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Allegories of the Purge: How Literature Responded to the Postwar Trials of Writers and Intellectuals in France download epub

by Philip Watts


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This book is about four writers-Sartre, Eluard, Blanchot, and Céline-whose works confront and respond to the purge of collaborationist intellectuals in postwar France.

This book is about four writers-Sartre, Eluard, Blanchot, and Céline-whose works confront and respond to the purge of collaborationist intellectuals in postwar France.

This book is about four writers-Sartre, Eluard, Blanchot, and Céline-whose works confront and respond to the purge of collaborationist intellectuals in postwar. Mass Market Paperback Paperback Hardcover Mass Market Paperback Paperback Hardcover.

Such uniform discounting has been considered extensively through examples in the first five chapters of this book, and in the literature generally

Such uniform discounting has been considered extensively through examples in the first five chapters of this book, and in the literature generally. implicit in uniform discounting is to maximize the expected sum of the first n observations. This complements their northern survey, and our new source list of 56 objects. forms a uniform, all-Plane resource for further studies.

This book is about four writers - Sartre, Eluard, Blanchot, and Celine - whose works confront and respond to the purge of collaborationist intellectuals in postwar France

This book is about four writers - Sartre, Eluard, Blanchot, and Celine - whose works confront and respond to the purge of collaborationist intellectuals in postwar France. Summary, et. In their reactions to the purge, these writers mobilized a number of discourses, ranging from the historical, economic, and literary to the sexual, medical, and corporeal

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Stanford: Stanford University Press, 1998. Authors and Affiliations.

He then continued to study how literature and film participate in democratic formations, publishing articles on Jean Genet, Jacques Ranciere, Roland Barthes and film, Jacques Rivette and the Cold War, and the films of Jean-Marie Straub and Daniele Huillet.

Philip Watts is Associate Professor and Chair of the Department of French and Romance Philology at Columbia University. He is the author of Allegories of the Purge.

Kundera has been living in France since 1975

One of the foremost contemporary Czech writers, Kundera is a novelist, poet, and playwright. His play The Keeper of the Keys, produced in Czechoslovakia in 1962, has long been performed in a dozen countries. Kundera has been living in France since 1975. His books, for a long time suppressed in his native country, are once again published.

This book is about four writers―Sartre, Eluard, Blanchot, and Céline―whose works confront and respond to the purge of collaborationist intellectuals in postwar France. It investigates how their writing argues for or against the different positions outlined during the purge and how it reflects or distorts the competing theories about literature to emerge from the trials.

These writers were themselves involved in the trials to varying degrees: Céline was accused of treason, though eventually condemned on a lesser charge; Eluard, one of the leading Resistance poets and a Communist, published in the clandestine Resistance press and devoted a number of his poems to condemning collaborators; Sartre’s theory of committed literature reiterates the theme of the writer’s responsibility as presented during the trials; as for Blanchot, if his work never directly comments upon the purge, its arguments for the autonomy of literature are both a response to Sartre and a commentary on what Blanchot called the “trial of art.”

In their reactions to the purge, these writers mobilized a number of discourses, ranging from the historical, economic, and literary to the sexual, medical, and corporeal. To understand their views on the trials, it is useful to read their texts as allegories of the purge. At one point or another they all speak about the purge through a series of metaphoric substitutions maintained through an extended narrative―whether this narrative is a critical essay, a novel, or a collection of poems. The texts also give the reader a code for reading them allegorically, and this code is the purge archive, whose records, debates, and arguments reshaped the way writers understood their craft.


Comments: (3)

Gralinda
This remarkable study explores the complex interaction which took place in France, in the immediate aftermath of World War II, between the purge trials and literary theory. As French collaborationist writers were tried for treason and intelligence with the ennemy, prosecutors and defenders debated over the role of literature, and the role of the intellectual, in modern societies. After presenting and explaining the stakes of these debates, Phil Watts analyzes how novelists and poets have echoed (and sometimes anticipated) either side of the arguments in their literary works. Celine, Sartre, Blanchot, Eluard are interpreted in a new and powerful perspective which also offers the reader invaluable insights into the literary and intellectual debates held in France during the 1960s and 1970s, all the way to recent events like the Paul De Man affair.
Should civilized nations kill their poets? Certainly not. Should these poets be above the law for the sake of the autonomy of literature, even after they fed and led the anti-Semitic hysteria? "Allegories of the Purge" raises a whole set of fascinating questions at the crossroads of history, literary theory, politics and ethics, without ever succumbing to the temptation of providing oversimplified answers, but avoiding with equal mastery all the traps of escapism. A brilliant and stimulating book!
Ballazan
Anyone who wants to understand the history of "French theory" would be well advised to start with Philip Watts's important study of French writers and intellectuals (Sartre, Celine, Duras, Blanchot, and Eluard) caught up in the period known as the Purge, when some 350,000 French citizens were judged for acts of collaboration with the Nazi occupier. Sartre calls for a commited, responsible literature, while Celine clings defensively to style over ideas, and so the stage is set for a debate over the role of the writer that is still raging. Watts reminds us that the literary and philosophical classics we read today were born in a period when words could cost you your life. This is a brilliant essay, elegant and probing. I recommend it not only to students of France but to anyone interested in the interplay of politics, literature, and justice.
Gavirgas
A clearly written work on the difficulty of separating art and literature from reality. How far should "art for art's sake" be allowed to go? How far can anyone distance himself from reality? Watts has done an excellent job of analyzing the works of four authors in relation to the reality of the postwar purge, and of dealing with the difficulty of remembering that in this century, in a democratic country, authors could be - and were - executed for their writings. Allegories of the Purge is a very intelligent, well-written work which gives the reader a new and important view of post-war France.
Allegories of the Purge: How Literature Responded to the Postwar Trials of Writers and Intellectuals in France download epub
History & Criticism
Author: Philip Watts
ISBN: 0804731853
Category: Literature & Fiction
Subcategory: History & Criticism
Language: English
Publisher: Stanford University Press; 1 edition (December 1, 1998)
Pages: 234 pages