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Shelby Foote: A Writer's Life download epub

by C. Stuart Chapman


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Shelby Dade Foote Jr. (November 17, 1916 – June 27, 2005) was an American writer and journalist who wrote The Civil War: A Narrative, a three-volume history of the American Civil War. With geographic and cultural roots in the Mississippi Delta, Foote'. With geographic and cultural roots in the Mississippi Delta, Foote's life and writing paralleled the radical shift from the agrarian planter system of the Old South to the Civil Rights era of the New South

Home Browse Books Book details, Shelby Foote: A Writer's Life. Chapman's biography plumbs the ambiguous life of the gentlemanly novelist andhistorian Foote, author of "The Civil War: A Narrative.

Home Browse Books Book details, Shelby Foote: A Writer's Life. Shelby Foote: A Writer's Life. By C. Stuart Chapman.

Chapman discusses his book Shelby Foote: A Writer’s Life, published by University Press of Mississippi

org/defaults/BookTV default-image. jpgIn Greenville, Mississippi, birthplace of Shelby Foote, Mr. Chapman discusses his book Shelby Foote: A Writer’s Life, published by University Press of Mississippi. Shelby Foote is a biographer, novelist, and historian best known for his three-volume chronicle The Civil War: A Narrative. The book talks about Foote’s reluctance to address the issues of the contemporary south while thoroughly exploring the issues and concerns of the historical South

Biography - Literary Criticism For a biographer Shelby Foote is a famously reluctant subject.

Biography - Literary Criticism For a biographer Shelby Foote is a famously reluctant subject. Born into Mississippi Delta gentry in 1916, Foote has engaged in a lifelong struggle with the realities behind his persona, the classic image of the southern gentleman.

Shelby Foote's monumental historical trilogy, "The Civil War: A Narrative," is our window into the day-by-day unfolding of our nation's defining event. Now Foote reveals the deeper human truth behind the battles and speeches through the fiction he has chosen for this vivid, moving collection. These ten stories of the Civil War give us the experience of joining a coachload of whores left on a siding during a battle in Virginia. marching into an old man's house to tell him it's about to be burned down. or seeing a childhood friend shot down at Chickamauga.

Shelby Foote American Story American Civil War A Writer's Life Writers Write Gettysburg Historian Civil Wars . Shelby Foote - American Civil War historian who helped bring things to life in the acclaimed documentary series "The Civil War". Shelby Foote - Find A Grave Memorial.

Shelby Foote American Story American Civil War A Writer's Life Writers Write Gettysburg Historian Civil Wars Book Authors. What others are saying. Shelby Foote (1916 - 2005) American Civil War historian who helped bring things to life in the acclaimed documentary series "The Civil War".

By C. The qualities that graced the three volumes of his ''Civil War: A Narrative'' - vivid storytelling and depth of knowledge and feeling - made him a celebrity and rekindled interest in his work.

For a biographer Shelby Foote is a famously reluctant subject. In writing this biography, however, C. Stuart Chapman gained valuable access through interviews and shared correspondence, an advantage Foote rarely has granted to others.

Born into Mississippi Delta gentry in 1916, Foote has engaged in a lifelong struggle with the realities behind his persona, the classic image of the southern gentleman. His polished civil graces mask a conflict deep within. Foote's beloved South is a changing region, and even progressive change, of which Foote approves, can be unsettling. In letters and interviews, and in his writings, he often waxes nostalgic as he grapples to recover the grace of an earlier time, particularly the era of the Civil War. Indeed, Chapman reveals that the whole of Foote's novels and historical narratives serves as a refuge from deeply ambiguous feelings. As Foote has struggled to understand the radical shifts brought to his native land by modernization and the region's integration into the nation, his personal history has been clouded by ideological conflict.

This biography shows him pining for aristocratic, antebellum culture while rejecting the practices that made possible the injustices of that era. Privately and vehemently, Foote opposed George C. Wallace's and Ross Barnett's untenable segregationist stance. Yet publicly during the 1960s and '70s he skirted the explosive race issue.

Foote is best known for his dazzling and definitive The Civil War: A Narrative. Written from 1954 to 1974, the three-volume opus was published during years when the South exploded with racial and political tensions and was forever changed. This biography recognizes that nowhere are Foote's personal conflicts, ambivalence, and outright contradictions more on display than in his fiction. Although Love in a Dry Season, Jordan County, and September, September are set in the contemporary South, they reach no firm social resolutions. Instead they entertain, dramatize, and come to grips with the social, gender, and racial barriers of the southern life he experienced.

While showing how Foote's guarded embrace of the South's past and present characterizes his identity as a thinker, a historian, and a writer of fiction, Chapman discloses Foote's reluctance to address burning contemporary issues and his veiled desire to recall more gracious times.

C. Stuart Chapman is a Massachusetts State House aide living in Jamaica Plain. His work has been published in the Clarksdale Press-Register, Memphis Business Journal, the Memphis Commercial Appeal, Jamaica Plain Gazette, Modern Fiction Studies, and other publications.


Comments: (7)

lolike
Confession - I have been a Shelby Foote fan since reading his novel "Shiloh". I was first exposed to his "Civil War: A Narrative" trilogy while in college. Volume three came was released fall of my senior year. I have read the first two volumes and am about 125 pages into volume three at this writing.

C. Stuart Chapman has written an enlightening and well-written book that conveys an impartial message. His writing lets you know he is a Foote admirer.

What I like best about the book is it tells a good story. Foote came from Greenville, Mississippi. His family was a wealthy, plantation owning family who had lost their money before his birth. His mother was Jewish - a Rosenstock. His boyhood and lifelong friend was Walker Percy, who later became a celebrated novelist. Percy's influence and friendship cover most of Foote life. Percy Walker died in the late 1980's.

Shelby Foote had his faults. They were clearly pointed out by Chapman. They included his womanizing, dropping out of the University of North Carolina, getting a court martial and booted out of the Army with initially a dishonorable discharge, later commuted to a "other than honorable" discharge. He has two failed marriages. His getting future wife number two pregnant before marriage. It took an intellectual woman who was a classmate of Jackie Kennedy to finally tame Shelby Foote. She abandoned her medical doctor first husband and two children to marry and become Mrs. Shelby Foote number three. He exaggerated the depth of his friendship with the man he idolized, Nobel winner William Faulkner. Percy Walker frequently floated a loan to Foote in the early years which allowed him to keep writing.

I found it interesting that when Foote moved to Memphis he lived in the inner city and did not seem to have issue living in a transitional neighborhood. Foote contempt for academics was interesting. I felt at times he wished he was one, but he knew he lacked the sheepskin credential.

The roll of the Ken Burns series on "The Civil War" to make Foote a national name, providing the fame he longed for, and to make him financially solvent with the record sales of his books after the airing of the PBS mini-series was enlightening. A star was born.

This is a good book, well written, interesting, and won the 2002 Eudora Welty Prize. The author C. Stuart Chapman received his Ph.D. from Boston University, where he studied American literature with an emphasis in Southern literature. He earned an M.A. at the University of Georgia in 1994, where his thesis was "Locating the Other in New Orleans: Southern Post-World War I Cultural Representation in William Faulkner's Absalom, Absalom!, Katherine Anne Porter's Old Mortality, and Tennessee Williams' A Streetcar Named Desire." His doctoral dissertation was a biography of Shelby Foote. His undergraduate work was at Rhodes College in Memphis. Read and reviewed by Jimmie A. Kepler in February 2008.
Yozshubei
I enjoyed this book immensely. It is a fascinating account of Foote's life, both good and bad. One gets the feeling that Foote accomplished so much, yet never achieved what he set it to do - win the national book award. The relationship between Foote and the famous Percy family, including their affect on his writing and career was very interesting. All in all a seemingly accurate portrait of a curiously attractive writer.
Doktilar
What a Southern gentleman Shelby Foote was and I fell in love with him in Ken Burns' Civil War...quite the Southern history and this was a great read on him...thank you.
roternow
Great read!!
sunrise bird
Very good. Helpful information.
Silverbrew
Loved reading about his life after reading
The Civil War and watching the PBS documentary. Recommend to any history buff.
Shalizel
An honest, "the good, the bad and the ugly" about a fascinating man and amazing historian. An interesting read and background to help you understand the man and the impact his life had on us thru "The Civil War" series by Ken Burns.
I have to disagree with the earlier, anonymous reviewer who says this book is drivel. I found it an enlightening and well-written book that delivers a non-partisan message, but it is written by someone who truly admires Shelby Foote. What's wrong with that? Foote is a wonderful historian, even though as many have said his volumes on the Civil War tell the story almost entirely as one of big battles and great men.

Chapman does not let his reverence for Foote's writings get in the way of telling a good story. And what a story! He came from the long-ago vanished South of the aristocrats, and along with his boyhood friend Walker Percy, who later became a celebrated novelist, the two of them tracked the changes in Southern society in their novels and other writings. Foote had his faults too, as Chapman notes ruefully: he exaggerated the depth of his friendship with the man he idolized, Nobel winner William Faulkner, who lived but a hundred miles away; he was a womanizer who just couldn't keep it in his pants; his relationship with his daughter Margaret, who became attached to the Seattle rock guitarist Jimi Hendrix, was troubled to the point that he denied they were related; and his position on race relations wasn't a very activist one. Even his relationship with Percy was strained by the two men's seesawing careers and who was up. who was down, at any given moment. The Ken Burns thing happened at exactly the right time for Shelby Foote, and from now on, people would no longer be confusing him with Horton Foote--no relation.

Chapman's "LIFE" makes me curious to see the publication of "TWO GATES TO THE CITY," the novel on which Shelby Foote again and again dashed his hopes, an unconquerable manuscript that was worth its weight in tears. Maybe someday we will see some version of it. Until then, we have all his other books to read and re-read at leisure.
Shelby Foote: A Writer's Life download epub
History & Criticism
Author: C. Stuart Chapman
ISBN: 1578063590
Category: Literature & Fiction
Subcategory: History & Criticism
Language: English
Publisher: University Press of Mississippi; 1st US - 1st Printing edition (February 13, 2003)
Pages: 317 pages