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Late Nights on Air download epub

by Elizabeth Hay


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Elizabeth Hay's eloquence and utter humanity has nearly struck me dumb.

Elizabeth Hay's eloquence and utter humanity has nearly struck me dumb. LATE NIGHTS ON AIR is a literary gem, written from an omniscient point-of-view with love and care for its several main characters, who have all been turned and polished so that all of their facets and flaws are revealed under the light of careful and appreciative reading. And I did appreciate these fictional folks, make no mistake, all of whom worked at a small Northern Services radio station in Yellowknife, Northwest Territory, an historical settlement on the shore of Great Slave Lake.

Late Nights on Air book. Elizabeth Hay worked as a radio broadcaster in Yellowknife forty years ago, and she revisits that isolated area in Late Nights on Air. Set in 1975, it was a time when radio was being replaced by television. The environment and the northern way of life was also being threatened by a proposal to cross the frozen Canadian tundra with a gas pipeline.

Elizabeth Hay. His old friend, bearded, big-bellied Abe Lamont, set himself up in the studio at the baize-covered table, and that first day Abe saw every member of staff who worked on air, one at a time, for half . .It was easier if you had no illusions and little experience. Jim Murphy, a broadcaster for fifteen years, emerged from his initial meeting looking sour and asking Dido what fatuous meant. Dido went in eagerly, but also came out chastened and annoyed. Abe had told her that her delivery was almost too perfect, he’d warned her against sounding antiseptic

Elizabeth Grace Hay (born October 22, 1951) is a Canadian novelist and short story writer. Her 2007 novel Late Nights on Air won the Giller Prize.

Elizabeth Grace Hay (born October 22, 1951) is a Canadian novelist and short story writer. Her first novel A Student of Weather (2000) was a finalist for the Giller Prize and won the CAA MOSAID Technologies Award for Fiction and the TORGI Award. She has been a finalist for the Governor General's Award twice, for her short-story collection Small Change in 1997 and her novel Garbo Laughs in 2003.

Elizabeth Hay has been compared to Annie Proulx, Alice Hoffman, and Isabel Allende, yet she is uniquely herself. With unforgettable characters, vividly evoked settings, in this new novel, Hay brings to bear her skewering intelligence into the frailties of the human heart and her ability to tell a spellbinding story. Late Nights on Air. 388 printed pages. To read this book, upload an EPUB or FB2 file to Bookmate. Its 1975 when beautiful Dido Paris arrives at the radio station in Yellowknife, a frontier town in the Canadian north.

Late nights on air. by. Hay, Elizabeth, 1951-.

I like to write with a pen or pencil on paper. I have a rocking chair with wide arms in my second-floor study. I sit in the chair, place a piece of plywood across the arms and write on that flat surface. I got the idea from reading about Virginia Woolf, who worked the same way in the grubby back of the house where they printed the books for Hogarth Press. It gives me much more peace of mind to work this way than directly in front of a computer screen.

In Late Nights on Air, which was awarded Canada’s Giller Prize in 2007, many people tell other people many things . Desire and unspoken longing infuse the air at the station, seeping out into the streets of Yellowknife and even the tundra beyond

In Late Nights on Air, which was awarded Canada’s Giller Prize in 2007, many people tell other people many things - and many of them are very interesting. Concocting a story from the entanglements and longings of a group of transplanted people working at a small radio station in the Canadian north (Yellowknife, to be exact) back in the 1970s is so old-fashioned as to appear nervy. Desire and unspoken longing infuse the air at the station, seeping out into the streets of Yellowknife and even the tundra beyond. But if a heart breaks in the northern reaches of Canada and no one hears it, does it make a sound?

The eagerly anticipated novel from the bestselling author of A Student of Weather and Garbo Laughs. Harry Boyd, a hard-bitten refugee from failure in Toronto television, has returned to a small radio station in the Canadian North. There, in Yellowknife, in the summer of 1975, he falls in love with a voice on air, though the real woman, Dido Paris, is both a surprise and even more than he imagined. Dido and Harry are part of the cast of eccentric, utterly loveable characters, all transplants from elsewhere, who form an unlikely group at the station. Their loves and longings, their rivalries and entanglements, the stories of their pasts and what brought each of them to the North, form the centre. One summer, on a canoe trip four of them make into the Arctic wilderness (following in the steps of the legendary Englishman John Hornby, who, along with his small party, starved to death in the barrens in 1927), they find the balance of love shifting, much as the balance of power in the North is being changed by the proposed Mackenzie Valley gas pipeline, which threatens to displace Native people from their land.Elizabeth Hay has been compared to Annie Proulx, Alice Hoffman, and Isabel Allende, yet she is uniquely herself. With unforgettable characters, vividly evoked settings, in this new novel, Hay brings to bear her skewering intelligence into the frailties of the human heart and her ability to tell a spellbinding story. Written in gorgeous prose, laced with dark humour, Late Nights on Air is Hay’s most seductive and accomplished novel yet.On the shortest night of the year, a golden evening without end, Dido climbed the wooden steps to Pilot’s Monument on top of the great Rock that formed the heart of old Yellowknife. In the Netherlands the light was long and gradual too, but more meadowy, more watery, or else hazier, depending on where you were. . . . Here, it was subarctic desert, virtually unpopulated, and the light was uniformly clear.On the road below, a small man in a black beret was bending over his tripod just as her father used to bend over his tape recorder. Her father’s voice had become the wallpaper inside her skull, he’d made a home for himself there as improvised and unexpected as these little houses on the side of the Rock — houses with histories of instability, of changing from gambling den to barber shop to sheet metal shop to private home, and of being moved from one part of town to another since they had no foundations.From Late Nights On Air

Comments: (7)

Iaiastta
Where to even begin? Elizabeth Hay's eloquence and utter humanity has nearly struck me dumb. I loved this book, LATE NIGHTS ON AIR, so much that I didn't want it to end.

Canadian writers have fascinated me for years, maybe because I'm always so amazed that many great and well-known authors in Canada are all but UNknown here in the U.S. I remember discovering the funny and oh-so-human Smith and Other Events: Tales of the Chilcotin by Paul St Pierre many years ago. And of course there is always Farley Mowat, who is pretty well-known down here in the 48, probably mostly for his memoir, Never Cry Wolf : Amazing True Story of Life Among Arctic Wolves. But his other two memoirs, Born Naked: The Early Adventures of the Author of Never Cry Wolf and And No Birds Sang (The Farley Mowat Series) are equally good, and they are all but invisible here in this country.

And there is Linden MacIntyre, the award-winning CBC journalist, with his Cape Breton novel trilogy and his lovely memoir of that region Causeway: A Passage from Innocence. I simply can't understand how those books have not caught on here.

But now here is Elizabeth Hay, who has obviously been around for quite a while now and won some prestigious literary awards, and I am just now discovering her. Or thought I was, until I remembered I had read A Student of Weather some years back, a book I found, sadly, in a remainder bin. (Where I often find some of the very best books.)

LATE NIGHTS ON AIR is a literary gem, written from an omniscient point-of-view with love and care for its several main characters, who have all been turned and polished so that all of their facets and flaws are revealed under the light of careful and appreciative reading. And I did appreciate these fictional folks, make no mistake, all of whom worked at a small Northern Services radio station in Yellowknife, Northwest Territory, an historical settlement on the shore of Great Slave Lake.

First there is Harry, a embittered veteran of radio who peaked early, tried TV and failed, and is now, in his mid-forties, back where he started twenty years before.

The story unfolds in the mid-70s and begins with Harry hearing a voice on his own radio station, a late night radio voice that he hasn't heard before. The voice belongs to Dido Paris, a new hire, a beautiful young woman with a past and indeterminate sexual preferences, who leaves her lasting mark on Harry, as well as on all the other people whose lives she touches.

There is Eleanor Dew, the station's receptionist, who has her own unusual story which includes a brief unconsummated marriage. And Ralph, the station's book reviewer and nature photographer. And Eddie, a Vietnam vet and the station technician, and Harry's rival for Dido's affections.

But the novel's central character is Gwen, young and - mostly - innocent, still groping for her proper place in life, looking for a start in radio. Under Harry's guidance and Eleanor's friendship she gradually grows from a frightened young broadcaster into a confident and inventive late night radio personality with her own persona, 'Stella Round.'

Also key to the novel's forward impetus is the story of the Canadian explorer of the Barrens, John Hornby. Harry, Eleanor, Gwen and Ralph are all so fascinated by this man's legend and tragic end that they embark on a summer canoe trip retracing Hornby's last journey. (Both Hornby's trip and the retracing of it by this novel's characters made me remember Jon Krakauer's bestseller, Into the Wild.) And there is also the subtheme of an ongoing study by a federally appointed judge of the effects a planned pipeline would have on the fragile arctic ecosystem.

LATE NIGHTS ON AIR makes use of both of the most common themes in fiction: 'a new person comes to town' and 'someone goes on a journey.' And they are used and interwoven in a masterful manner. The book is filled with wonderful details that evoked so many memories and associations. The mention of Miles Davis' seminal album, Kind of Blue, made me remember my own introduction to that jazz masterpiece, at a remote army base in northern Turkey. The book's very title, and its theme, evoked memories of other more obscure but favorite albums like Katy Moffatt's Midnight Radioand Earl Klugh's Late Night Guitar. And the description of the travelers' encounter with a massive herd of migrating caribou brought to mind Mowat's own similar experience in the aforementioned NEVER CRY WOLF.

There is nothing forced or contrived in LATE NIGHTS ON AIR. It has elements of tragedy, humor, and pathos. But what shines through the strongest is its utter humanity. As I said earlier, I wanted the story to go on and on. But its ending, while certainly not a happily-ever-after conventional sort of ending, is richly, deeply, and profoundly satisfying. I loved this book and recommend it highly.

- Tim Bazzett, author of the memoir, BOOKLOVER
Prinna
I read this book in anticipation of traveling to Yellowknife, NWT. It was such a fine introduction to a distant place. The pacing of the book, which many online reviews criticize, was just about perfect, reminiscent of Jane Austen. It gives you time to enjoy the characters, the concepts, and the scenery. The second part of the book--out of Yellowknife and up to the Barren Lands--was a significant transition. I missed some of the characters who'd been in the first half of the book, and was jarred that a seeming minor character from the first half was now a major character. Nonetheless, the description of that beautiful wilderness beckoned me. I would definitely recommend this book, particularly to someone who plans to visit Yellowknife.
anneli
"...this summer of 1975 took on the mythical quality of a cloudless summer before the outbreak of war, or before the onset of the kind of restlessness, social, spiritual, that remakes the world."

In the Canadian Northwest territories, a place of harsh winters and summers of unrelenting light, the hamlet of Yellowknife remains like an anachronism. Population ten thousand, including native people that have lived on this land for thousands of years; it was their flesh and blood. Now the Mackenzie Pipeline project, a huge construction of an oil and gas pipeline, threatens to "rip open open the Arctic...like a razor slashing the face of the Mona Lisa."

A little radio station of the CBC is the center of the novel. Harry Boyd, the 40-something interim manager, whose luckless history of ill-repute but brilliance has brought him back to radio after a wash with TV, is an unlikely romantic. He has fallen in love with the sound of Dido Paris on air, a resonant, smoky-voiced and Netherlands-born young woman of unconventional beauty, a wide-shouldered, slim-hipped enigma of melancholy temperament. She was hired as a parting shot of the former manager.

Gwen Symon, a mousy young girl-woman from Ontario, has bravely driven herself in her Boler trailer all the way to Yellowknife to work in radio. She listened to a radio show as a child called "Death on the Barren Ground," about John Hornby, the Englishman who starved to death on an Arctic adventure into the Barrens in 1927. She has since read his biography, three times! Harry is familiar with Hornby's history and his biographer, who lives close by. He is willing to be patient with Gwen's parched and defenseless voice.

Eleanor Dew is the point person or office manager at Yellowknife radio, a woman who manages to be pretty even though no part of her is pretty. She is a striving poet and a thoughtful friend to everyone.

Eddy Fitzgerlad is the cipher, a radio technician of unknown other talents, a well-cut but terse, insolent man, an unsettling presence in the radio station, with his eye on Dido.

Ralph Cody is the radio book reviewer and prodigious photographer of the far North Canadian landscape, with small nicotine-stained hands that are deft with a camera and tripod.

This cast of well-drawn, unforgettable characters, as well as some lively secondary characters, is the driving force of the novel. Hay's sumptuous sense of place, redolent of author Jane Urquhart (but more droll), and her precision with character building, fuels the story with an electric and kinetic buzz. Her use of radio as an extended metaphor, her vast store of literary allusions, and her buoyant linguistic play are the ingredients that make for an intelligent and contoured novel. The back story of the proposed pipeline add dimension and depth to the tale.

During the summer, four of these characters agree to a six-week Arctic adventure by land and canoe to visit the place of John Hornby's exploration and death. The Barrens were the rugged, treeless, and desolate landscape of the interior Arctic. This would be a mighty challenge for the group, even in summer. The adventure is filled with drama and a supple examination of the human spirit. All four of the radio adventurers will be put to a supreme test of inner and outer strength and tenacity.

This is the first book I have read by Elizabeth Hay. I am a delighted admirer of her work now, and I look forward to reading her previous novels. Highly recommended for readers interested in solid and original characters, evocative depiction of landscape, and piercing themes of human survival.
Vikus
This was a book that grew on me. I wasn’t sure at first and maybe wouldn’t have stuck with it if it hadn’t been for it being a book club read. I’m so glad that I did....The characters and their spirits were intertwined with a sense of place. It will be one of those novels that will stay with me.
Vonalij
In this book by Canadian writer Elizabeth Hay give us a story with many facets, interesting characters and troubling events in a harsh and secluded place. Once I got started I couldn't stop. I highly recommend this book
Late Nights on Air download epub
Literary
Author: Elizabeth Hay
ISBN: 0771040199
Category: Literature & Fiction
Subcategory: Literary
Language: English
Publisher: Emblem Editions (April 1, 2008)
Pages: 376 pages