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Tun-Huang: A Novel download epub

by Jean Oda Moy,Yasushi Inoue


Epub Book: 1566 kb. | Fb2 Book: 1676 kb.

Yasushi Inoue Tun-Huang is a modern re-telling of an old myth.

Tun-Huang is a modern re-telling of an old myth. In the early 20th century, a hoard of early Buddhist sutras was discovered in the Tun-Huang caves of western China. This story attempts to recreate the. Jean Oda Moy was born in Washington State and spent her early years in Seattle, moving to Japan shortly before the outbreak of World War II. She is also the translator of Yasushi Inoue’sChronicle of My Mother and Shirobamba: A Childhood In Old Japan.

Yasushi Inoue (井上 靖 Inoue Yasushi, May 6, 1907 – January 29, 1991) was a Japanese writer whose range of genres included poetry . PagesPublic FigureYasushi InouéPosts.

Jean Oda Moy was born in Washington State and spent her early years in Seattle, moving to Japan shortly before the outbreak of World War II. She is also the translator of Yasushi Inoue's Chronicle of My Mother and Shirobamba: A Childhood In Old Japan. Damion Searls is the author of What We Were Doing and Where We Were Going and an award-winning translator, most recently of Rainer Maria Rilke's The Inner Sky Poems, Notes, Dreams, Jon Fosse's Aliss at the Fire, and Hans Keilson's Comedy in a Minor Key.

Tun-Huang (Paperback). Yasushi Inoue (author), Jean Oda Moy (translator), Damion Searls (author of preface). Your local Waterstones may have stock of this item. Paperback 224 Pages, Published: 30/11/2010.

Inoue Yasushi, Moy Jean Oda, Searls Damion.

In Tun-huang, the great modern Japanese novelist Yasushi Inoue tells the . Tun-Huang the novel has a good reputation Inoue is famous for his serious historical fiction of ancient Japan and th. .

In Tun-huang, the great modern Japanese novelist Yasushi Inoue tells the story of Chao Hsing-te, a young Chinese man whose accidental failure to take the More than a thousand years ago, an extraordinary trove of early Buddhist sutras and other scriptures was secreted away in caves near the Silk Road city of Tun-huang. Tun-Huang the novel has a good reputation

Prices may vary for AK and H. Tun-huang is a famous novel by a very famous contemporary Japanese author of d work.

Prices may vary for AK and H. Learn more about free shipping. Yasushi Inoue (1907–1991) was born on Hokkaidō, Japan’s northernmost island, the eldest child of an army medical officer. After a youth devoted to poetry and judo, Inoue sat, unsuccessfully, for the entrance exam to the Kyushu Imperial University Medical School. Here is a chance for 'westerners' to enter the world of ancient China and to experience its historic years of turmoil and to brush faintly against the cultural reverance for Bhuddism.

Finding books BookSee BookSee - Download books for free. Inoue Yasushi, Moy Jean Oda, Searls Damion.

Unglamorous, unadorned lives such as this form the focus of Yasushi Inoue's tenderly observed, elegantly distilled short stories - two of which are appearing in English for the first time.

Life of a Counterfeiter. Unglamorous, unadorned lives such as this form the focus of Yasushi Inoue's tenderly observed, elegantly distilled short stories - two of which are appearing in English for the first time. With a haunting emotional intensity, they offer glimpses of love lost and lives wasted. These three luminous, compassionate tales showcase the mastery and exquisite talent of one of Japan's most beloved writers.

A disillusioned scholar wanders off to the western desert frontier of eleventh-century China and participates in the struggle between the Hsi-hsia tribes and the powerful Sung dynasty

Comments: (7)

Bladebringer
This quiet little (209 pages including the epilogue) story runs deep.

The line of this tale is easy to describe: an 11th century scholar wanders west into Central Asia and finds himself caught up in conflicts between established and emerging empires not unlike that region experiences today. Along the way, the scholar is drafted into an army, briefly falls in love with a girl who may have sacrificed herself for him, falls in with a fierce warrior, and spirits to safety a library of Buddhist scrolls before the final battle of the story. There are, of course, warriors, villains, and otherwise conflicted characters along the route.

But that's not what this story is about, although it can provide a satisfactory read just for the story line.

This story, delivered in simple, short, and direct language, not unlike the brush strokes in calligraphy, tells the tale of a man seeking, but not knowing what he seeks, until he finds it. What he finds in the end of his story is a calm that comes with accomplishing an act that is generous, virtuous, requires great effort, demands grace under pressure, an insightful understanding of events around him, and finally an understanding of how the ebb and flow of the conflicts that define the age and individuals living in those times are connected. Practitioners of Buddhism will see the six perfections (generosity, ethics, perseverance, patience, meditative concentration, and wisdom) in this story.

But even for those not schooled in Buddhism, this historical fiction, I think, will create a sense of calm, even after reading about the strife and conflicts detailed in this lesson of impermanence.

The ideas of this text are subtly woven into it. In contrast to many tales set in an historical setting, the characters in Tun-Huang are subtly drawn and complex. The virtuous have fatal flaws. The wicked perform virtuous deeds. The unguided realize purpose and direction. Relationships, cities, even ancient civilizations are impermanent and seldom accurately recalled in memory.

I found this a most rewarding read. It leaves me with a sense of peace and calm, not unlike after a good meditation.
Thomand
You have to admire our protagonist-hero (Hsing-te), an intelligent man who misses his calling when he falls asleep waiting for his imperial exam. This chance event changes his life and sees him on the far western frontier of China, fighting with the enemy's army. He is tied to his horse each time he goes into battle as he faints after he discharges his weapons; he is wounded, but still survives. A little surprising given the apparent 80% death rate in his vanguard division - no wonder he developed a fatalistic approach to his life.

The book moves through twists and turns, all contrivances to take us to the known outcome of preserving the Buddhist sutras from the invading army by secreting them away in the caves at Tun-Huang. All of which makes for an anti-climax as you know Hsing-Te has to survive all until at least that fateful day.
Nicely written and fast-paced - the author's descriptive prose has you feeling the frontier towns, with their narrow passages of maze-like streets and mud walls. The urgency of saving the sutras from the coming fires becomes a little repetitious towards the end, but overall an enjoyable tale that leaves you wanting to learn more about the Tun-Huang caves and the mysterious library of scrolls.
Brannylv
The early twentieth-century find of some 40,000 ancient scrolls and documents in the caves outside Dunhuang (Tun-Huang) fascinated the eminent Japanese writer Yasushi Inoue. The cache included the first printed book, unknown Buddhist scriptures and rare topographical and historical data. Inoue wondered how such an immense cultural treasure trove got there. History offered no explanations. So Inoue decided to fill in the blanks.

His novel, enriched by five years of research, is a tour de force of imagined history. Originally published in 1959, it brings the past to life with amazing power. I got so caught up that I'm wishing I could visit Dunhuang and feast my eyes on the art treasures of the Silk Road. Maybe I will.

The story opens in 1026. Hsing-te, a most engaging character, fails to take the final exam that would have ensured his success in the Chinese bureaucracy. Through an odd adventure (the first of many), he becomes obsessed with learning the written language of Hsi-hsia. This new nation is aggressively resisting China's dominion on the northwestern frontier. Impulsively Hsing-te sets off for this barbarous region.

On one level Tun-Huang reads like an adventure story. Yet it's also infused with romance. Hsing-te has unforgettable encounters with exotic women. He has prophetic dreams, as well, that add an element of mysticism and a sense of destiny to everything that transpires.

This New York Review Book edition is full of wonderful introductory material. It brought me up to speed on the Dunhuang discovery and Yasushi Inoue's literary achievements.

I'd highly recommend Tun-Huang to history buffs and lovers of Japanese literature.
Mojind
Tun-huang is a famous novel by a very famous contemporary Japanese author of historically-grounded work. Here is a chance for 'westerners' to enter the world of ancient China and to experience its historic years of turmoil and to brush faintly against the cultural reverance for Bhuddism. Thanks to forwards and an epilogue we also learn about a major modern archeological discovery of scrolls and other artifacts hidden in a walled-off part of a world-heritage set of caves in China. This major novel is a well-paced fictional account of the times in which the scrolls were hidden and it has scenes of warfare and descriptions of palace and bureaucratic life at the time that also hold the reader's interest throughout. This is a familiar style of historical romance that also merits its inclusion in the series published by the New York Review of Books.
Tun-Huang: A Novel download epub
Genre Fiction
Author: Jean Oda Moy,Yasushi Inoue
ISBN: 4770010869
Category: Literature & Fiction
Subcategory: Genre Fiction
Language: English
Publisher: Kodansha International Ltd ,Japan (December 31, 1983)
Pages: 213 pages