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The Manuscript Found in Saragossa download epub

by Ian Maclean,Jan Potocki


Epub Book: 1886 kb. | Fb2 Book: 1453 kb.

Potocki composed the book entirely in French .

Potocki composed the book entirely in French. Comparative Criticism, volume 24, part II: Jan Potocki and "The Manuscript Found in Saragossa": Novel and Film, E. S. Shaffer, e. 2003. Irwin, Robert, The Arabian Nights: A Companion (New York: Penguin Books, 1995), 255-60.

Ian Maclean is Reader in French at the University of Oxford and a fellow of the Queen's College. He is a Professor of Renaissance Studies at Oxford with a particular interest in early modern intellectual history and Montaigne.

The translation by Ian Maclean is crisp, lucid and unfuss. beautiful volume, underlining Potocki’s forgotten . The controversies surrounding the composition of his novel The Manuscript Found in Saragossa are scarcely less dramatic than those surrounding his life. beautiful volume, underlining Potocki’s forgotten masterpiece as .

French original by the English scholar Ian Maclean. So as I came to write about Jan Potocki’s The Manuscript Found in Saragossa I was understandably perturbed when I realised that group sex is so central to the novel’s plot

French original by the English scholar Ian Maclean. So as I came to write about Jan Potocki’s The Manuscript Found in Saragossa I was understandably perturbed when I realised that group sex is so central to the novel’s plot. As much as I want to engage and entertain the reader, to build a relationship with the reader, I don’t much fancy going there.

During his lifetime Potocki never published the Manuscript in its entirety. For some reasons he felt enticed to publish his opus magnum in fragments, a fact which resulted in a confusion that prevails to this day. The fragments which he did publish in Saint-Petersburg and Paris certainly raised interest and spawned several plagiarised publications during the count's life ‒ another confusing element. Unlike many other scholars Otorowski believes that The Manuscript Found in Saragossa is not just an Enlightenment romance encapsulating a series of anecdotes told in a mise-en-abîme or frame narrative (as it is also sometimes called).

A literary masterpiece by a Polish traveller, aristocratic adventurer, political activist, ethnographer and publisher. Jan Potocki (1761-1812) used a range of literary styles - gothic, picaresque, adventure, pastoral, erotica - in his novel of es, which, like the Decameron and Tales from the Thousand and One Nights, provides entertainment on an epic scale. For more than seventy years, Penguin has been the leading publisher of classic literature in the English-speaking world. Ian Maclean is Reader in French at the University of Oxford and a fellow of the Queen's College.

If you've read the book, tell us if you agree with our analysis. Ian Maclean, London, Penguin, 1995. Potocki, . The Manuscript Found in Saragossa, trans.

The traveller, aristocratic adventurer, political activist, ethnographer and publisher Jan Potocki (1761–1815) is a legendary figure in Poland, not least for his literary masterpiece The Manuscript Found in Saragossa. The novel's narrator Alphonse van Worden, a young Walloon officer journeying to join his regiment in Madrid in 1739, is diverted into the Sierra Morena and mysteriously detained in the company of thieves, cannibalists, noblemen and gypsies whose stories he records for us as he hears them, day by day over a period of sixty-six days.

By Jan Potocki Translated by Ian Maclean. Alphonse, a young Walloon officer, is travelling to join his regiment in Madrid in 1739. By Jan Potocki Translated by Ian Maclean. But he soon finds himself mysteriously detained at a highway inn in the strange and varied company of thieves, brigands, cabbalists, noblemen, coquettes and gypsies, whose stories he records over sixty-six days. The resulting manuscript is discovered some forty years later in a sealed casket, from which tales of characters transformed through disguise, magic and illusion, of honour and cowardice, of hauntings and seductions, leap forth to create a vibrant polyphony of human voices.

Written between 1797 and 1815, this book purports to be the discovery of a French army officer captured in Saragossa in 1809. It tells of a soldier hunted by the Inquisition in the 18th century in a band of fugitives including a demoniac, a cabalist, a bandit, a mathematician and a gypsy. Written between 1797 and 1815, this book purports to be the discovery of a French army officer captured in Saragossa in 1809.

A literary masterpiece by a Polish traveller, aristocratic adventurer, political activist, ethnographer and publisherAlphonse, a young Walloon officer, is travelling to join his regiment in Madrid in 1739. But he soon finds himself mysteriously detained at a highway inn in the strange and varied company of thieves, brigands, cabbalists, noblemen, coquettes and gypsies, whose stories he records over sixty-six days. The resulting manuscript is discovered some forty years later in a sealed casket, from which tales of characters transformed through disguise, magic and illusion, of honour and cowardice, of hauntings and seductions, leap forth to create a vibrant polyphony of human voices. Jan Potocki (1761-1812) used a range of literary styles - gothic, picaresque, adventure, pastoral, erotica - in his novel of stories-within-stories, which, like the Decameron and Tales from the Thousand and One Nights, provides entertainment on an epic scale.For more than seventy years, Penguin has been the leading publisher of classic literature in the English-speaking world. With more than 1,700 titles, Penguin Classics represents a global bookshelf of the best works throughout history and across genres and disciplines. Readers trust the series to provide authoritative texts enhanced by introductions and notes by distinguished scholars and contemporary authors, as well as up-to-date translations by award-winning translators.

Comments: (7)

Todal
I read a review of this book years ago in the New York Review of Books. I was so intrigued by the favorable review that I bought the book. It starts out great with an interesting Don Quixote-like character, who is on a journey. As he meets other characters, they tell him stories, and the book quickly becomes a frame story: a story told within a story. But then characters within the interior frame story begin telling stories and by page 150 you are reading a story told by a character who is a character in another story being told by another character within another story within another story. Meanwhile, between these stories and sometimes even in the middle of them, the action retreats back to one of the other characters in one of the other stories. I can't recall specifically, but I think five levels deep into this obsessively framed story before I finally gave up. I tried couple years later to read it again, but I got buried again. Still, I gave it one more try, same result. I am a tenacious reader (have read Under the Volcano and Naked Lunch each a couple times through) yet this book defeated me. Still, I like it. It also has an interesting history, supposedly a "found" manuscript, but that may be an apocryphal claim by the writer or publisher to make it more mysterious. I may give it a fourth try in my retirement.
Zadora
This book takes time to grow on one. After the first two hundred pages, the reader may well ask himself, as I did, whether the gain's really worth the candle in following these seemingly bizarre, unconnected tales. It is. The stories don't seem all that bizarre at all as one reaches the end, simply because of the fact that if you keep a sympathetic ear open toward the various tales, tellers of tales and characters within the tales, you will come to sympathise with each one. And herein lies the significance of this book: It is a mirror in which the reader may view all these disparate aspects of what s/he calls "self".

The reader will, by turns, find himself sympathising with Jews, Christians, Muslims, Chaldeans, pagans of various sorts, absent-minded mathematicians, mystic adepts of the cabbala and on and on. These, very contradictory, ways of perceiving the world eventually come to strike chords in the reader through his or her sympathy with the tale or the teller. Perhaps the primary reason for this looking glass effect is the eroticism never very far from the surface in almost every tale, an eroticism to which every reader, every human being, can relate.

Having finished this lovely, meandering book, I am left pondering, as after finishing every great work of literature, the nature of self and the power of words. As the cabbalist puts it early on in the going here:

"Words strike the air and mind, they act on the senses and on the soul. Although you are not initiates, you can easily grasp that they are the true intermediaries between matter and every order of intelligence." P.102

This book, as do all works of literature, does indeed act as a "true intermediary" between our changing sense of self and the changing world we inhabit.
Whitehammer
The book is a collection of intertwining, often hilarious, stories of various natures, styles, and character: gothic, romance, a singular mathmatician, erotica, chivalry, adventure, greed, religion from many perspectives. It seems that this novel deserves to be more popular, it fits the modern attention span with its substratum of vignettes, and the larger grand story that encompasses them, a timeless tale. The book is funny and the message profound, but of the bewildering conundrum sort that some great poems often leave one with, as the story intertwines the symbols of various lives into something that was mature and introspective but uplifting and cathartic -- it doesn't rely on words but on situations to do this; so probably losses little in translation as many poems do. If anything it leaves one with stronger sense of brotherhood and love for one's neighbor. Definitely fits with modern multiculturalism, or what it should be anyway, and I guess the author was also a Freemason; a strange bag of humanism. I will never forget some of the images, Potocki had quite an imagination.

There are also a lot of parallels with Parzival (the Grail Story) of the farcical sort. The man who can neither stand, nor sit, nor lie (A symbolic castrated Christian in the Grail); the apostasy of one's religion for the sake of a beautiful girl(s) (in Parzival the Muslim gives up his religion without a second thought); mindful, mocking anchorites (in the Grail he scolds Parzival for blowing his chance); the lone search verse the social search.

How does one end a book like this? I think the question is was it really meant to end?

I recommend reading this perhaps first, as Manuscript parradies it a bit: Parzival (Penguin Classics)
Second Read 2017-
On the second read I saw a lot of parallels to Cabalism - well it is directly a significant part of the book. The number 66 is significant to cabalism - the number of chapters in the book. Cabalism does more to cure the possessed man than the Catholic Hermit. Although Rebecca ends up giving up her Cabalistic studies and gets more interested in the mathematician, who possibly represents rationalism - although the author seems to say that a study of rationalism leads to a sort of insanity in itself - if not a lucky one and more morally pure by accident. Cabalism sees Christianity and Islam as misguided Cabalism anyway; but both lack the purity and meaning of the originator - which is Cabalism. Another interesting theme in the book is the loss of the oral tradition and the the loss of people socialising more together possibly due to the effect of books on society. Just like Ray Bradbury's "Fahrenheit 451" warns of the negative effects of screens/tv/and technology on social life Potocki may be, if not warning, lamenting the loss of social interaction due to all the reading and ink all over our lives, given the book was written about 200 years ago at the height of the novel. With Jerry Garcia, Pushkin, and Salman Rushdie all endorsing the book you can't go wrong in saying this book is going to be interesting and hit on many levels. It may be interesting to look further at the connection with cabalism and numbers represented in the book, or maybe not. Doesn't matter, the book is a good read without going deep into it. Have fun!
Nightscar
I have been using the Kindle edition of this book to do the research for my blog,"Looking for the Manuscript Found in Saragossa," about Polish Count Jan Potocki and his spectacularly strange novel. The Kindle edition is totally solid, and being able to search on specific terms to find my way to certain stories in the 650+ page text has been essential. I especially appreciate the active links in the table of contents and in the "A Guide to the Stories" section in the front matter, which makes it so easy to jump to favorite parts (like the funny bits about Velasquez the Geometer). Now if only I could find a Potocki biography written in English ....
The Manuscript Found in Saragossa download epub
History & Criticism
Author: Ian Maclean,Jan Potocki
ISBN: 0140445803
Category: Literature & Fiction
Subcategory: History & Criticism
Language: English
Publisher: Penguin Classics; Reprint edition (September 1, 1996)
Pages: 656 pages