning Keeper: A Novel. This is the story of an unlikely love at the dawn of the electric age in America. In 1914, Toma Pekocevic is a penniless immigrant in New York recently escaped from the bloody politics of the Balkans that has claimed most of his family. He is also a gifted inventor who designs a revolutionary water turbine while working with Harriet Bigelow, scion of a proud Connecticut iron-making dynasty now fallen on hard times.

In an age just before World War I, an agent of a powerful Englishman is sent to the Balkans to see if they can take advantage of the decline of the Ottoman Empire, but the agent finds himself falling love with a woman who is married to a powerful Montenegrin Serb

Comments: (7)

Fomand
One of the strengths of Starling Lawrence's "Montenegro" is the care with which the author captures the stern, austere, rock-strewn beauty of that small country in the Balkans. Anyone who has driven the road from Kotor to the country's former capital of Cetinje, and has taken a car up Mount Lovcen with its 27 switchbacks. will appreciate the accuracy of Lawrence's descriptions of the Montenegrin landscape. Set in the years before World War I, "Montenegro" mixes foreign intrigue, war, romance, espionage, and all sorts of physical danger and privation. The novel's protagonist, Auberon Harwell, is an Englishman who is officially traveling in the Balkans as a botanist in search of rare specimens; in fact, however, he has been sent into Montenegro as a sort of amateur spy. His employer, a supercilious British lord, hopes to benefit politically from the tension among Serbs, Turks, and Austrians in that hotly contested part of the world. Lawrence captures well the manner in which Balkan life can combine pastoral beauty and hideous violence. He also does well at interweaving two love stories -- one between Harwell and Lydia Wadham, an Englishwoman who teaches in Cetinje; the other between a young Muslim woman named Aliye and a young Serb man named Toma. Toma faces conflicts of his own: his father, Danilo, wants him to look back into the past and continue the 500-year-old fight against all of Great Serbia's enemies, while his mother, Sofia, wants him to look to the future, leave for America, and secure an education. Less deftly handled are a couple of important plot elements. When an important character suffers a wrist injury late in the novel, the incident seems contrived, forced upon the narrative in order to advance plot developments that Lawrence seems anxious to introduce. And a natural cataclysm that occurs at a climactic point of action in the novel has a definite air of deus ex machina about it; it seems to have been imposed upon the novel's plot, rather than to grow logically out of it. But if you're looking for an unashamedly old-fashioned adventure story, "Montenegro" may be to your liking.
Ceck
A good read for those who have traveled to or are about to travel to the country. Slow start, but did not disappoint.
Bragis
Occasionally, when I read a book, the hype is such that I expect more than I get. This book is billed as a literate spy novel about a British adventurer, young and naive, who gets caught up in the intrigues of the Balkan peninsula during the period just prior to WW1. It turns out to be much less than that, and in a way more. The fact that it doesn't live up to its promise was something of a dissappointment to me, and it was only partly offset by what the book was instead.
Auberon Harwell journeys to Montenegro at the behest of the murky Lord Polgrove, to do something intelligence-wise. We're never sure what Harwell is there for, other than his half-make-believe cover story of collecting flowers for his sponsor. He doesn't seem sure what he's doing either, and muddles around aimlessly for half the book before he begins to actually do things that impact the plot in any way. When he finally gets to some action, the author turns what was supposed to be a spy novel into a tragedy involving a mother's love for her son, and the consequences that flow from that. There is finally some adventure towards the end of the book, and the plot does begin to speed up. It was too late for me, however, to enjoy the book. In the last thirty pages, the book takes some strange turns, and frankly it sounded like he got tired of writing.
Some of the prose is quite eloquent. The question is whether eloquent prose in service a plot that's much ado about nothing. I, frankly, think that the story's the important thing, unless the prose is truly memorable. For me, the book didn't measure up that way.
invincible
Lawrence has done his homework. The scene is 1908, just before three successive wars sweep through the Balkans. It is a time of palpable tension between the Habsburg and Ottoman empires, between Serb and Muslim families on the ground. It is a time of great change in Montenegro. Auberon Harwell, a young British botanist stumbles into the mountains and becomes a catalyst for events great and small. He witnesses both the unstable dance of dying empires and the clash of generations as Toma, the Serb boy, is caught between his nationalist father and his mother who will sacrifice anything to spirit her son away from an early Balkan death. The book's greatest achievement is its detailed eye for the terrain, the people, and the atmosphere of Montenegro. It is a wonderfully evocative diary, a slice of Balkan life that rings true.
mIni-Like
What Auberon Harwell's Montenegrin odyssey does best of all is introduce the fortunate reader to the convolutions of Balkan politics, circa 1908 (or 1992 or 1998). History resonates deeply thoughout Harwell's encounters with the variety of Balkan types. After a few pithy exchanges like, "Where is Serbia?" "Whereever Serbians live," contemporary events begin to drop clearly into place. Rich characterizations, authentic locales and landscapes, dense, almost anthropological observations, and the most chaste of romantic entanglements make this a rewarding, agreeably languorous, novel.
Уou ll never walk alone
The story of Auberon Harwell's gradual involvement with a country to which he is a stanger proves that fiction can be and, in this case, is, a metaphor for history. It is also a very timely novel, for the pre World War I Austria which he describes can be seen as an echo of the current Western debate surrounding the former Yugoslavia. Also, Lawrence gives a balanced historical context for understanding the soul, character and motivation of the Serbs. His lyrical prose captures the essence of the land and the ties of the people to that land in such a way that we can begin to understand the deep nature of the complexities of geopolitical motivations. Also, as the daughter of a Montenegrin exile, this book brought me closer to my own father's story and my own history. Who should we send to mediate the "Balkan problem"? Starling Lawrence!
Montenegro: A Novel download epub
Genre Fiction
Author: Starling Lawrence
ISBN: 0374214077
Category: Literature & Fiction
Subcategory: Genre Fiction
Language: English
Publisher: Farrar Straus & Giroux; 1st edition (August 1, 1997)
Pages: 306 pages