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Dracula: Sense and Nonsense (Desert Island Dracula Library) download epub

by Elizabeth Miller


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Dracula: Sense and Nonsense" is organized into 6 chapters, each of which addresses a. .

Dracula: Sense and Nonsense" is organized into 6 chapters, each of which addresses a different topic of misinformation: "The Sources for Dracula", "Stoker and the Writing of Dracula", "The Novel", "The Geography of Dracula", and "Vlad the Impaler". Miller feels a particular need to dispel the popular idea that Stoker's Count Dracula character was based on the 15th century Wallachian Prince Vlad "Dracula" Tepes.

series Desert Island Dracula Library. This book will tell you, as literary sleuth Elizabeth Miller challenges dozens of popular misconceptions, distortions and fabrications about Bram Stoker and his famous novel.

Elizabeth Miller, Dracula: Sense & Nonsense. Dracula – Sense & Nonsense, 2nd ed. Westcliff-on-Sea, UK: Desert Island Books, 2006, pp. 25–27). 2nd ed. Westcliff-on-Sea, UK: Desert Island Books, 2006, p. 141. ^ Major . Johnson, On the Track of the Crescent: Erratic Notes from the Piraeus to Pesth. London: Hurst and Blackett, 1885. Holte, James Craig (1997). Dracula Film Adaptations.

Dracula": Sense and Nonsense (Desert Island Dracula Library)

Dracula": Sense and Nonsense (Desert Island Dracula Library). 190532815X (ISBN13: 9781905328154). Vlad the Impaler, Castle Dracula - numerous falsehoods fall under her axe. An insightful and delightful read.

Dracula: Sense & Nonsense - eBook . Literary sleuth Elizabeth Miller exposes these and numerous other popular distortions and fabrications that have plagued our understanding of Stoker and his famous novel.

Dracula: Sense and Nonsense (Desert Island Dracula Library). by Elizabeth Russell Miller. Transylvanian mystique and legendary hauntedness surround the most infamous of Bram Stoker's protagonists, forming a legacy that allows the myth to continue into modern times, maintaining a cultish following, yet broadening to a general fascination.

From historical fiction to gritty contemproary novels, these books go beyond stereotypes. 26 Exceptional Nonfiction Books for Kids.

Find out information about The Desert Island Dracula Library. Its last major Dracula publication was Elizabeth Miller’s Dracula Sense and Nonsense in 2000. Explanation of The Desert Island Dracula Library. Volumes of the Desert Island Dracula Library are distributed in North America by Firebird Distributing (1945 P Street, Eureka, CA 95501). Want to thank TFD for its existence?

2006 – Elizabeth Miller, Dracula: Sense and Nonsense (Desert Island Dracula Library), January, 2006. refutes McNally’s thesis that Bram Stoker’s Dracula novel was influenced by the Bathory story.

2006 – Elizabeth Miller, Dracula: Sense and Nonsense (Desert Island Dracula Library), January, 2006. based on extensive study of documents not before examined, or never thoroughly studied.

Retrieved 29 November 2015. 19. a b Dacre Stoker; Ian Holt (13 October 2009). Westcliff-on-Sea, UK: Desert Island Books, 1998, p. 13. ^ Elizabeth Miller, Dracula: Sense & Nonsense.

Transylvanian mystique and legendary hauntedness surround the most infamous of Bram Stoker's protagonists, forming a legacy that allows the myth to continue into modern times, maintaining a cultish following, yet broadening to a general fascination. Intrigued by evil and gore, Stoker developed a literary presence that effortlessly translated to screen by the likes of Murnau, Bela Lugosi, Christopher Lee, and Francis Ford Coppola. Dracula became such an obsession as it embodied a taboo subject matter: the desire for blood and sex. Filled with extraordinary pictures of the Count, his literary companions, and the movie idols, this is a treasure only to be read by daylight!

Comments: (6)

Reggy
Proof that Vlad the Impaler (Dracula) did not inspire the novel Dracula. Interesting reading.
Rainshaper
Sounds like Vlad Tepes talking in the third person about himself. What an ignorant dissection of the Count. He recounts his or rather Tepes deeds against invaders. This book is nonsense and deserves to be dragged into the light where its inanities can dissolve.

"We Szekelys have a right to be proud, for in our veins flows the blood of many brave races who fought as the lion fights, for lordship. Here, in the whirlpool of European races, the Ugric tribe bore down from Iceland the fighting spirit which Thor and Wodin game them, which their Berserkers displayed to such fell intent on the seaboards of Europe, aye, and of Asia and Africa too, till the peoples thought that the werewolves themselves had come. Here, too, when they came, they found the Huns, whose warlike fury had swept the earth like a living flame, till the dying peoples held that in their veins ran the blood of those old witches, who, expelled from Scythia had mated with the devils in the desert. Fools, fools! What devil or what witch was ever so great as Attila, whose blood is in these veins?" He held up his arms. "Is it a wonder that we were a conquering race, that we were proud, that when the Magyar, the Lombard, the Avar, the Bulgar, or the Turk poured his thousands on our frontiers, we drove them back? Is it strange that when Arpad and his legions swept through the Hungarian fatherland he found us here when he reached the frontier, that the Honfoglalas was completed there? And when the Hungarian flood swept eastward, the Szekelys were claimed as kindred by the victorious Magyars, and to us for centuries was trusted the guarding of the frontier of Turkeyland. Aye, and more than that, endless duty of the frontier guard, for as the Turks say, `water sleeps, and the enemy is sleepless.' Who more gladly than we throughout the Four Nations received the `bloody sword,' or at its warlike call flocked quicker to the standard of the King? When was redeemed that great shame of my nation, the shame of Cassova, when the flags of the Wallach and the Magyar went down beneath the Crescent? Who was it but one of my own race who as Voivode crossed the Danube and beat the Turk on his own ground? This was a Dracula indeed!

Woe was it that his own unworthy brother, when he had fallen, sold his people to the Turk and brought the shame of slavery on them! Was it not this Dracula, indeed, who inspired that other of his race who in a later age again and again brought his forces over the great river into Turkeyland, who, when he was beaten back, came again, and again, though he had to come alone from the bloody field where his troops were being slaughtered, since he knew that he alone could ultimately triumph! They said that he thought only of himself. Bah! What good are peasants without a leader? Where ends the war without a brain and heart to conduct it? Again, when, after the battle of Mohacs, we threw off the Hungarian yoke, we of the Dracula blood were amongst their leaders, for our spirit would not brook that we were not free. Ah, young sir, the Szekelys, and the Dracula as their heart's blood, their brains, and their swords, can boast a record that mushroom growths like the Hapsburgs and the Romanoffs can never reach. The warlike days are over. Blood is too precious a thing in these days of dishonourable peace, and the glories of the great races are as a tale that is told."
Awene
For fans and scholars of Bram Stoker's "Dracula" who don't know what to make of the abundance of contradictory and possibly fanciful information about Stoker and his novel that is floating around, Elizabeth Miller offers a solution. "Dracula: Sense and Nonsense" attempts to address, piece by piece, the pervasive unreliable information about "Dracula" that has been passing as fact for the past few decades.

Miller doesn't challenge interpretations of the novel in this book, only outright errors and unsubstantiated propositions. Each piece of "information" that Miller has identified as a misconception is quoted, then followed by an explanation of the error and the facts of the matter, when they are verifiable. Much of the misinformation about "Dracula"'s origins can be cleared up by referring to Stoker's Working Notes for the novel, housed in the Rosenbach Museum & Library's collection in Philadelphia. Miller makes extensive use of the Notes and has also done impressive detective work tracking down sources of misconceptions. "Sense and Nonsense" addresses misinformation and unsupported supposition from a variety of scholarly and popular books on "Dracula", as well as the occasional documentary film.

"Dracula: Sense and Nonsense" is organized into 6 chapters, each of which addresses a different topic of misinformation: "The Sources for Dracula", "Stoker and the Writing of Dracula", "The Novel", "The Geography of Dracula", and "Vlad the Impaler". Miller feels a particular need to dispel the popular idea that Stoker's Count Dracula character was based on the 15th century Wallachian Prince Vlad "Dracula" Tepes. The last chapter is a "Source Alert", in which Miller critiques a number of works of "Dracula" scholarship -annotated editions, bibliographies, biographies, and miscellaneous studies- in terms of their accuracy and value to researchers.

"Dracula: Sense and Nonsense" is readable, interesting, and probably essential to obsessed "Dracula" fans. It's great to get the facts and to know their sources, which Miller documents meticulously. You may agree or disagree with some of the suppositions that have been made about the novel, but at least now you will know where they came from. Considering the ever-increasing popularity of all things Dracula in the popular press and academia, and all of the hype that comes with it, this book is indispensable.
Dracula: Sense and Nonsense (Desert Island Dracula Library) download epub
History & Criticism
Author: Elizabeth Miller
ISBN: 190532815X
Category: Literature & Fiction
Subcategory: History & Criticism
Language: English
Publisher: Desert Island Books; 2Rev Ed edition (January 2006)
Pages: 208 pages