» » Seven Years

Seven Years download epub

by Peter Stamm


Epub Book: 1450 kb. | Fb2 Book: 1336 kb.

Seven years, Peter Stamm ; translated by Michael Hofmann. I hadn’t seen Antje for almost twenty years, and even so I recognized her right away. She must be about sixty, but her face was still youthful. Well, she said, and kissed me on both cheeks.

Seven years, Peter Stamm ; translated by Michael Hofmann. p. cm. eISBN: 978-1-59051-395-8 1. Married people - Fiction.

Seven Years by Peter Stamm is the most unrelentingly depressing novel I have ever read. This is a novel of ordinary, basically good middle-class people living in Munich who have no passions, no interests, no love, even for their child

Seven Years by Peter Stamm is the most unrelentingly depressing novel I have ever read. This is a novel of ordinary, basically good middle-class people living in Munich who have no passions, no interests, no love, even for their child. There is no violence, only mild sex, no events to remember in this novel.

After a while she said she had thought it couldn’t get any worse. Is it so bad then?, I asked. What do you think? Try and put yourself in her shoes. What do you think? Try and put yourself in her shoes eases, and ends up paying her for it too. She gets pregnant, and hopes they will now start a family together, instead of which he takes her baby away from her, and she’s left with nothing. I said I had recently heard a sentence in a film that made sense to me: you are what you love, not who loves you. I need to think about that, said Antje, and she filled up her glass.

In his recent novel, SEVEN YEARS, Swiss author Peter Stamm explores the complications of intimate human emotions and relationships, seen primarily from the perspective of the man in the middle. While at first glance the story has not much new to offer, Stamm's writing is in unexpected ways catching; his ability to reflect, through the mind of his character Alex, on deeper layers of the human psyche, is meaningful and thought provoking beyond the actual story.

Following the publication of the widely acclaimed novel Seven Years comes a trove of stories from the Swiss master Peter Stamm.

Alex has spent the majority of his adult life between two very different women-and he can't make up his mind. Sonia, his wife and business partner, is everything a man would want. Intelligent, gorgeous, charming, and ambitious, she worked tirelessly alongside him to open their architecture firm and to build a life of luxury. Following the publication of the widely acclaimed novel Seven Years comes a trove of stories from the Swiss master Peter Stamm. They all possess the traits that have built Stamm's reputation: the directness of the prose, the deceptive surface simplicity of the narratives, and deep psychological insight into the existential dilemmas of contemporary life.

Peter Stamm (born January 18, 1963 in Münsterlingen) is a Swiss writer. For his entire body of work and his accomplishments in fiction, he was short-listed for the Man Booker International Prize in 2013, and in 2014 he won the prestigious Friedrich Hölderlin Prize.

Halfway through Peter Stamm's new novel, Seven Years, an extraordinary moment occurs. The narrator, Alex, is remembering being with Sonia, the young woman who had just agreed to marry him. "We stood next to each other in the bathroom and looked at ourselves in the mirror.

Before Peter Stamm emerged as one of Europe’s most exciting writers, he worked, for nearly a decade, as an. .

But although Stamm has left this career behind, the characters in his novels and short stories often act and think like bookkeepers, calculating their experiences in terms of ratios and costs, gains and losses. Ultimately, Alex doesn’t feel at home with any woman - or anyone. While Sonia may be the ideal wife, she is, in a sense, a project.

To read this book, upload an EPUB or FB2 file to Bookmate.

Seven Years - Peter Stamm. I thought the plot was tedious and oppressive, the characters deeply unlikeable, and the prose stylistically barren.

Book by Stamm, Peter

Comments: (7)

Mogelv
It's tempting to summarize the plot of Peter Stamm's Seven Years (as
I began to do when I first sat down to write this review) as a rather
grim exploration of a man's obsessive affair with a woman he finds
dull and unattractive, but who nonetheless provides him with an escape
from the unfulfillment he feels about his successful career and
seemingly "perfect" marriage. And yet the more time I spent thinking
about this novel--which definitely desires, even demands, that readers
do as much--the more I realized that if the protagonist, an architect
named Alex, truly did not love his wife, Sonia, or find any
fulfillment in their life together, then his relationship with his
lover Ivona, and thus the novel's plot, would be far simpler--and far
less compelling. For despite the many complications involved in
changing one's life, for those of us lucky enough to live in
relatively safe and stable times and places, the remedies for many of
the sources of our unhappiness are usually within reach: get a
divorce; find a new career path; take a trip or go back to school or
seek therapeutic help of some kind; maybe finally buy a dog. But part
of the brilliance of Stamm's novel is his subtle exploration of a much
trickier human conundrum: often, we can be fairly fulfilled, even
happy, with our lives and yet still yearn for something more profound,
something more meaningful. Even more confounding, sometimes we truly
can love someone and yet still be inexplicably drawn to something that
we find (or don't find, and continue to seek) in someone else. Thus,
as with Stamm's narrator Alex, the compulsions that can call us toward
the rocks don't necessarily drown out our happiness so much as talk
over and around and through it; they don't replace the existing
conversation so much as add a strange, thrilling new vocabulary of
their own.

To be sure, both Alex's marriage and career are built upon
practicality rather than passion, and he views his life as a "project"
to be calculated like a balance sheet of gains and losses. On the
other hand, Alex's relationship with his lover Ivona, despite the
intense sexual attraction that crops up again and again to possess and
obsess him, is most often characterized by debasement, disgust, and
neglect. At best, he manages indifference or a basic concern for her
welfare, and one can't help but cringe at the mutually sadomasochistic
dynamic that seems to compel and propel these two together. In fact,
there is much to be made uncomfortable by in this novel, and yet it's
an astonishing accomplishment on Stamm's part that despite themselves,
the main characters (and even many of the minor ones) not only drew me
into their hopes and dreams and flaws and failures, but made me care
about them, too--a lot like real life, come to think of it.

When Alex's carefully built life structures eventually come crashing
down one by one, he is left with nothing but the raw material of
himself with which to rebuild. Stamm provides no answers as to how
that rebuilding will occur (or with whom), but I'd like to think that
at the end of the novel, as Alex gazes at the "inexplicably beautiful"
(and notably empty) sky above him, he has finally begun to understand
that galvanizing German concept of Sehnsucht: the intense yearning for
that unnameable, ungraspable something, defined by C.S. Lewis as the
"inconsolable longing" inherent in the human heart for "we know not
what." I would also like to think that Alex can find a way to satisfy
some of his more tangible desires without falling into the trap of
only really wanting the things he doesn't have, until he has them.
Even more important, perhaps beneath that empty sky, he can make peace
with those less tangible "inconsolable" longings that inevitably color
our souls with sadness and heartbreak and loss, but without which
leave a barren, monotonous palette indeed.
ME
Read "Unformed Landscape" because of this. Sentences flow elegantly inviting the reader to want more and more, while disturbing truths come out of this sad story.
ALAN
Fresh, inventive, insightful -- wonderful prose; untriguing plot and well-portrayed characters picture love, lack of it, angst, and humor, and show us where to look to find comfort and acceptance.
I'm a Russian Occupant
i am a late night reader most of the time and i didn't want to give it up and go to bed.i turned the light out and turned it back on to read some more
Shou
I liked this novel, first one read by Stamm. His characters are well developed and with depth and the plot can certainly be real. I recommend it without reservations.
Coiron
Just a very good book. Different from what one normally sees.
Androlhala
Uninteresting characters, depressing plot (what there was of it) unsatisfactory ending....no more Peter Stamm for me! I do NOT recommend it.
Seven Years by Peter Stamm is the most unrelentingly depressing novel I have ever read.

This is a novel of ordinary, basically good middle-class people living in Munich who have no passions, no interests, no love, even for their child. There is no violence, only mild sex, no events to remember in this novel. It is a portrait of bland, unhappy, almost affectless modern life. The novel is written in a style that suits its content—simple, clear, bland, no humor, no passion. The story is told in the first person—basically it is the somewhat disconnected autobiography of a mostly unsuccessful architect; his student days and lack of real interest in architecture, his unloving love affairs, his bland marriage, his rocky career in business, etc. etc. etc.

Nevertheless, I must say, that I was absorbed by this book. I cared about the main character. I got quite involved in the life and thought the architect. I cannot explain this, but there it is. So I got some of the things that I want from a novel—distraction, absorption, a taste of humanity. Maybe it’s the humanity that makes Seven Years worthwhile. The narrator comes alive as an individual, as a friend—someone I know intimately, at least for a while. Yes, and thankfully, only for a short while.

I read this book in the original German which is relatively easy, clear, and simple. This novel is unlike so much German literature which has a marchenhaft quality: e.g Kafka, Hesse, even Mann. Seven Years is brutally, painfully, realistic. At some points I checked the translation by Michael Hofmann. It, like the German, is simple and clear, but Hofmann does take some liberties and strays from exact fidelity to the original in places (for no apparent reason that I could see).
Seven Years download epub
Literary
Author: Peter Stamm
ISBN: 1847085091
Category: Literature & Fiction
Subcategory: Literary
Language: English
Publisher: Granta (April 1, 2012)