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The Time of Their Lives: The Golden Age of Great American Book Publishers, Their Editors and Authors download epub

by Dana Benningfield,Al Silverman


Epub Book: 1456 kb. | Fb2 Book: 1578 kb.

The golden age of book publishing, Al Silverman informs us with utter certainty, began in 1946 and lasted into the late 1970s and early 1980s. In his intimate history of those years.

The golden age of book publishing, Al Silverman informs us with utter certainty, began in 1946 and lasted into the late 1970s and early 1980s.

There are great books in non-fiction still published. This is an interesting book written by someone who was an insider during the golden age of American publishing (1946-1984). 4 people found this helpful. Published 3 months ago. gordon saks.

The Time of Their Lives is not only a love song to the industry's golden age, an era that began'after World War . In this fascinating and elegiac history, Al Silverman illuminates a period in publishing that not only was good but also formed a distinguishing landmark of culture in American life.

The Time of Their Lives is not only a love song to the industry's golden age, an era that began'after World War II'and lasted for three-plus decades, but it is also a reflection of the tastes and cultural appetites of the American public. Contact me: inforeq17l.

The publishers seemed to have outlived their authors. Perhaps it was because they knew when to quit. Writers never do, or can’t afford to.

Once again, there I was, scribbling away, unaware that anything special was going on. I’d had a long and bitter struggle in my 20s, during which I’d tried to get the hang of writing a novel. The publishers seemed to have outlived their authors.

According to Al Silverman, former publisher of Viking Press and president of the Book-of-the-Month Club, the golden age of book publishing began after World War II and lasted into the early 1980s

According to Al Silverman, former publisher of Viking Press and president of the Book-of-the-Month Club, the golden age of book publishing began after World War II and lasted into the early 1980s.

The golden age of book publishing, Al Silverman informs us with utter certainty, began in 1946 and lasted into the late 1970s and early 1980s

The golden age of book publishing, Al Silverman informs us with utter certainty, began in 1946 and lasted into the late 1970s and early 1980s. In his intimate history of those years, Silverman sets out to prove this sweeping conceit by relying on the eyes and ears and memories of the men and women who were there creating that history. Without inhibition, more than 120 of. The golden age of book publishing, Al Silverman informs us with utter certainty, began in 1946 and lasted into the late 1970s and early 1980s.

In this love song to book publishing, Silverman offers a fascinating chronicle of the industry's golden age, an era that began . Silverman illuminates a period in publishing that formed a distinguishing landmark of culture in American life.

In this love song to book publishing, Silverman offers a fascinating chronicle of the industry's golden age, an era that began after World War II and lasted for over three decades. Relying on the eyes, ears, and memories of more than 120 notable publishing figures, including Alfred Knopf, the Doubleday fathers and sons, and the Thornhills of Little, Brown and Company, the author offers an intimate history of never-before-told stories about how some of the most important books in postwar America came into being.

Al Silverman (1926–2019) was the author of ten books, including The Time of Their Lives, My Life Is Baseball .

Al Silverman (1926–2019) was the author of ten books, including The Time of Their Lives, My Life Is Baseball (cowritten with Frank Robinson), and I Am Third (cowritten with Gale Sayers), which was adapted into the acclaimed television movie Brian’s Song. He lived with his wife, Rosa, in New York City.

Will Tattercoats find a way to attend the king’s ball if her grandfather refuses to take her? Full color.

Al Silverman, a noted figure in American publishing, has written a wonderful chronicle of book publishing for all who cherish books

Al Silverman, a noted figure in American publishing, has written a wonderful chronicle of book publishing for all who cherish books. The Time of Their Lives is not only a lovesong to the industry’s Golden Age, an era that began after World War II and lastd for three-plus decades, but it is also a reflection of the tastes and cultural appetites of the American public. In his history of mid-century publishing, heads of houses like Alfred Knopf, Bennett Cerf of Random House, Cass Canfield of Harper's, the Dobleday fathers and sons, and the Thornhills of Little, Brown come to the fore.

The golden age of book publishing, Al Silverman informs us with utter certainty, began in 1946 and lasted into the late 1970s and early 1980s. In his intimate history of those years, Silverman sets out to prove this sweeping conceit by relying on the eyes and ears and memories of the men and women who were there creating that history. Without inhibition, more than 120 of the most notable heads of houses, editors and publishers of this time shared many never-before told stories about how the most important books in postwar America came into being, and are still being read today.

In The Time of Their Lives we learn how …

-- Robert Gottlieb worked with Joseph Heller to make Catch-18, as it was then called, into the world renowned Catch-22…

-- Corlies “Cork” Smith took a risk on a shy young man he had neverheard of, Thomas Pynchon, after being absorbed by one of his earliest short stories …

-- Leona Nevler edited under delicate working conditions with a most difficult author, to make Peyton Place a novel for all generations.

It was Arthur Thornhill, Sr., in his years as president of Little, Brown’s grand publishing house who said about the occupation he loved, “I wanted to be part of something that was good,” his word for publishing in the golden age. In this fascinating and elegiac history, Al Silverman illuminates a period in publishing that was not only good, but formed a distinguishing landmark of culture in American life -- a golden time that certainly deserves a new life.


Comments: (7)

Coiriel
I keep picking this up and reading parts of it over. I know some of the people who starred in publishing during this time and have heard about many more of these greats in the business. Whether you know a lot or a little, I think you will enjoy it if you are a writer, a publisher--and certainly, if you are an editor. The stories are great, and highly portable since they can be put down by the chapter as if they were short stories on their own. You have to care about this era AND the companies that put the names of many favorite authors in lights. If you did or do, you will very much enjoy it!
Flower
Anyone who loves books and publishing has to read this chronicle about America's postwar publishers. It is a story of personalities in conflict, both the people who wrote the books and those who brought them to the world. The book is based on interviews. Most of the entries are in the words of the publishers and editors or those who worked with them. A wonderful book, inherently fascinating and important in understanding the way publishing worked at its zenith.
Tujar
The author has had a long and distinguished career in American publishing, including being president of the Book-of-the-Month Club and an editor, and seems to know personally about everybody engaged in American publishing between 1946 and the early 1980's. It is his contention that the post-war period until the early 1980's was at least as much a golden age of publishing as were the 1920's and 1930's with figures such as the legendary Max Perkins. Whether or not one agrees entirely with this assertion, the book does focus upon an extremely fascinating period and group of folks. The author simply went out and interviewed 120 "eyewitnesses" who had been engaged in publishing during this period at a variety of publishers: Knopf, Atheneum, Viking, Doubleday, Harper, and Little Brown to name just a few are discussed in individual chapters. The major paperback houses also are included. Because the author was interviewing his "own", he is just wonderful at filling out his pictures of what publishing was and how it operated during this period with insiders' perspectives. My only problem with the book, which despite its nearly 500 page length moves quickly, is that it is hard to keep all the large cast of characters and companies straight as you pass through the chapters. I also longed for a bit more of an explanation of exactly how editors "edit." His portraits of some key players, such as Alfred A. Knopf, Robert Gottlieb, and George Braziller, add enormously to the richness of the narrative. A small bibliography and some interesting photographs are included, as well as a solid index. A valuable book that is also quite interesting to read.
Nuadazius
Discovered a lot of interesting facts about the publishing business. It took a lot of talent, know how and hard work to survive and stay in the black ink. I love to read just thought it would be interesting to see how it all starts and what's involved from writer to the finished product.
Throw her heart
Anyone interested in the history and operations of the book publishing world from the 40's to the modern era should read this book. Learn how the major houses were built and who lead them, how they brought on their best talent and how some lost them! Their rejections are always more interesting than their bestsellers :)
Der Bat
loved it
Lightwind
This is an interesting book written by someone who was an insider during the golden age of American publishing (1946-1984). Silverman -
impressively - gained access to the living rooms and offices of 120 major figures in the book industry from that era to discuss their life and times. Lots of interesting nuggets such as “Bennet Cerf never took meetings.” And “after graduating summa cum laude from Columbia, Peter Mayer spent five years driving a taxi.” A bit of irony is that in a book written by an editor about editors there are a couple of typos such as one on page 426
It is a memoir of the book publishing industry from the 1940s to the 1980s. It is maybe not fair to book publishers today to call that era the golden age of book publishing ( on American publishing mainly) as there are still great books printed. There is a lot of rubbish books too, but there are good ones like Greg Lawrence's excellent book published in 2011 by St. Martin's Press, New York on Jackie Kennedy Onassis as Book Editor and a little bit on the publishing industry in her time in the mid 1970s to the early 90s when she died. There are quality books printed today like 'Americanah', a new novel this year 2015 by a young African lady on two African people emigrating, finding success and back again to Africa - on the intermingling of cultures based a little on her life experience. It got very good reviews and she is a new quality writer in fiction. There are great books in non-fiction still published. The Time of Their Lives is nice read on the books, authors, book editors and publishers of that time in the 20th century after World War 2.
The Time of Their Lives: The Golden Age of Great American Book Publishers, Their Editors and Authors download epub
History & Criticism
Author: Dana Benningfield,Al Silverman
ISBN: 0312350031
Category: Literature & Fiction
Subcategory: History & Criticism
Language: English
Publisher: Truman Talley Books; First Edition edition (September 16, 2008)
Pages: 512 pages