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by August Derleth,H.P. Lovecraft


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In fact, the stories were written exclusively by August Derleth between roughly 1953 and 1966.

In fact, the stories were written exclusively by August Derleth between roughly 1953 and 1966. They were claimed by Derleth to be "posthumous collaborations" based on unpublished Lovecraftian writing

Электронная книга "The Watchers Out of Time: Fifteen soul-chilling tales by H. P. Lovecraft", H. Lovecraft, August Derleth

Электронная книга "The Watchers Out of Time: Fifteen soul-chilling tales by H. Lovecraft, August Derleth. Эту книгу можно прочитать в Google Play Книгах на компьютере, а также на устройствах Android и iOS. Выделяйте текст, добавляйте закладки и делайте заметки, скачав книгу "The Watchers Out of Time: Fifteen soul-chilling tales by H. Lovecraft" для чтения в офлайн-режиме.

Derleth published the stories in this collection as 'posthumous collaborations' with H. Lovecraft, which could charitably . Lovecraft, which could charitably called stretching the truth. The reality is that Derleth took story. The Watchers Out of Time: Fifteen soul-chilling tales by H. Lovecraft.

Derleth and Lovecraft had been friends, and when Lovecraft passed away, Derleth finished Lovecraft's . The true title of this anthology should be "Tales written by August Derleth based on ideas thrown away by .

Derleth and Lovecraft had been friends, and when Lovecraft passed away, Derleth finished Lovecraft's unfinished sentences/ideas that Lovecraft had jotted down. To be honest a First and foremost, this collection of short stories is mostly Derleth's work. Lovecraft" - Similar to Phil's works to advance other writers for his own monetary (and egotistical) gain, Derleth (who at the time owned most of Lovecraft's works based upon contracts with Arkham House publishing) took old ideas that never bore fruit.

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Read unlimited books and audiobooks on the web, iPad, iPhone and Android. Witches’ Hollow A new schoolteacher puts his soul in peril while trying to save one of his students from a ravenous creature. Read on the Scribd mobile app. Download the free Scribd mobile app to read anytime, anywhere. Publisher: Random House Publishing GroupReleased: Oct 14, 2008ISBN: 9780345485717Format: book. carousel previous carousel next. Tales of Mystery & The Supernatural.

Lovecraft is the twentieth century’s dark and baroque prince

Lovecraft is the twentieth century’s dark and baroque prince. Softcover, 304 pages. offered by: International News Books & Gifts We Are Professional Bookdealers Located in Flint, Michigan Find Us Online at: int-news.

Howard Phillips Lovecraft, 1890 - 1937 H. Lovecraft was born on August 20. .In 1935, his first book, a collection of related novellas entitled Place of Hawks, was published. Lovecraft was born on August 20, 1890 in Providence, Rhode Island. His mother was Sarah Susan Phillips Lovecraft and his father was Winfield Scott Lovecraft, a traveling salesman for Gorham & Co. Silversmtihs. A short time later, he began writing a monthly astronomy column for The Pawtuxet Valley Gleaner - a rural paper. He also wrote columns for The Providence Tribune (1906-08), The Providence Evening News (1914-18), The Asheville (. Gazette-News (1915).

August Derleth (February 24 1909 – July 4 1971) was an American writer and anthologist

August Derleth (February 24 1909 – July 4 1971) was an American writer and anthologist. Though best remembered as Howard Phillips Lovecraft's literary executor and for his own contributions to the Cthulhu Mythos genre of horror, Derleth was a prolific writer in several genres, including historical fiction and detective fiction. The son of William Julius Derleth and his wife Rose Louise Volk, he grew up in Sauk City, Wisconsin. At the age of 16, he sold his first story to Weird Tales magazine.

Title: Watchers Out of Time and Others Author(s): H P Lovecraft, August William Derleth ISBN: 0-87054-033-5 . October 2008 : USA Paperback.

October 2008 : USA Paperback.

Venture at your own risk into a realm where the sun sinks into oblivion–and all that is unholy, unearthly, and unspeakable rises. These rare, hard-to-find collaborations of cosmic terror are back in print, including• Wentworth’s Day A fellow figures his debt to a dead man is null and void, until he discovers just how terrifying interest rates can be.• The Shuttered Room A sophisticated gentleman must settle his grandfather’s estate, only to find that the house shelters dark secrets.• The Dark Brotherhood A beautiful woman and her companion meet the likes of Edgar Allan Poe, in a tale as terrifying as anything Poe himself ever created.• Innsmouth Clay A sculptor returns from Paris to create a statue not entirely of this world–and not at all under his control.• Witches’ Hollow A new schoolteacher puts his soul in peril while trying to save one of his students from a ravenous creature.

Comments: (7)

Gavinrage
If you are in to the Lovecraftian mythos, this is a good book for you. The only negative thing that I can think of to say about it is that some of the stories feel like a direct ripoff of some of Lovecraft's stories, which means that a lot of the plots and endings are highly predictable if you are familiar with the original Lovecraft stories. That being said, a decent percentage or the stories are completely original, and the ones that aren't still manage to be fun to read
Wiliniett
As I'm sure most people buying this know, this isn't really H.P. Lovecraft's writings, it's August Derleth's, expanding on Lovecraft's existing stories as well some some ideas Lovecraft never got around to writing. And I guess a few August Derleth originals.

Derleth is not a bad writer, but he is a bad mimicker of Lovecraft. So the most Lovecraftian of the stories are probably the worst. "The Shadow out of Space", for instance, is essentially the same plot as "The Shadow out of Time", only all the mystery and creepiness sucked out.

Probably the best of the Lovecraft-ish tales is "The Shuttered Room", which does a pretty good job of combining The Dunwich Horror and Shadow Over Innsmouth.

Far too many of the tales (including that one, actually) use the same exact plot: Person inherits a property, then discovers that the person he inherited it from was up to no good, which continues to happen beyond the grave.

Lovecraft almost used that device a couple of times, but he changed things a bit (like in The Call of Cthulhu, the person simple inherits some notes), when Derleth uses the devices, there's no subtlety.

One story, "The Lamp of Alhazred" is a very nice homage and tribute to Lovecraft. There a few other Innsmouth ones, one actually pretty decent ("Innsmouth Clay")

The title story is unfinished, and on the face of it, seems to have a very similar plot as "The Lurker at the Threshold" (a novel by Derleth under Lovecraft's name), only told from the narrator's point of view and set in Dunwich.

All in all, if you are a Lovecraft fan or a completest, it's worth picking up. But for most others it a pass.
Billy Granson
_The Watchers Out of Time_ (2oo8) is a collection of fifteen old fashioned supernatural stories credited to H.P LOVECRAFT and august derleth. In fact, the stories were written exclusively by August Derleth between roughly 1953 and 1966. They were claimed by Derleth to be "posthumous collaborations" based on unpublished Lovecraftian writing. But Lovecraft scholars like S. T. Joshi long ago established that Lovecraft's contributions to these tales was minimal-- sometimes amounting to only a line or two. All of the stories in this book have been listed as "spurious Lovecraft stories," though publishers never seem to tire of palming them off as genuine Lovecraft stories. They range in quality from the awful ("The Shuttered Room" and "The Horror from the Middle Span"), to the routine pastiche ("The Shadow Out of Space" and "The Peabody Inheritance"), to the mildly imaginative ("The Survivor" and "The Gable Window"), to the above average ("The Fisherman of Falcon Point" and "The Lamp of Alhazred"). Since I have discussed many of these stories and their origins in some detail in reviews of other collections,* I have decided to look at Derleth's stories from another angle in this review. How well does he handle Lovecraftian diction-- words like cyclopean, eldrich, and antediluvean? (I systematically eliminated specialized words like Necronomicon, Dagon, Cthulhu, and Abdul Alhazred.)

Let us start by looking at the diction describing two monsters appearing in these pages:

"There, squatting in the midst of the tumbled bedding from that long-abandoned bed, sat a monstrous, leathery-skinned creature that was neither frog nor man, one gorged with food, with blood slavering from its batrachian jaws and upon its webbed fingers-- a monstrous entity that had strong, powerfully long arms, grown from its bestial body like those of a frog, and tapering off into a man's fingers, save for the webbing between the fingers..." ("The Shuttered Room,"158)

"This was the thing I had killed. Half-man, half-saurian, it was a ghastly travesty upon what had once been a human being. Its clothes were split and torn by the horrible mutilations of the flesh, by the crusted skin which had burst its bonds, its hands and unshod feet were flat, powerful in appearance, claw-like. I gazed in speechless terror at the shuddersome tail-like appendage which pushed bluntly out from the base of the spine, at the terrible elongated, crocodilian jaw, to which still grew a tuft of hair..." ("The Survivor," 24)

The first creature is a froglike monster (and therefore an amphibian). The second is a crocodile-type monster (and therefore a reptile). Derleth is thus perfectly correct to use "batrachian" ("amphibious") to describe the first creature. But in the buildup to the second tale, Derleth not only uses reptilian adjectives but also "batrachian" and "ichthic" ("fishlike") to describe his monster. The words may be visually impressive, but the biology isn't very sound.

But when we get to "The Fisherman of Falcon Point," we are clearly back to the word as it is meant to be used, describing a strange company of creatures off Devil's Reef, "neither entirely human nor entirely batrachian, amphibian creatures that passed through the water..." (165). They are gilled but leave webbed footprints on land.

The word "rugose" ("ruffled") has only one specialized use in the book that I know of-- but a noteworthy one. "Rugose cones" (102) is repeatedly used to describe the giant aliens from the library in "The Shadow Out of Space". I have not checked to see if Lovecraft used the word in "The Shadow Out of Time," but I bet he did.

"Eldrich" (meaning old and uncanny) is a word that Derleth loves to use. A partial listing of this word includes: "eldrich things" (4), "eldrich rites" (15), "eldrich customs" (32), and "eldrich books" (99). Perhaps I should say to readers at this point that "eldrich" never modifies _anything_ good. So if you are approached by a dark stranger with reptilian eyes and cold, fishlike breath and webbed fingers who offers you a position as a member of an eldrich organization, _turn him down flat_. Then pack your bags and get out of town while the getting is good.

I was never able to detect the use of "cyclopean" in this collection. But I did detect the use of "megalithic" (117) masonry to describe the alien architecture in "The Shadow Out of Space" and several uses of the word "colossal". Nor did I spot the use of "antediluvian" (before the flood). But there was a pretty impressive description of the "primeval Old Ones" (25). Here are some other Lovecraftian words that I have culled from the collection at random: "miasma" (13), "hallucinatory" (14), "gambrel-roofed" (25), "compendious" (31), "leathern" (58), "mummified" (58), "subterranean"(87), "phenomenom" (76), and "cataclysmic" (92).

So how well does August Derleth do when it comes to handling Lovecraftian diction? Pretty well, actually. I suspect that he uses some of the words a bit more than Lovecraft himself actually used them in his own stories. There are a few places where he slips over the meaning of the words. But not many. On the whole, his usage of words like batrachian, saurian, eldrich, ichthic, rugose, and subterranean seem to be those of a writer who knows their meaning.

You can argue that Derleth's diction is not as _creative_ as that of Lovecraft. But this is surely nit-picking. It is certainly a fairly good imitation. In this collection, you will find an assortment of Elder Gods, eldrich rituals, and batrachian, saurian, ichthic, and skeletal creatures. Plus several witches and warlocks. They may not be authentic Lovecraft stories. But they are authentic Lovecraft imitations.

*See my reviews of _The Survivor & Others_ (1957), by H.P. Lovecraft and August Derleth and _The Shuttered Room and Other Tales of Horror_(1971), by H.P. Lovecraft and August Derleth
Andromakus
Many of the stories started to blend together and seem to be repetitive with slight variations. Please note this is largely a Derleth book which I was expecting.
Galubel
Glad to find some August Derleth, but this book only has one HP Lovecraft story in it. If it is pure Lovecraft you are looking for look to another book.
Whilingudw
Okay for Derleth pastisch fans.
fire dancer
HPL is the best
Good read but...
Good but not as good as HPL. Derleth and friends can't quite plumb the depths of horror like Lovecraft.
The Watchers Out of Time: Fifteen soul-chilling tales by download epub
Genre Fiction
Author: August Derleth,H.P. Lovecraft
ISBN: 0345485696
Category: Literature & Fiction
Subcategory: Genre Fiction
Language: English
Publisher: Del Rey; First Printing - First Thus edition (October 14, 2008)
Pages: 304 pages