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A Map of Glass download epub

by Jane Urquhart


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INTERNATIONAL ACCLAIM FOR A Map of Glass Urquhart’s passion for the past and the land are at full poetic play . Urquhart’s considerable following, or anyone willing to be seduced by her cadence. ill be moved by the truth in her story and enchanted by its beauty.

INTERNATIONAL ACCLAIM FOR A Map of Glass Urquhart’s passion for the past and the land are at full poetic play in this intricate story of love, loss and memory. Publishers Weekly (starred. A Map of Glass is carefully observed, finely nuanced, and deeply involving. Richard Bachmann, A Different Drummer Books.

Jane Urquhart is the bestselling author of five internationally acclaimed, award-winning novels. A Map of Glass ebbs and flows between the present and families of late19th century Canadian timber barons who not only forged a nation, they raped it as well. She is also the author of a collection of short fiction, Storm Glass, and three books of poetry. She lives in Southwestern Ontario. Above all else, A Map of Glass is exquisitely imagined and crafted with a structure that shows us both the frailty of stories and the permanence of history -that the legacy of the past can both breath meaning into or suffocate those who must live with its consequences.

About the Author: Jane Urquhart is the bestselling author of five internationally acclaimed, award-winning novels. She is the winner of numerous awards and has been short listed for the Booker Prize and the International IMPAC award. Библиографические данные.

Jane Urquhart's stunning new novel weaves two parallel stories, one. Jane Urquhart's stunning new novel weaves two parallel stories, one set in contemporary Toronto and Prince Edward County, Ontario, the other in the nineteenth century on the northern shores of Lake Ontario. Sylvia Bradley was rescued from her parents' house by a doctor attracted to and challenged by her withdrawn ways.

We keep the details on file while you are here, the clerk told her, but you can pay with cash if you wish when you leave. In five days, she said. She might need a full week. She could bargain later. Once inside the room she took stock of her surroundings, wanting to learn the objects with which she would live.

Jane Urquhart doesn't title individual chapters, instead she divides her novel into three large sections . When discussing the name of the last section, "A Map of Glass," also consider why Urquhart chose that as the title of the book

Jane Urquhart doesn't title individual chapters, instead she divides her novel into three large sections: "The Revelations"; "The Bog Commissioners"; "A Map of Glass". Look at each of these sections and discuss why it is given that particular title. When discussing the name of the last section, "A Map of Glass," also consider why Urquhart chose that as the title of the book. The epigraph of the novel tells us that the "logical, two dimensional picture" provided by a diagram, plan, or map "rarely looks like the thing it stands fo. Which characters make maps or diagrams? What function do they serve? How do they relate to some of the book's central concerns?

Jane Urquhart, the Canadian author of several acclaimed novels including The Stone . Julie Wheelwright's books include 'The Fatal Lover: Mata Hari and the myth of female espionage'. Independent culture newsletter.

Jane Urquhart, the Canadian author of several acclaimed novels including The Stone Carvers, has now written a brilliantly multi-layered narrative that delves deeply into the meaning of memory. Interleaved with the contemporary story, Urquhart recreates Andrew's memoir, peppered with its own cast of dynamic characters who inhabit a place and time that lives now only through his words. Her sense of the larger issues of history and the fragility of human relationships within them are, at moments, deeply poignant.

In the typical Urquhart mold, A Map of Glass is a novel about the past, the land, and art, subjects found in many of her previous novels. A young artist, Jerome, is alone on Timber Island to take photos of temporary art creations, or "absences," he has dug in the snow. While there, he finds the body of Andrew Woodman, an Alzheimer's sufferer, frozen in the ice of the river.

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From the author of the best-selling, award-winning The Stone Carvers and The Underpainter comes a new novel that explores love, loss, and the transitory nature of place. After Jerome, a young artist on a remote island retreat, discovers Andrew Woodman s dead body frozen in the ice, he meets the elderly man s former lover, Sylvia, who is curious about the circumstances surrounding Andrew s death.

Jane Urquhart’s stunning new novel weaves two parallel stories, one set in contemporary Toronto and Prince Edward County, Ontario, the other in the nineteenth century on the northern shores of Lake Ontario.Sylvia Bradley was rescued from her parents’ house by a doctor attracted to and challenged by her withdrawn ways. Their subsequent marriage has nourished her, but ultimately her husband’s care has formed a kind of prison. When she meets Andrew Woodman, a historical geographer, her world changes. A year after Andrew’s death, Sylvia makes an unlikely connection with Jerome McNaughton, a young Toronto artist whose discovery of Andrew’s body on a small island at the mouth of the St. Lawrence River unlocks a secret in his own past. After Sylvia finds Jerome in Toronto, she shares with him the story of her unusual childhood and of her devastating and ecstatic affair with Andrew, a man whose life was irrevocably affected by the decisions of the past. At the breathtaking centre of the novel is the compelling tale of Andrew’s forebears. We meet his great-great-grandfather, Joseph Woodman, whose ambitions brought him from England to the northeastern shores of Lake Ontario, during the days of the flourishing timber and shipbuilding industries; Joseph’s practical, independent and isolated daughter, Annabel; and his son, Branwell, an innkeeper and a painter. It is Branwell’s eventual liaison with an orphaned French-Canadian woman that begins the family’s new generation and sets the stage for future events. A novel about loss and the transitory nature of place, A Map of Glass is vivid with evocative prose and haunting imagery — a lake of light on a wooden table; a hotel gradually buried by sand; a fully clothed man frozen in an iceberg; a blind woman tracing her fingers over a tactile map. Containing all of the elements for which Jane Urquhart’s writing is celebrated, it stands as her richest, most accomplished novel to date.From the Hardcover edition.

Comments: (7)

Vojar
The very best modern writers' prose challenge as well as illumine. Since at least the advent of Woolf and Joyce (some say Henry James started it all) serious writers seem bent upon interior monologues, temporality and introspection. One of the noteworthy triumphs of 20th century literature is the mind over matter. Dialogue and linear narrative have taken a back seat to rembrances of things past, stream of consciousness and tidal narratives that ebb and flow through space and time. Genre bending virtuosoes like David Mitchell charter new territory with each book.

Add Jane Urquhart to your list of those writers who can do more than tell a story. A Map of Glass, the story of Sylvia and Jerome and how happenstance brings them together is nothing less than a brilliant accomplishment. One that takes us into the mind and experience of a character suffering an undiagnosed affliction akin to a mixture of OCD and autism. A story that skirts around the dark interiors of photographer determined upon suppressing an unhappy past that continually threatens to boil over and scald.

A Map of Glass ebbs and flows between the present and families of late19th century Canadian timber barons who not only forged a nation, they raped it as well. Above all else, A Map of Glass is exquisitely imagined and crafted with a structure that shows us both the frailty of stories and the permanence of history --that the legacy of the past can both breath meaning into or suffocate those who must live with its consequences. Like all great books this is not always easy to read. I had particular trouble with the first few chapters, impatient to see the first parts of the puzzle fit. Struggling a bit until settling into the author's cadences and rhythms.

That effort though is not is not only worth it (viz. James, Woolf, Garcia Marquez, Nabokov and Mitchell), it is a joy.
great ant
[5 stars plus] This wondrous and evocative novel begins with a man walking over the ice to a distant island. He is so stricken with Alzheimer's that he cannot even remember his own name, Andrew, but the four pages in which Jane Urquhart describes his situation are almost poetry: "The whole unnamed world is so beautiful to him now that he is aware he has left behind vast, unremembered territories, certain faces, and a full orchestra of sounds that he has loved." He is walking, as one of the other characters later remarks, toward his past. The book that follows will be the slow uncovering of that past, not only as it applies to Andrew and his forebears, but by extension to the whole of Canada, its natural resources, and the way of life that squandered then vanished with them.

All this will be the subject of the central section of this three-part novel, an elegantly-told family saga beginning with an English immigrant, Joseph Woodman, who founds a timber and ship-building empire on an island just where Lake Ontario flows into the St. Lawrence River. But the main focus is on Joseph's son, Branwell, Andrew's great-grandfather. Trained in Paris as an artist, he spends the rest of his life on an uneasy balance between art and commerce, two opposing viewpoints that emerge as one of the philosophical axes of the book. Branwell's sister Annabelle in a way has it easier, because as a woman she is not expected to enter the business and so can devote herself to painting -- but all she paints are her father's ships and their destruction by water, fire, or time.

Were the novel confined to this historical story, it would still be a very good one. What makes it remarkable are the framing sections set in the present. Andrew, it turns out, was a landscape geographer, a kind of archaeologist who reconstructs earlier lives from the traces people leave in their surrounding world. Jerome McNaughton, who finds Andrew's frozen body, is an artist engaged in similar pursuits, making careful excavations, taking photographs, and building imaginative reconstructions. Both, in their different ways, make maps. So does Urquhart's primary character, Sylvia, who makes tactile maps for a blind friend, Julia, so that she may explore her landscape by feel. It is Sylvia's closeness to Andrew that brings her to Jerome's studio and begins the process of linking past to present -- a linkage that Urquhart reinforces by a web of subtle cross-references that are intricate without ever being obtrusive.

Julia is blind; Andrew developed Alzheimer's; Annabelle was lame; Sylvia appears to suffer from a form of autism; even the young and apparently healthy Jerome will turn out to have been spiritually crippled by the legacy of an alcoholic father. The most amazing of Urquhart's many feats of alchemy is that she manages to turn these apparent disabilities into gifts. The reader turns the pages with wonder, enthralled by the writer's inexhaustible ability to see familiar things in a new way. Central to it all is Sylvia, whose social limitations and fear of change will nonetheless turn her into the virtual author of a story of love and family whose very subject is change.

A MAP OF GLASS is even greater than Urquhart's excellent previous novel, THE STONE CARVERS. Both share a three-part structure; both go back into Canadian history; and both are centered around a work of visual art. The underlying inspiration here is a 1969 piece by Robert Smithson entitled "A Map of Broken Glass (Atlantis)," an 18-by-15 foot pile of broken window panes that suggests the debris of lost civilizations, but which nonetheless catches the light in unexpected ways and glistens with a mystery of its own. Urquhart's MAP is also a lament for the past, but its quiet glow of consolation is nothing short of a miracle.
A Map of Glass download epub
Genre Fiction
Author: Jane Urquhart
ISBN: 077108644X
Category: Literature & Fiction
Subcategory: Genre Fiction
Language: English
Publisher: Emblem Editions (August 24, 2010)
Pages: 392 pages