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by Lois-Ann Yamanaka


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I thoroughly I was still at the Writer's Workshop when I first heard Lois Ann Yamanaka read selections from her book, Saturday Night at the Pahala Theatre

I thoroughly I was still at the Writer's Workshop when I first heard Lois Ann Yamanaka read selections from her book, Saturday Night at the Pahala Theatre. A friend played it for me. She had a cassette of Yamanaka reading her poems.

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Only 2 left in stock (more on the way). Still, I do commend this book, especially since Yamanaka did not go with a Hollywood ending and gave Toni a more realistic ending for a person such as her. Besides the interesting story line, the characters of this novel jump out at the reader and make the story that more compelling. I especially liked the character of Sheldon, Toni's gay brother, and his dream of being a hairdresser.

by Lois-Ann Yamanaka You can always count on a crowd outside Heads by Harry, the Yagyuu family's taxidermy shop in Hilo, where the regulars gather every day to drink beer, eat smoked meat.

by Lois-Ann Yamanaka. You can always count on a crowd outside Heads by Harry, the Yagyuu family's taxidermy shop in Hilo, where the regulars gather every day to drink beer, eat smoked meat, and pontificate into the pau hana hours. But above the shop, where the family lives, life isn't so predictable. Toni Yagyuu, the middle child, has enough on her hands dealing with her budding diva of a little sister.

Yamanaka, Lois-Ann, 1961-. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books. Uploaded by LannetteF on August 13, 2010. SIMILAR ITEMS (based on metadata). Terms of Service (last updated 12/31/2014).

The conclusion to Honolulu poet and novelist Yamanaka's raffish trilogy (Wild Meat and the Bully Burgers, 1996; Blu's Hanging, 1997) is another agreeably comic tale of growing up absurd amid the natural beauty and polyracial confusion of t. .

The conclusion to Honolulu poet and novelist Yamanaka's raffish trilogy (Wild Meat and the Bully Burgers, 1996; Blu's Hanging, 1997) is another agreeably comic tale of growing up absurd amid the natural beauty and polyracial confusion of the islands. The relentlessly episodic story is narrated by Toni Yagyuyu, middle child of a Japanese-American family whose father, the eponymous Harry, runs the taxidermy shop above which his unruly family live.

A hilarious, poignant new novel by the author of Wild Meat and the Bully Burgers

You can always count on a crowd outside Heads by Harry, the Yagyuu family's taxidermy shop in Hilo, where the regulars gather every day to drink beer, eat smoked meat, and pontificate into the pau hana hours.

Lois-Ann Yamanaka's fiction focuses on young, working-class Japanese-Americans from Hawaii who struggle with such typical issues of adolescence as sexual development and peer acceptance while coming to terms with their cultural identity as the descendants of Japanese immigrant.

Lois-Ann Yamanaka's fiction focuses on young, working-class Japanese-Americans from Hawaii who struggle with such typical issues of adolescence as sexual development and peer acceptance while coming to terms with their cultural identity as the descendants of Japanese immigrant laborers. Yamanaka once said,' My work involves bringing to the page the utter complexity, ferocious beauty and sometimes absurdity of our ethnic relationships here in the islands.

Lois-Ann Yamanaka (born September 7, 1961) is an American poet and novelist from Hawaiʻi. Many of her literary works are written in Hawaiian Pidgin, and some of her writing has dealt with controversial ethnic issues. In particular, her works confront themes of Asian American families and the local culture of Hawaiʻi. Lois-Ann Yamanaka was born September 7, 1961 in Hoʻolehua on the island of Molokaʻi, Hawaiʻi

Lois-Ann Yamanaka's new novel tells the story of the Yagyuu family, who live in Hilo above Heads by Harry, the family's taxidermy shop.

Lois-Ann Yamanaka's new novel tells the story of the Yagyuu family, who live in Hilo above Heads by Harry, the family's taxidermy shop. Every day a group of opinionated old futs from the neighborhood gathers outside Harry . s shop, where they discuss everyone in town (loudly) and drink beer and eat smoked meat into the pau hana hours. Back at home, things aren't quite as simple.

You can always count on a crowd outside Heads by Harry, the Yagyuu family's taxidermy shop in Hilo, where the regulars gather every day to drink beer, eat smoked meat, and pontificate into the pau hana hours.  But above the shop, where the family lives, life isn't so predictable. Toni Yagyuu, the middle child, has enough on her hands dealing with her budding diva of a little sister.  But it is the men in her life that really have her running in circles: a flamboyant older brother who wants to be a hairdresser, a stubborn father who refuses to accept her into the family business, and the Santos brothers--two pig-hunting, ex-high school football players who don't know what to think of their headstrong, outspoken neighbor.

Comments: (7)

Levion
Lois-Ann Yamanaka is a gifted and compelliing writer. I have all her novels in my permanent collection (and it is tough to make the cut and land on the Keeper shelves).
Anarus
HEADS BY HARRY by Lois-Ann Yamanaka

March 26, 2005

I read this book last summer while vacationing on Maui, the almost-perfect place to read a book that takes place in Hawaii. In HEADS BY HARRY, main character Toni Yagyuu is telling her story of what her life is like living on the big island of Hawaii.

Toni is the middle child of a lower middle class Japanese American family. Her father, Harry O, is the local taxidermist, and it seems like she's being groomed to take over the family business one of these days. The novel details the dysfunctional life that Toni is growing up in, while at the same time it is shown with a touch of humor. I always find Yamanaka's books very interesting, showing a different side to the Japanese American experience that is so far apart from that of those living on the mainland. While there is a lot of humor in this book, I found it more tragic than funny, and although Toni always finds a way to come up on top, the ending to this story is one that I had hoped could have been avoided. Still, I do commend this book, especially since Yamanaka did not go with a Hollywood ending and gave Toni a more realistic ending for a person such as her.

Besides the interesting story line, the characters of this novel jump out at the reader and make the story that more compelling. I especially liked the character of Sheldon, Toni's gay brother, and his dream of being a hairdresser. I had a hard time liking a lot of the other characters, mainly because they were mean spirited, a product of their environment. The reader will watch Toni grow up and eventually make a go at it in college. It is almost painful to watch her try and fail, her dreams always too far to reach.

HEADS BY HARRY is yet another novel by Yamanaka that takes the reader into the life of the Japanese American living on the Hawaiian Islands. The culture in itself is fascinating to read about, and while this was an interesting read, this reader enjoyed BLU'S HANGING much more. Both books are tragicomedies, a type of book that maybe not all readers will enjoy.
Jaiarton
What an amazing writer! Yet, I've now read three books by this wonderful author, and the redundancy of the themes is ruining my experience. Why do all the characters have to end with such downtrodden lives, where the girls get pregnant by the middle of the book, the sister is a wannabe diva, and the father and mother just plain don't care?
As for the stereotypes, I think that the stereotypes bring the book alive. You're not supposed to really question the motives of the characters, but instead see how they play out in terms of the main character's life.
Think about it -- if the stereotypical chauvanistic men were sensitive and thoughtful in the book, read Shakespeare, drank port wine instead of beer and snorted coke, remained monogamous, and spoke proper English, would the book be interesting? They're part of the tension that lies in Toni Yagyuu's life, and help shape the experience around her. If they were proper young men, would we really discover that Maverick and Wyatt actually had a sensitive side? Would we even be dealing with the issue of her not knowing who the father was? No, because they'd be acting perfectly from page one, and wouldn't both be sleeping with Toni at the same time. The lives of the characters simply cannot be perfect in order to have a book with a decent plot.
However, the lives of the characters shouldn't be played out over and over and over and over in each work Ms. Yamanaka writes. It's really beginning to disappoint me.
Monam
The sublime heights Lois-Ann Yamanaka has previously reached only intensifies my disappointment at the downhill slide this book represents. 'Saturday Night At The Pahala Theater' (Bamboo Ridge Press) established her as the standard in 'local' literature in Hawai'i and was nothing short of a revelation for me and other locals without a recognized literary voice all these years. But now she seems content to churn out 'quick-n-dirty' rehashings of her original themes. In contrast with her earlier work, I failed to find any redeeming qualities in any of her characters (except, ironically perhaps, the transplanted mainland haole). Even crediting them for their somewhat unenviable(though still decidedly middle-class) circumstances, the only feeling these characters elicited from me was an intense desire to slap them all upside the head. I agree with the others that Yamanaka still excels in capturing the senses, images, and moods of local living. But I'm struggling to find the ultimate point of her writing as of late. Her early work stared uncompromisingly into the dark side of local culture, but always transcended it in the end. If nothing else, one always found redemption in the telling. Now, there's a disturbingly voyueristic aspect to her storytelling, almost as if all the dysfunctionalism and tragedy is something simply to be displayed (or worse yet, glamorized) for bestseller-reading audiences. Seems to me like Yamanaka's work has turned -- dare I say it -- cheap.
Rarranere
I loved this book possibly even more than the rest Yamanaka has written. Her voice speaks as clearly through the female narrator as it does through her "in the closet" brother, brutish suitor, and old fashioned family. Yamanaka does a masterful job at showing both the full picture of the underclass in Hawaii, as now the middle class thanks to this story. This book takes you into not just Hawaii, but into all family relations, all over the world. There is no author to date I have found able to make each character as vivacious. I just cant wait for her next book to come out. This author has gotten me started looking for similar novels, though I have not yet found any to compare to the candor and heartfelt emotion in her own works. If you are looking for a story of family trials and tribulations, love and loss, and the beauty of the Islands, look no further.
Heads By Harry download epub
Literary
Author: Lois-Ann Yamanaka
ISBN: 0380733161
Category: Literature & Fiction
Subcategory: Literary
Language: English
Publisher: Harper Perennial; Paper edition edition (March 7, 2000)
Pages: 320 pages