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Fettered Genius: The African American Bardic Poet from Slavery to Civil Rights download epub

by Keith D. Leonard


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In Fettered Genius, Keith D. Leonard identifies how African American poets' use and revision of traditional .

In Fettered Genius, Keith D. Leonard identifies how African American poets' use and revision of traditional poetics constituted an antiracist political agency. In an ambitious survey that moves from slavery to the cultural nationalism of the 1960s, Leonard examines numerous poets, placing each in the context of his or her time to demonstrate the antiracist meaning of their accomplishments.

book by Keith D. Leonard. Mass Market Paperback Paperback Hardcover Mass Market Paperback Paperback Hardcover.

the African American bardic poet from slavery to civil rights. Bid the gifted Negro soar : the origins of the African American bardic tradition. Writ on glory's scroll : Paul Laurence Dunbar's moral heroism

the African American bardic poet from slavery to civil rights. Published 2006 by University of Virginia Press in Charlottesville. Writ on glory's scroll : Paul Laurence Dunbar's moral heroism. To make a poet Black : constructing an ethnic poetics in Harlem Renaissance poetry. Weaponed woman : the modernist heroism of Gwendolyn Brooks's early verse. Our souls' strict meaning : Robert Hayden's spiritual history.

Refereed Publications: Book: Fettered Genius: The African American Bardic Poet . African American Women Poets and the Power of the Word.

Refereed Publications: Book: Fettered Genius: The African American Bardic Poet from Slavery to Civil Rights. Charlottesville: University of Virginia Press, 2006. Encyclopedia essays: New Black Aesthetics: Post Civil-Rights African American Poetry Cambridge Companion to Twenty-First Century American Poetry (forthcoming). Blues Princeton Encyclopedia of Poetry and Poetics. Princeton, NJ: Princeton University Press (2012): 151-152. Cambridge Companion to African American Women's Literature (Cambridge: Cambridge University Press, 2009): 168-186.

Journal of American Studies. Keith D. Leonard, Fettered Genius: The African American Bardic Poet from Slavery to Civil Rights (Charlottesville, VA: University of Virginia Press, 2006. isbn0 3. ANDREW RADFORD (a1).

Keith D. Leonard, Fettered Genius: The African American Bardic Poet from Slavery to Civil Rights . Larry E. Tise, Proslavery: A History of the Defense of Slavery in America, 1701–1840 (Athens: University of Georgia Press, 1987). Leonard, Fettered Genius: The African American Bardic Poet from Slavery to Civil Rights (Charlottesville: University of Virginia Press, 2006). 4. Roxann Wheeler, The Complexion of Race: Categories of Difference in Eighteenth-Century British Culture (Philadelphia: University of Pennsylvania Press, 2000);CrossRefGoogle Scholar.

Leonard, Keith D. 2005. Fettered Genius: The African American Bardic Poet from Slavery to Civil Rights. Charlottesville: University of Virginia Press. Rhetorics of Literacy: The Cultivation of American Dialect Poetry. Columbus: Ohio State University Press. The Black Arts Enterprise and the Production of African American Poetry. Slave Songs and the Birth of African American Poetry.

The campaign for African American rights-usually referred to as the civil . The new slogan-updated from Harlem Renaissance poet Langston Hughes-was Black is beautiful.

The campaign for African American rights-usually referred to as the civil rights movement or the freedom movement-went forward in the 1940s and ’50s in persistent and deliberate steps. In the courts the NAACP successfully attacked restrictive covenants in housing, segregation in interstate transportation, and discrimination in public recreational facilities. Civil rights demonstrators there were attacked by police who used tear gas, whips, and clubs. Thousands of demonstrators were arrested. As a result, however, their cause won national sympathy and support.

Fettered Genius: The African American Bardic Poet from Slavery to Civil Rights. In Fettered for Life, Farrell points out, she "aligns herself with a small minority of post-Civil War suffragists, including Elizabeth Cady Stanton, who saw the dangers for women's progress in emphasizing gender differences. Yet is Fettered for Life, as Farrell argues, truly "subversive"? Equally, though very differently, fettered are Laura's lower-class friends Rhoda and Maggie, forced to turn from piece-work to prostitution to survive the mean streets. Leonard, American University, author of Fettered Genius: The African American Bardic Poet from . Brilliantly appropriate, this important book has started a conversation that we must have, and it will anchor that conversation for some time. Leonard, American University, author of Fettered Genius: The African American Bardic Poet from Slavery to Civil Rights). ―Keith D. Leonard, American University, author of Fettered Genius: The African American Bardic Poet from Slavery to Civil Rights. Anthony Reed is an associate professor of English and African American Studies at Yale University.

In Fettered Genius, Keith D. Leonard identifies how African American poets’ use and revision of traditional poetics constituted an antiracist political agency. Comparing this practice to the use of poetic mastery by the ancient Celtic bards to resist British imperialism, Leonard shows how traditional poetics enable African American poets to insert racial experience, racial protest, and African American culture into public discourse by making them features of validated artistic expression. As with the Celtic bards, these poets’ artistry testified to their marginalized people’s capacity for imagination and reason within and against the terms of the dominant culture.

In an ambitious survey that moves from slavery to the cultural nationalism of the 1960s, Leonard examines numerous poets, placing each in the context of his or her time to demonstrate the antiracist meaning of their accomplishments. The book offers new insight on the conservatism of Phillis Wheatley, Paul Laurence Dunbar, and the genteel members of the Harlem Renaissance, how their rage for assimilation functioned to refute racist notions of difference and, paradoxically, to affirm a distinctive racial experience as valid material for poetry. Leonard also demonstrates how the more progressive and ethnically distinctive poetics of Langston Hughes, Sterling Brown, Gwendolyn Brooks, Robert Hayden, and Melvin B. Tolson share some of the same ambivalence about cultural achievement as those of the earlier poets. They also have in common the self-conscious pursuit of an affirmation of the African American self through the substitution of African American vernacular language and cultural forms for traditional poetic themes and forms. The evolution of these poetics parallels the emergence of notions of ethnic identity over racial identity and, indeed, in some ways even motivated this shift.

Leonard recognizes poetic mastery as the African American bardic poet’s most powerful claim of ethnic tradition and of social belonging and clarifies the full hybrid complexity of African American identity that makes possible this political self-assertion. The development that is traced in Fettered Genius illustrates nothing less than the defining artistic coherence and political significance of the African American poetic tradition.


Fettered Genius: The African American Bardic Poet from Slavery to Civil Rights download epub
History & Criticism
Author: Keith D. Leonard
ISBN: 0813925053
Category: Literature & Fiction
Subcategory: History & Criticism
Language: English
Publisher: University of Virginia Press (December 29, 2005)
Pages: 256 pages