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by Juilene Osborne-McKnight


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by. Cormac Mac Airt, King of Ireland, fl. 227-260, Druids and Druidism, Christian converts, Mythology, Celtic, Women, Kings and rulers, Women, Celtic, Women priests. Internet Archive Books. Uploaded by AprilV on January 5, 2010. SIMILAR ITEMS (based on metadata).

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Daughter of Ireland continues Juilene Osborne-McKnight's exploration of Irish history, combining .

Juilene Osborne-McKnight is an accomplished folklorist, storyteller, and teacher on Celtic culture and history. She resides in Pennsylvania. Song of Ireland is her fourth novel. Библиографические данные. Juilene Osborne-McKnight. Tom Doherty Associates, 2006.

Juilene Osborne-McKnight. In that spirit of profound gratitude, my daughter and I are giving away a thank you book on Goodreads that will contain her one of a kind drawing on the frontspiece of the book which we will both sign

Juilene Osborne-McKnight. In that spirit of profound gratitude, my daughter and I are giving away a thank you book on Goodreads that will contain her one of a kind drawing on the frontspiece of the book which we will both sign. We can't thank every reader individually, but this is our symbolic way of saying thank you to everyone who has supported The Story We Carry in Our Bones: Irish History for Americans

Juilene Osborne-McKnight. The Sons of Mil long held the dream of the Island of Destiny close to their hearts

Juilene Osborne-McKnight. The Sons of Mil long held the dream of the Island of Destiny close to their hearts. A dream perhaps, but to these restless, adventuring people it was a shining emerald prize to be won by those who were brave or foolhardy enough to sail to the very ends of the known world. For the Bard Amergin and his people that dream comes true.

I am the wind which breathes on the water. Osborne-McKnight has crafted an engaging young heroine who chronicles both Celtic mythology and early pagan/Christian theology through her travels, and re-creates a world whose conflicts over power, religion, and law are as immediate and far-reaching as those same conflicts in our own time. At the Publisher's request, this title is being sold without Digital Rights Management Software (DRM) applied.

Juilene Osborne-McKnight knows her source material well, but never lets it get in the way of the story. Complex and unpredictable, Song of Ireland offers a satisfying blend of history, myth and solid storytelling. The last section, when Amergin and his family get to Eire was also good. Since this was about the bard Amergin, I was hoping for more of a storytelling aspect to the story. Like "I Am of Irelaunde," one of McKnight's other books, which I really liked.

I am the wind which breathes on the water.I am the swell of the sea.I am the light of the sun.I am the point of the battle spear.I am the God who gives fires to the mind.Who announces the ages of the moon?Who speaks to the setting of the sun?I, only I.Aislinn ni Sorar, druid priestess of ancient Ireland, is a visionary. Raised according to the ancient ways and seeking to use her gifts to keep the old magic strong, she has the power to part the mists of time and see events that might shape a nation. But Aislinn’s own past is shrouded in mystery, and her quest to discover that past will bring her pain, as well as true love, and will set in motion a chain of events that will alter both her own future and that of her beloved Ireland.For there is a new spirit upon the land whose presence heralds a rendering--and a remaking--of this world. His way had been foretold long ago and threatens to change everything. And Aislinn is at the heart of that change. Will she give up everything that she loves to help her people find the true God, or will she turn to the dark forces that threaten to keep the old ways at any cost?Daughter of Ireland continues Juilene Osborne-McKnight's exploration of Irish history, combining fine historical research with skillful storytelling. Her focus this time is none other than Cormac mac Art, ancient and venerated King of Ireland, and the path the Irish people follow to find the one true God. Osborne-McKnight has crafted an engaging young heroine who chronicles both Celtic mythology and early pagan/Christian theology through her travels, and re-creates a world whose conflicts over power, religion, and law are as immediate and far-reaching as those same conflicts in our own time.

Comments: (7)

Celace
This is an interesting story in a time I haven't heard much about: 250 A.D.-ish Ireland; 200 years before St. Patrick. Clearly well researched and it sounds like what I think druid life would be like. Story is about love and finding God among the many gods. Writing style is a bit different than usual and made for a refreshing read. I liked it but I was expecting more Druid magic and so it left me a little flat. Saying more than that would give too much away, other than to say that it's not fantasy, it's historical fiction. A nice story, lots of suspense, lots of love. So it was magical even though there was no magic.
Skyway
One of my absolute favorite books. Juliene has a way of bringing her books to life; she sucks you into another world and captures every detail superbly. I always recommend this book, and all of her books.
Gozragore
Enjoyed the story immensley! I laughed. I cried. I felt the pain and heartfelt love. It was an awesome blend of myth, mystery, love story, and historical references. I couldn't put it down.
Fonceiah
all of the author's books have been great. Have enjoyed all of them.
BoberMod
I read this novel right after finishing my most recent re-reading of "The Mists of Avalon," and the two books are a study in contrasts in terms of the authors' respective approaches to the transition from the pagan religion to Christianity in Britain and Ireland, respectively. While "The Mists of Avalon" certainly has its narrative flaws and could have benefited greatly from a disciplined (and disciplining) editor, it is far more nuanced in its approach to the problem of good, evil, and human agency as lived by the pagans and the Christians in the story. In "Daughter of Ireland," Brighid is the only pagan Goddess who makes the transition to Christianity, and the druids who do not willingly adapt (or submit) to the "new god" (who is never named, but we know who He is) are simply evil. They start out evil, and they remain evil, right until the bitter end.

The Celts were a very passionate and, yes, violent people - but not because they lacked the concept of monotheism. For people with a sense of connection with each other and with something greater than themselves, there is nothing inherently evil about worshipping a triune goddess instead of a triune God - or no God, for that matter. In the hands of a far more skillful novelist, the transition from the old religion to Christianity could have presented an opportunity to explore how complex human beliefs are and how we struggle to accept each other's diverse belief systems without harming each other. Centuries after Cormac Mac Art and Fionn Mac Cumhaill, we're no closer than they were to resolving this struggle.
Lo◘Ve
While searching through the romance novel section at the Book Store, I came across a book that made me say, "Oooh...". Daughter of Ireland first caught my attention because of the pretty cover (Yes, I'm one of those people who firmly disagrees with the statement, "You can't judge a book by its cover.") Then, I noticed the title had the word "Ireland" in it, which prompted me to read the back cover of the book. After doing so, I just had to buy it. However, was it all I was hoping it to be? Not quite.
Set in about 250 AD, when Cormac Mac Art ruled as high king of Ireland and the country was protected the Fianna, the fierce and legendary army of Ireland led by Fionn Mac Cumhail, the plot of the story is of the intertwining fates of Aislinn ni Sorar and Eoghan Mac Aiden and the forces of darkness that could tear them apart. Aislinn is a druid priestess, loved and well respected throughout all of Eire; Eoghan is a warrior-poet of the Ard-ri (high king) and also a member of the Fianna. Eoghan's father killed Aislinn's father in a battle game when she was but five years old. Her mother took a death-fast, meaning that she was entombed alive with her dead husband and eventually starved to death. However, before she took her death-fast, she sent for Eoghan, who was seventeen at the time, and told him to take Aislinn to the druid Aodhfin the Wise to keep her safe from Banbh, a dark druid who pledged his allegiance to Morigu, the goddess of battle, death, and war. Aodhfin trained Aislinn in the druii ways, then sent her on a journey with only a cryptic chant to guide her: "From the place of darkness will come a child to light your journey. To the place of fire will come a man bearing fire for the body and the mind. Between darkness and light, you are the still point." Aislinn must figure out the meaning behind Aodhfin's riddle in order to become completely safe from the darkness and have true happiness.
Confusing? Maybe a little. The book is wonderful until about three-fourths of the way through, when the story begins to jump ahead six months to five years at a time. To me, it appears as though Juilene Osbourne-McKnight tired of writing and just wanted to end the book quickly.
However, Osborne-McKnight didn't just make up characters and a story off the top of her head. The story is remarkably believable, for it is very evident she did her research on ancient Ireland before writing this book. She used real people as her characters and real events to shape the plot of the book. Her descriptions of druii rituals and observations of their holidays are absolutely splendid. She took the time to conquer the tideous tasks of translating old Gaelic words and phrases into English and finding the pronunciation of nearly every name that appeared in the book. There is even a glossary at the end of the book for reference, as well as the bibliography of books she used for research.
The character descriptions are excellent, right down to the tiniest detail. Osborne-McKnight made it seem as though I had jumped into one of the character's heads; I could almost feel what they were thinking. The physical descriptions were wonderful, too. The way they wore their hair, the druii robes and clothing, the colors each clan wore...positively wonderful. It really made me wish I had been alive at that period in history, for I know I would have loved it.
Do you like historical romance novels? Are you interested in the Old ways and the religion of the Others? Are you enthralled by the constant battle between good and evil, light and dark? If so, then you definitely need to read this book.
Briciraz
I just finished reading this book and I loved it! Ancient Ireland is not a setting which is found in a lot of books and I found the tale very interesting. I really felt like I could picture virtually every aspect of the story while I was reading it.
The female version of the legacy of St. Patrick who drove the snakes out of Ireland ... and converted pagan celts into Christians. The spirit of the one true God heralds itself on the Emerald Isle and one woman's role in lighting the way.
Daughter of Ireland download epub
Genre Fiction
Author: Juilene Osborne-McKnight
ISBN: 076530127X
Category: Literature & Fiction
Subcategory: Genre Fiction
Language: English
Publisher: Forge Books; 1st edition (March 6, 2002)
Pages: 304 pages