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Storytracking: Texts, Stories, and Histories in Central Australia download epub

by Sam D. Gill


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бесплатно, без регистрации и без смс. This innovative work takes a narrative technique (known as "e;storytracking"e;) practiced by Australian aboriginal peoples and applies it to the academic study of their culture

бесплатно, без регистрации и без смс. This innovative work takes a narrative technique (known as "e;storytracking"e;) practiced by Australian aboriginal peoples and applies it to the academic study of their culture. Gill's purpose is to get as close as possible to the perceptions and beliefs of these indigenous peoples by stripping away the layers of European interpretation and construction. His technique involves comparing the versions of aboriginal texts presented in academic reports with the text versions as they appear in each report's cited sources.

бесплатно, без регистрации и без смс.

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Storytracking is a work of theory and application  .

The Skinny: This texts theoretical contributions far outweigh its deliberate focus on Australian history. It is a valuable text for anthropologists, ethnographers, historians, and religious studies scholars. Minus one star for its exorbitant list price

The Skinny: This texts theoretical contributions far outweigh its deliberate focus on Australian history. Minus one star for its exorbitant list price. One danger that scholars face is the obliteration of subjects.

Sam Gill writes about Central Australia, but, more importantly, he writes about the business of trying to live responsibly and decisively in a postmodern world faced with irreconcilable diversity and complexity, with undeniable ambiguity and uncertainty

Sam Gill writes about Central Australia, but, more importantly, he writes about the business of trying to live responsibly and decisively in a postmodern world faced with irreconcilable diversity and complexity, with undeniable ambiguity and uncertainty. It presents descriptions of an important aboriginal culture-the Arrernte-and it critically examines ethnography.

Gill follows the chain of citations along, uncovering the story, or as he calls it the "storytrack," that interconnects scholar with scholar-independent subject. Gill begins by examining Mircea Eliade's influential analysis of an Australian myth, "Numbakulla and the Sacred Pole".

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This work takes a narrative technique (known as storytracking ) practiced by Australian aboriginal people and applies it to the academic study of their culture. It goes back to the field notes of the anthropologists who originally collected the story and by following the trail of publications, revisions, and retellings of this tale, it is able to show that Eliade's version bears almost no relation to the original and that the interpretations Eliade built around it is thus entirely a European construct, motivated largely by preconceptions about. the nature of religion.

ONE Storytracking the Arrente through the Academic Bush (page 3). Read. TWO Storytracking Toward Theory (page 20).

This innovative work takes a narrative technique (known as "storytracking") practiced by Australian aboriginal peoples and applies it to the academic study of their culture. Gill's purpose is to get as close as possible to the perceptions and beliefs of these indigenous peoples by stripping away the layers of European interpretation and construction. His technique involves comparing the versions of aboriginal texts presented in academic reports with the text versions as they appear in each report's cited sources. The comparison helps reveal the extent to which the text is transformed through its presentation. Gill follows the chain of citations along, uncovering the story, or as he calls it the "storytrack," that interconnects scholar with scholar-independent subject. The storytrack reveals the various academic operations--translations, editing, conflation, interpretation--that serve to build a bridge connecting subject and scholarly report.Gill begins by examining Mircea Eliade's influential analysis of an Australian myth, "Numbakulla and the Sacred Pole." He goes back to the field notes of the anthropologists who originally collected the story and by following the trail of publications, revisions, and retellings of this tale is able to show that Eliade's version bears almost no relation to the original and that the interpretations Eliade built around it is thus entirely a European construct, motivated largely by preconceptions about the nature of religion. By applying this method to other received texts of aboriginal religion, Gill is able to bring us closer than ever before to the worldview of this vanishing culture. At the same time, his work constitutes an important statement on and critique of the academic study of religion as it has traditionally been practiced.

Comments: (2)

Malien
Book Review: Sam D. Gill's Storytracking: Texts, Stories, and Histories in Central Australia

The Skinny: This texts theoretical contributions far outweigh its deliberate focus on Australian history. It is a valuable text for anthropologists, ethnographers, historians, and religious studies scholars. Minus one star for its exorbitant list price.

One danger that scholars face is the obliteration of subjects. Without getting into any of the theoretical background for this contention, we should accept (as a working proposition) that when we talk about others we are always already translating and interpreting and recontextualizing. If an informant tells you something, then you can hope to transcribe it accurately, but when you USE this quotation in a scholarly work you will inevitably reframe it for your own purposes. This leads to distortion, and this is especially true for those scholars who have studied Australia's aborigines.

To start with let's take the instructive example of JZ Smith and Mircea Eliade. Both wrote about the arrente in Australia. Both relied heavily on secondary sources. Yet each scholar managed to incorporate the arrente into their work differently. On the one hand, we should expect differences. However, the other hand wags its nit-picky close-reading fingers at you. Gill skillfully deconstructs the "storytracks" created by these two scholars, identifying the differences in how they approach (and employ) their sources and explaining the implications for their interpretations. Here's the kicker: These differences reveal authors not subjects.

This is an important contribution on its own, but it is Gill's clear application of his method to get to this point that makes this volume worth reading. Gill calls this method storytracking, and it intentionally calls to mind not only the "tracks" that scholars leave behind when they create "stories," but also the implication that new works are always sleuthing around, sniffing for that lead that breaks the case. While this method is far more of an abstraction than a heuristic model for interrogating sources, it does inventively re-frame the scholarly enterprise as not necessarily subject-obliterating. The big question emerges if we accept that works by scholars (often) say much more about themselves than their subjects: How can we reveal our subjects more clearly? Gill is obviously in favor of greater transparency about the relationship betwixt and between sources, and while this helps pull layers of obfuscation of subjects, it does not render them transparent. Gill's method creates a space for greater clarity, but he has really only opened the door to the possibilities of his own method. We should all eagerly await the downstream implications of this important text.

PS: This book is AMAZINGLY expensive new. (What were the publishers thinking!) So be sure to grab a used copy!
Buge
Here's a book I'd wished to have encountered when it was published. Gill's expert reading of the relevant texts on Arrernte cultural practices is lucid and balanced. He traces the settlement of Central Australia and the path exploration paved for the subsequent ethnologists, contexturalizes their own social background and his own contribution to the field. Secondary and tertiary fields dominate the pages and Gill's wading through the aforementioned scholarship is riveting.
Storytracking: Texts, Stories, and Histories in Central Australia download epub
Mythology & Folk Tales
Author: Sam D. Gill
ISBN: 0195115872
Category: Literature & Fiction
Subcategory: Mythology & Folk Tales
Language: English
Publisher: Oxford University Press; 1 edition (February 12, 1998)
Pages: 304 pages