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Space Between Words: The Origins of Silent Reading (Figurae: Reading Medieval Culture) download epub

by Paul Saenger


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Saenger outlined his revolutionary thesis 15 years ago in his famous essay 'Silent Reading'; the present magisterial book retells the story step by step.

Saenger outlined his revolutionary thesis 15 years ago in his famous essay 'Silent Reading'; the present magisterial book retells the story step by step. Paleographic studies rarely command wide audiences, but Saenger tells so important a story that Space Between Words will interest all who are concerned with the history of reading or the book.

SERIES: Figurae: Reading Medieval Culture . The book concludes with the triumph of silent reading in the scholasticism and devotional practices of the late Middle Ages. Paul Saenger is George A. Poole III Curator of Rare Books at the Newberry Library, Chicago. Saenger outlined his revolutionary thesis 15 years ago in his famous essay 'Silent Reading'; the present magisterial book retells the story step by step.

Space Between Words book. Space Between Words: The Origin of Silent Reading (Figurae Reading Medieval). 080474016X (ISBN13: 9780804740166). Reading, like any human activity, has a history.

Space Between Words: The Origins of Silent Reading  . The freedom of expression that private, silent reading gave to hitherto suppressed sexual fantasies also paradoxically intensified the depth of lay religious experience" (275).

Space Between Words: The Origins of Silent Reading Stanford: Stanford University Press, 1997. Pp. xix, 480. ISBN: 0-804-72653-1. This admirable study ends with what may or not be paradox. Silent reading fosters intense private experience, and the affinity of "theos" and "eros" is not unknown. But this sentence from the last page well captures the intellectual adventure of this altogether admirable book.

By: Saenger, Paul Henry. Material type: BookSeries: Figurae (Stanford, Calif. 24 c. SBN: 0804726531 (acid-free paper). Tags from this library: No tags from this library for this title.

Reading, like any human activity, has a history. Modern reading is a silent and solitary activity

Reading, like any human activity, has a history. Modern reading is a silent and solitary activity. Read full description. See details and exclusions. See all 4 brand new listings. Space Between Words: The Origins of Silent Reading by Paul Saenger (Paperback, 2000). Brand new: lowest price.

However, few people appreciate that the practice of putting.

Title: Space Between WordsAuthor: Saenger, PaulPublisher: Stanford Univ PrPublication Date: of Pages: Binding Type: PAPERBACKLibrary of Congress: However, few people appreciate that the practice of putting.

Although Paul Saenger (the George A. Poole III Curator of Rare Books at the Newberry Library, Chicago) is a historian, his work reaches out to a wider intellectual community. I read Space Between Words: The Origins of Silent Reading through the lens of cultural anthropology, and was consistently impressed by the author's efforts to bridge interdisciplinary gaps. Space Between Words rests on the premise that there is tremendous cross-cultural and historical variety in methods of transcription, and that this variety corresponds to different neuro-physiological and cognitive processes (pp. 1-2).

Similar books and articles. Space Between Words: The Origins of Silent Reading. Silent Reading and Conceptual Confusion. Hofmann, Paul, Sinn und Geschichte. Saenger Saenger - 1938 - Studies in Philosophy and Social Science 7:228. Holly S. S. L. Joseph, Elizabeth Wonnacott, Paul Forbes & Kate Nation - 2014 - Cognition 133 (1):238-248.

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Reading, like any human activity, has a history. Modern reading is a silent and solitary activity. Ancient reading was usually oral, either aloud, in groups, or individually, in a muffled voice. The text format in which thought has been presented to readers has undergone many changes in order to reach the form that the modern Western reader now views as immutable and nearly universal. This book explains how a change in writing―the introduction of word separation―led to the development of silent reading during the period from late antiquity to the fifteenth century. Over the course of the nine centuries following Rome’s fall, the task of separating the words in continuous written text, which for half a millennium had been a function of the individual reader’s mind and voice, became instead a labor of professional readers and scribes. The separation of words (and thus silent reading) originated in manuscripts copied by Irish scribes in the seventh and eighth centuries but spread to the European continent only in the late tenth century when scholars first attempted to master a newly recovered corpus of technical, philosophical, and scientific classical texts. Why was word separation so long in coming? The author finds the answer in ancient reading habits with their oral basis, and in the social context where reading and writing took place. The ancient world had no desire to make reading easier and swifter. For various reasons, what modern readers view as advantages―retrieval of reference information, increased ability to read “difficult” texts, greater diffusion of literacy―were not seen as advantages in the ancient world. The notion that a larger portion of the population should be autonomous and self-motivated readers was entirely foreign to the ancient world’s elitist mentality. The greater part of this book describes in detail how the new format of word separation, in conjunction with silent reading, spread from the British Isles and took gradual hold in France, Germany, Italy, and Spain. The book concludes with the triumph of silent reading in the scholasticism and devotional practices of the late Middle Ages.

Comments: (2)

komandante
The ancients did not place spaces between written words. When medieval people started to do this, possibly borrowing an idea from musical notation, a chain of events ensued, both physical (both reading speed and comprehension are controlled by by what portion of a one of writing you can take in with peripheral vision) and social (silent reading began with the onset of spaced words, not that of printing, which is the received view).
Golden freddi
This book has some interesting things to say about how the practice of silent reading and the practice of putting spaces between written words are mutually reinforcing. Correspondingly, in cultures where reading is primarily reading aloud, written languages tend not to have spaces between words. But most of what the book has to say could have been said in a couple of articles. It is very repetitive and the author has a remarkable ability to use a lot of words to say very little.
Space Between Words: The Origins of Silent Reading (Figurae: Reading Medieval Culture) download epub
History & Criticism
Author: Paul Saenger
ISBN: 080474016X
Category: Literature & Fiction
Subcategory: History & Criticism
Language: English
Publisher: Stanford University Press; 1 edition (January 1, 2000)
Pages: 504 pages