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by Peter Blair


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Peter Blair’s most popular book is The Divine Salt: Poems. Last Heat by. Peter Blair.

Select Format: Paperback. ISBN13:9780915380442.

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Peter Hunter Blair (1912–September 1982) was an English academic and historian specializing in the Anglo-Saxon period. In 1969 he married the children's author, Pauline Clarke. Hunter Blair was a fellow of Emmanuel College, Cambridge and Reader in the Department of Anglo-Saxon, Norse and Celtic, University of Cambridge. His published works include: A History of England. Works by or about Peter Hunter Blair in libraries (WorldCat catalog).

ISBN 9780915380442 (978-15380-44-2) Softcover, The Word Works, 2000

ISBN 9780915380442 (978-15380-44-2) Softcover, The Word Works, 2000. Find signed collectible books: 'Last Heat'. Founded in 1997, BookFinder. Learn More at LibraryThing. Peter Blair at LibraryThing.

The dates are drying' Profits shrivel for farmers as the heat rises in Tunisia. Irrigation systems and oases in the arid south are failing to keep up with the demands of thirsty palm plantations. Profits shrivel for farmers as the heat rises in Tunisia. in Sussex How an English church copied the world’s most famous ceiling. Deacon Gary Bevans talks us through his astonishing, hand-painted creation.

Lecturer, Writing Program. Last Heat (full-length poetry book), Word Works Press, 1999. Furnace Greens (poetry chapbook), Defined Providence Press, 1998. A Round, Fair Distance from the Furnace, (poetry chapbook), White Eagle Coffee Store Press, 1993.

According to Peter Blair Henry, dean of New York University's Stern School of Business and author of the new book Turnaround: Third . While Western nations have been mired in slow economic growth over the last few years, third world economies have flourished.

According to Peter Blair Henry, dean of New York University's Stern School of Business and author of the new book Turnaround: Third World Lessons for First World Growth, there. According to Peter Blair Henry, dean of New York University's Stern School of Business and author of the new book Turnaround: Third World Lessons for First World Growth, there's a lot the West can learn from emerging markets and their governments.

Peter Blair Henry, an economist, was the ninth Dean of New York University's Leonard N. Stern School of Business, and William R. Berkley Professor of Economics and Business. Berkley Professor of Economics and Business, and author of TURNAROUND: Third World Lessons for First World Growth (Basic Books, March 2013). Previously, he was the Konosuke Matsushita Professor of International Economics at Stanford University. Born in Kingston, Jamaica in 1969, Peter Blair Henry became a US citizen in 1986.

In this collection of poems, Peter Blair writes his poems from the point of view of a man who has worked in Pittsburgh's steel mills. He poetically captures the essence of their decline. he laments the blue-collar towns that died as the mills closed down.

Comments: (2)

Quashant
As a former resident of Pittsburgh -- the setting for the poems in this collection -- I found Last Heat by Peter Blair to be somewhat of a "you can go home again" collection for me. Blair writes from the honest and provoking point of view of a man who has worked in Pittsburgh's steel mills, seen their decline, and who has been personally affected by the blue-collar towns that died as the mills closed down.
Last Heat was the winner of the 1999 Word Works Washington Prize, an annual poetry book competition that awards $1,500 and publication to a living poet. And it's easy to see why Blair's book was selected for publication.
Blair's poems are sensitive and emotional an engaging contrast to the furnaces and mill-hunks that pepper his poems. For example, Blair captures the all-too-human side of a co-worker, nicknamed Smoke, in these lines from the poem "Smoke":
His words drift down
from somewhere a tap explosion has scattered them
years ago. His chest heaves slowly,
an old furnace, a molten story. How many blacks
do you see on the river, even today?
I was their sport, see? That was the Forties.
All I remember is fighting. When the foreman calls us
for the next cast, the light in his eyes
vanishes, nothing there now but gray smoke.
Many of Blair's poems capture the intricate bonds between foremen and crew, between co-workers, juxtaposed with poems showing bonds between fathers and sons and brothers. These are true "manly-men", putting up brave fronts, hiding any emotion. But while Blair depicts the outer fronts of his co-workers, you hear his own voice telling you what is inside his head, the emotions he feels seem to speak for the men who won't speak the emotions themselves. One fine example of this is "What It Takes":
But tonight in Pittsburgh,
this old man hobbles on the bridge
toward the rusted streetcar cab
nailed to the outside wall of Chiodo's Bar
like a steel mask
The day has forgotten Graz,
old Pittsburgh, and Big Steel,
but night might remember,
so I lean over the bridge rail
above the silent Slab and Palte Division
and ask my brother's face:
Do I have what it takes?
Blair's words are quite close to being love poems to an era that will never return to Pittsburgh the steel era. His fond recollections of the furnaces and coal cars, the smokestacks and rivers, show a melancholy for a time that was rough, but important to not only his own history, but the history of the families of the "thousands of men and women who worked at Homestead Steel" that he acknowledges at the front of his book.
In the poem "What Love Is", Blair gives us a glimpse of his own family's struggle in a blue-collar town:
Across the kitchen table, we fight again.
I shout, It's MY future, leave the steak
my father grilled for me. Stomping up the steps,
I think of the veins bulging on his forehead,
the white collar he so desired tight around his neck.
When you think of steel mills, you think of machinery, heat, boiling metal, foul smells, etc. But Blair's descriptions of the intricate workings of the mill, down to its steaming slag pits (a trivial hell, one of many / up and down the river.) are so moving, so evocative. If you've ever thought a blue-collar worker could not also be a poet, Peter Blair will convince you otherwise.
...
shustrik
LAST HEAT by Peter Blair is one of the best poetry collections of the year. Blair tells us subtly everything a man needs to know about being a man through an unrelenting yet rapturous gaze into the furnace of the steel mill. We see metaphors made of footlockers, of chipped ham on rye in sandwich machines, and of all the everyday details of blue collar existence.
Not since Carl Sandburg has an American poet managed to ennoble the daily existence of the laborer with the seeming effortlessness of these liquid verses.
Last Heat download epub
History & Criticism
Author: Peter Blair
ISBN: 0915380447
Category: Literature & Fiction
Subcategory: History & Criticism
Language: English
Publisher: The Word Works; 1st edition (March 31, 2000)
Pages: 80 pages