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The Intellectuals and the Masses: Pride and Prejudices among the Literary Intelligentsia, 1880-1939 download epub

by John Carey


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John Carey's devastating attack on the intellectuals exposes the loathing which the mass of humanity ignited in. .The intellectual and the masses is about what it says on the tin – intellectual elitists and the sheepish masses.

John Carey's devastating attack on the intellectuals exposes the loathing which the mass of humanity ignited in many of the virtual founders of modern culture: . Shaw, Ezra Pound, James Joyce, . Forster, Virginia Woolf, . Professor Carey compares their detestation of common humanity to Nietzsche, whose philosophy helped create the atmosphere leading to the rise of Adolph Hitler.

Intellectuals seem to have the idea that they are not like the rest of us. Their arguments for promoting this idea are analyzed in this book. The works of the intelligentsia are made to speak for themselves and the picture is frequently unpleasant. Generalizations are always problematic and feed into the kinds of false premises and observations Carey exposes in his analysis. The results are potentially as insidious as the programs of the intelligentsia discussed but that potential misuse doesn't detract from the author's opinions.

The Revolt of the Masses. Rewriting the Masses. The Suburbs and the Clerks. Natural Aristocrats - Pt. II. Case Studies. George Gissing and the Ineducable Masses.

John Carey's devastating attack on the intellectuals exposes the loathing which the mass of humanity ignited in.This book, as defined in his preface, "is about the response of the English literary intelligentsia to the new phenomenon of mass culture.

John Carey is an Emeritus Professor at Oxford University. His books include studies of Donne, Dickens and Thackeray, The Intellectuals and the Masses, What Good Are the Arts?and a life of William Golding. Country of Publication.

com: Intellectuals and the Masses - Pride and Prejudice among the Literary Intelligentsia, 1880-1939: H. G. Wells hoped the newly emergent masses would be eliminated by plague and atomic bombs, and D. H. Lawrence visualized a huge lethal chamber in which they could be exterminated. Some of our greatest literary icons loathed and detested the common man. The impact is spine-chilling. John Carey's devastating attack on the intellectuals exposes the loathing which the mass of humanity ignited in many of the virtual founders of modern culture: .

Professor John Carey shows how early twentieth-century intellectuals imagined the 'masses' as semi-human swarms, drugged by popular newspapers and cinema, and ripe for extermination. The Intellectuals & The Masses: Pride & Prejudice Among The Literary Intelligentsia, 1880-1939 by John Carey is an informed and informative analysis of the elitist views of respected and influential literary icons during the late 1800's and early 1900's, including H. Wells, D. Lawrence, G. B. Shaw, Ezra Pound, James Joyce, Virginia Woolf, T. S. Elliot, and others.

John Carey analyses the elitist view of some of the most highly respected literary icons of the late 19th and early 20th centuries. This book, as described in his preface, is about the response of the English literary intelligensia to the new phemen of mass culture

John Carey analyses the elitist view of some of the most highly respected literary icons of the late 19th and early 20th centuries. This book, as described in his preface, is about the response of the English literary intelligensia to the new phemen of mass culture. This devastating attack on the intellectuals exposes the loathing which the mass of humanity ignited in many of the virtual founders of modern culture: Ezra Pound, James Joyce, E M Forster, Virginia Woolf, T S Eliot and others

John Carey's devastating attack on the intellectuals exposes the loathing which the mass of humanity ignited in.

Professor John Carey shows how early twentieth-century intellectuals imagined the ‘masses’ as semi-human .

Professor John Carey shows how early twentieth-century intellectuals imagined the ‘masses’ as semi-human swarms, drugged by popular newspapers and cinema, and ripe for extermination. Exposing the revulsion from common humanity in George Bernard Shaw, Ezra Pound, D. Lawrence, E. M. Forster, Virginia Woolf, H. Wells, Aldous Huxley, W. Yeats and other canonized writers, he relates this to the cult of the Nietzschean Superman, which found its ultimate exponent in Hitler.

Professor John Carey shows how early twentieth-century intellectuals imagined the 'masses' as semi-human swarms, drugged by popular newspapers and cinema, and ripe for extermination. Exposing the revulsion from common humanity in George Bernard Shaw, Ezra Pound, D. H. Lawrence, E. M. Forster, Virginia Woolf, H. G. Wells, Aldous Huxley, W. B. Yeats and other canonized writers, he relates this to the cult of the Nietzschean Superman, which found its ultimate exponent in Hitler. Carey's assault on the founders of modern culture caused consternation throughout the artistic and academic establishments when it was first published in 1992.

Comments: (7)

Innadril
Intellectuals seem to have the idea that they are not like the rest of us. Their arguments for promoting this idea are analyzed in this book. The works of the intelligentsia are made to speak for themselves and the picture is frequently unpleasant.

Generalizations are always problematic and feed into the kinds of false premises and observations Carey exposes in his analysis. The results are potentially as insidious as the programs of the intelligentsia discussed but that potential misuse doesn't detract from the author's opinions. Many artists and intellectuals are dangerously elitist, but so are the prejudices of the classes of people these intellectuals find so distasteful.

This is a refreshing expose of ideas and the people who clung so fiercely to them.

It is irrefutable that many people, thinkers of whatever quality, shared many of the same prejudices as Hitler and other Fascists. Revealing this unpleasant truth does not disqualify Carey's argument or his approach -- as another reviewer argues, saying merely mentioning a polarizing figure like Hitler prejudices the discussion and disqualifies the author because it seems a cheap tactic to demonize the intelligentsia by mentioning their affinities to the ideas of a monster. Carey lets the authors testify through their own writing.

Recommended.
The Apotheoses of Lacspor
This book analyses the appeal of certain literature to different classes or groups of people. It is a novel survey of cultural tastes of the period.
Adoranin
This is an essay a very excellent one on a subject never covered before . I would very highly recommend it.
Fonceiah
I ordered this book because I'd read Professor Carey's excellent books on Thackeray and Dickens, and expected this would be of the same quality. To say I was disappointed is a huge understatement. Carey argues that modernism was a complicit plot by snobbish intellectuals--T.S. Eliot, Wyndham Lewis, all the usual suspects--to exclude "the masses" from reading their works, thereby ignoring all the major factor that led to "The Waste Land" & etc. Pure nonsense!!!
Teonyo
Carey, John. The Intellectuals and the Masses: Pride and Prejudice among the Literary Intelligentsia, 1880-1939

This iconoclastic account of the attitude of intellectuals towards popular writing in the sixty years from 1880 to the Second World War is at times brilliant and at other times unfair. As an opponent of snobbish exclusiveness Carey does a hatchet job on literary idols, such as TS Eliot, Virginia Woolf and HG Wells who all evince a contempt for the ‘masses.’ But while Eliot and Woolf look down on the ordinary man, Wells is in fact from the ordinary working class and his New Republic is obviously fantasy, a Hitlerian vision of a gentrified holocaust in which the weak are eliminated. Carey is unfair to Joyce too, stating that Bloom ‘is expelled from the circle of the intelligentsia.’ He blames Joyce for rigorously excluding people like Bloom from reading an obscure book like Ulysees. I can see Poldy in retirement being fascinated by it. He is intelligent and enquiring enough. In any case, who in the novel belongs in this magic circle? Stephen perhaps?
On the other hand, taking off from Virginia Woolf’s essay on ‘Mr Bennett and Mrs Brown,’ Carey devotes 29 pages, the longest chapter in the book, to celebrating the work of Arnold Bennett, whose ‘novels are still undervalued by literary academics, syllabus-devisers and other official censors.’ Who are these ‘censors’ who go about undervaluing Bennett? Anyway, ‘they’ are enrolled in Carey’s club of intelligentsia who despise any author who is popular and makes money from his writing. In any case is Bennett really that good? Would a young person today get more from Clayhanger than from Mrs Dalloway for example?

The Intellectuals and the Masses is of course not primarily concerned with literary criticism but with the politco-social scene 75 years ago. It begins and ends with discussion of the then growing population problem - now best not thought about. A study of fiction readership today would provide a very different picture. The paperback, the ebook and the exponential rise of the self-publishing industry have liberated the so-called masses from traditional reading habits. There are literally thousands of prizes offered worldwide for innovative cheap fiction. Anyone may write and publish. There’s no room for snobs and prigs in a culture ruled by the merry-go-round of television and the internet.
The Intellectuals and the Masses: Pride and Prejudices among the Literary Intelligentsia, 1880-1939 download epub
History & Criticism
Author: John Carey
ISBN: 0571169260
Category: Literature & Fiction
Subcategory: History & Criticism
Language: English
Publisher: Faber & Faber (October 1, 1992)
Pages: 256 pages