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Middle Eastern Mythology: From the Assyrians to the Hebrews (Penguin religion & mythology) download epub

by S. H. Hooke


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Middle Eastern Mythology book. Paperback, 208 pages. Middle Eastern Mythology, .

Middle Eastern Mythology book. Published May 30th 1963 by Penguin Books (first published 1963). Hooke The role of mythology in ritual and in the origins of customs, cults, and hero worship are the fascinating areas covered by this comparative survey. It discusses legends of the Egyptians, Babylonians, Assyrians, Hittites, and Canaanites, plus mythological elements of the Jewish apocalyptic literature and the New Testament.

Middle Eastern Mythology has been added to your Cart. The longest chapter is that on Hebrew mythology, and indeed for us readers in the West the main point of interest in Middle Eastern mythology is no doubt the Bible. Hooke shows how the mythic parts of Genesis (Creation, Cain and Abel, the Flood, et. relate to similar tales in the other Middle Eastern cultures, and shows briefly and clearly how the Bible itself contains several mutually inconsistent myths of its own. The chapter which seemed the most sketchy to me was that on Egyptian mythology-a vast field which Hooke treats in just 14 short pages.

Subtitle on cover: from the Assyrians to the Hebrews. London ; New York : Penguin Books. I know we could charge money, but then we couldn’t achieve our mission. To bring the best, most trustworthy information to every internet reader. The Great Library for all. The Internet Archive is a bargain, but we need your help. inlibrary; printdisabled; ; china.

Middle East mythology includes: mythologies of the Ancient Near East. Mesopotamian mythology. Ancient Egyptian mythology. mythologies of individual ethnicities of the Middle East. Middle Eastern folklore (disambiguation).

Middle eastern mythology. from Professor J. R. Pritchard's Ancient Near Eastern Texts relating to the Old Testament

Middle eastern mythology. Samuel Henry Hooke was born at Cirencester in 1874 and educated at St Mark's School, Windsor, and Jesus College, Oxford, where he won several scholarships. Penguin Books Ltd, Harmondsworth, Middlesex, England. In. 71 lo. Ambassador Court, Baltimore, Maryland 21207, . Pritchard's Ancient Near Eastern Texts relating to the Old Testament; Press for permission to quote. also to the Falcon's.

Mythology Among the Hebrews and Its Historical Developmentby Ignaz Goldziher. Middle Eastern Mythologyby Samuel Henry Hooke. The Religions of Ancient Egypt and BabyloniaThe Gifford Lectures on the Ancient Egyptian and Babylonian, Conception of the Divine, Delivered in Aberdeenby A. H. Sayce. The Nine WorldsStories From Norse Mythologyby Mary Elizabeth Litchfield. Ancient Hebrew Stories and Their Modern Interpretationby William George Jordan. The Book of the DeadWith Twenty-Five Illustrationsby British Museum.

The role of mythology in ritual and its place in the origins of customs, cults, and hero worship are the fascinating subjects of this comparative survey

The role of mythology in ritual and its place in the origins of customs, cults, and hero worship are the fascinating subjects of this comparative survey. Based on firsthand sources, it recounts legends of the Egyptians, Babylonians, Assyrians, Hittites, and Canaanites, in addition to discussing the mythological elements of Jewish apocalyptic literature and the New Testament.

Middle Eastern Mythology (1963). Promise and fulfilment; essays presented to Professor . The Resurrection of Christ as History and Experience (1967). This article about a translator of the Bible is a stub. From the Assyrians to the Hebrews (Penguin Religion and Mythology). Published May 30, 1963 by Penguin (Non-Classics). Egyptian Mythology, Middle Eastern Mythology, Semitic Mythology.

Professor Hooke shows how mythology can play a role in ritual, how it can explain the origin of a custom or cult and glorify a hero, tribe or city. All of these functions are relevant to the strange and haunting myths of the Mesopotamians, Egyptians, Canaanites and Hittites, slowly revealed by decades of archaeological research and retold here. Yet it is also these early religious traditions that underlie the familiar stories of Genesis, Noah's flood and the Garden of Eden. Even the Nativity and Resurrection narratives, whatever their basis in fact, can be paralleled elsewhere. We ought, in other words, to consider the Middle East as a single unit and to look at the Bible in that context.

Comments: (7)

sobolica
I thought these would be the actual stories, but it turned out to be a study of the myths. Very well done, but I was disappointed.
Nejind
Is good reading, got here just fine!
Na
This book was written more than 45 years ago and it shows; there have been much new data on middle eastern mythology, particularly concerning Judeo-Christian mythology.

Hooke, unlike Joseph Campbell in his books, shows his obvious pro-Christian bias: "we have in the birth narratives of the gospels an extension of the function of myth as a vehicle for CONVEYING TRUTHS which lie outside the range of historical evidence" (p172-3). This is a contradictory statement, truths have evidence, otherwise they are just dogma (a religious doctrine that is proclaimed as true without proof); this statement is based on Christian dogma, not fact. The new testament was written by Hebrews/Early Christians after Jesus had been dead awhile to elevate him to god-like status; there is no written documentation on the life of Jesus from anyone who lived while Jesus lived; however, Hooke seemed to think the new testament writings were actually done by people who personally knew Jesus.

If you want mythology overviews that are objective and up-to-date, look for it elsewhere; preferably one written within the last decade or so.
Ionzar
This book has been republished a number of times now and that is probably due to its addressing of a subject that is bound to repeatedly be of interest to a number of people. In a nutshell this brief book discusses a range of myths from the Middle East. It does not claim to be an encyclopaedia of that areas mythology and deities nor does it claim to contain every story of each of the cultures that have come and gone over the years in the region in question. Nor does it set out to any form of historical work in a chronological sense though perforce there is some discussion of the chronology of different cultures in order to discuss their influence on each other.

What the book does do is to present a number of salient stories in readable laymans prose from a range of early cultures of the area. What we also get is a look at how many of the stories many would think of as being from the Christian Bible were quite obviously drawn from earlier works. I'm guessing that might ruffle a few feathers but the author does not dally about with looking too deeply into that aspect of things, he merely draws parallels and leaves it at that.

This isn't a bad book for your history bookshelf though there are undoubtedly far more brightly presented and illustrated works on Middle Eastern pantheons and the like and certainly many of them probably benefit from more recent archaeological work that has been done since its inception and some that will look more thoroughly at individual cultures rather than this broader based work.
Gralmeena
This concise, authoritative text gives an excellent overview of the myths of the ancient Middle East and their interconnections.

I bought this little Pelican paperback in January 1986, which reminds me that I got it while researching my novel Truth of the Python. Now, working on a new opus also set partly in the ancient Near East, I find myself dipping into it again. My copy is mostly disintegrated, but it’s also heavily highlighted.

My own introduction to mythology had been by way of Carl Jung and then Joseph Campbell, both of whom I admire deeply. But brilliant and deep as those scholars were, I find myself leaning on the introduction to S. H. Hooke’s little book when I’m looking to remind myself of what myths are. In the first paragraph Hooke says

"The myth is a product of human imagination arising out of a definite situation and intended to do something. Hence the right question to ask about the myth is not, 'Is it true?' but 'What is it intended to do?'"

Using this simple, pragmatic question, Hooke discerns five types of myth:

1 the ritual myth
2 the myth of origin
3 the cult myth
4 the prestige myth
5 the eschatological myth

He gives a brief description of each, and notes how the diffusion and combination of myths can be partly traced by various methods. Then, having laid the groundwork of the subject and his method in 7 short pages, he launches into the main text, in which he summarizes and discusses Mesopotamian, Egyptian, Ugaritic, Hittite, and Hebrew mythology, and follows that with a look at the role of myth in Jewish apocalyptic and in Christianity. It’s a huge field of survey, which the author makes seem both full and unhurried.

The longest chapter is that on Hebrew mythology, and indeed for us readers in the West the main point of interest in Middle Eastern mythology is no doubt the Bible. Hooke shows how the mythic parts of Genesis (Creation, Cain and Abel, the Flood, etc.) relate to similar tales in the other Middle Eastern cultures, and shows briefly and clearly how the Bible itself contains several mutually inconsistent myths of its own.

The chapter which seemed the most sketchy to me was that on Egyptian mythology—a vast field which Hooke treats in just 14 short pages. Nonetheless, the myths that he does treat are well chosen and simply described.

In all, this is an excellent survey of material that is hard to find all in one place, especially at this short length, and with this level of authority. In that respect it is almost like a briefing document. If you’re wondering, Why should I care about Middle Eastern mythology?, this is a good, quick way to find out.
Malhala
I am so glad I found out about this book. Reading it was a major eye opener for me in understanding the early myths from the area where my own (former) religion originated. S. H. Hooke is an expert in mythology, and he does a fantastic job of showing the connections between the myths of the Middle East. For me personally, this helped me see how the roots of Christianity (particularly with ancient Hebrew religions) was inspired greatly by earlier myths. Whether it was the author's intention or not, it also helped me realize that the religion I once thought was real was, in fact, nothing more than a myth that was not unlike so many similar myths of the time and place.

Jeff Mark, author of Christian No More
Maridor
This book provided a fascinating review of early Middle Eastern mythology starting from Mesopotamian culture and proceeding through to Judaism and early Christianity. It also includes a discussion of the importance of myth and ritual as a basis for religious and socialogical structure. The area I found most interesting was the discussion of the influence of the mythology of early civilizations on Judeo-Christian belief and scripture.
Middle Eastern Mythology: From the Assyrians to the Hebrews (Penguin religion & mythology) download epub
Mythology & Folk Tales
Author: S. H. Hooke
ISBN: 0140136878
Category: Literature & Fiction
Subcategory: Mythology & Folk Tales
Language: English
Publisher: Penguin Books (May 30, 1963)
Pages: 208 pages