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Color Monitors: The Black Face of Technology in America download epub

by Martin Kevorkian


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Color Monitors provides a much-needed survey of racialized representations vis-à-vis technology in contemporary mainstream American culture.

Color Monitors provides a much-needed survey of racialized representations vis-à-vis technology in contemporary mainstream American culture. Martin Kevorkian navigates among film, advertisements, and narrative fiction in a writing style that is eminently readable without eschewing complexity. Alexander Weheliye, Northwestern University). Martin Kevorkian argues, with wit and variety, that technology has become a preferred cultural tactic for containing blackness

Color Monitors looks at a particular subset of imagined computer use, focusing on scenarios that demand from the .

Color Monitors looks at a particular subset of imagined computer use, focusing on scenarios that demand from the person at the keyboard an intimate technical knowledge. Martin Kevorkian shows how African Americans are consistently depicted as highly skilled, intelligent, and technologically savvy as they work to solve complex computer problems in popular movies, corporate advertising, and contemporary fiction. But is this progress? Or do such seemingly positive depictions have more disturbing implications?

Kevorkian, Martin, 1968-.

Kevorkian, Martin, 1968-. African Americans in mass media, African Americans in popular culture, Computers - Social aspects - United States, Technology - Social aspects - United States. Ithaca, NY : Cornell University Press. Computers with color monitors - Lost worlds - Integrated circuits - Techno-black like me - Thinking inside the black box. Bookplateleaf. Sony Alpha-A6300 (Control). Books for People with Print Disabilities. Cornell University Press.

Color Monitors: The Black Face of Technology in America

Color Monitors: The Black Face of Technology in America.

Published by: Cornell University Press. In some cases, this representation actually corresponds to the assignment of the least desirable forms of computer labor to various subaltern marked bodies.

Martin KevorkianFollowing up on Ralph Ellison's intimation that blacks serve as "the machines inside the machine," Color Monitors examines the designation of black bodies as natural machines for the information age. See details. See all 2 brand new listings. Color Monitors: The Black Face of Technology in America by Martin Kevorkian (Paperback, 2006). Brand new: lowest price.

Martin Kevorkian, Color Monitors: The Black Face of Technology in America. Abdul Alkalimat, "Martin Kevorkian, Color Monitors: The Black Face of Technology in America," The Journal of African American History 92, no. 1 (Winter 2007): 146-147. Of all published articles, the following were the most read within the past 12 months. Introduction: Hip Hop in History: Past, Present, and Future.

The Black Face of Technology in America. Published January 12, 2006 by Cornell University Press.

In lieu of an abstract, here is a brief excerpt of the content: Martin Kevorkian's first book examines the prevalent depiction of African Americans a. .For questions or feedback, please reach us at support at scilit.

"Color Monitors looks at a particular subset of imagined computer use, focusing on scenarios that demand from the person at the keyboard an intimate technical knowledge. My research has uncovered a peculiar pattern: race comes into sharp relief when computer use is depicted as difficult labor requiring special expertise. Time and again, in such scenarios, the helpful person of color is there to take the call―to provide technical support, to deal with the machines. In interpreting such images, Color Monitors analyzes the computer-fearing strain in American whiteness, an aspect of white identity that defines itself against information technology and the racial other imagined to love it and excel at it."―Martin KevorkianFollowing up on Ralph Ellison's intimation that blacks serve as "the machines inside the machine," Color Monitors examines the designation of black bodies as natural machines for the information age. Martin Kevorkian shows how African Americans are consistently depicted as highly skilled, intelligent, and technologically savvy as they work to solve complex computer problems in popular movies, corporate advertising, and contemporary fiction. But is this progress? Or do such seemingly positive depictions have more disturbing implications? Kevorkian provocatively asserts that whites' historical "fear of a black planet" has in the age of microprocessing converged with a new fear of computers and the possibility that digital imperatives will engulf human creativity.Analyzing escapist fantasies from Mission: Impossible to Minority Report, Kevorkian argues that the placement of a black man in front of a computer screen doubly reassures audiences: he is nonthreatening, safely occupied―even imprisoned―by the very machine he attempts to control, an occupation that simultaneously frees the action heroes from any electronic headaches. The study concludes with some alternatives to this scheme, looking to a network of recent authors, with shared affinities for Ellison and Pynchon, willing to think inside the black box of technology.Connecting race, technology, and American empire, Color Monitors will attract attention from scholars working in emerging areas of race theory, African American studies, film studies, cultural studies, and technology and communication studies.


Color Monitors: The Black Face of Technology in America download epub
History & Criticism
Author: Martin Kevorkian
ISBN: 0801472784
Category: Literature & Fiction
Subcategory: History & Criticism
Language: English
Publisher: Cornell University Press; 1 edition (January 4, 2006)
Pages: 224 pages