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by Pinckney Benedict


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Pinckney Benedict, The Wrecking Yard (Doubleday, 1992). Pinckney Benedict writes testosterone-fueled stories that seem, given the publication date of this book, almost to be a rebuttal to the Robert Blys and Sam Keens of the world

Pinckney Benedict, The Wrecking Yard (Doubleday, 1992). Pinckney Benedict writes testosterone-fueled stories that seem, given the publication date of this book, almost to be a rebuttal to the Robert Blys and Sam Keens of the world. I'm certainly glad someone was doing it. The ten stories here (actually, nine stories and one radio play) have an eighties-fiction feel about them; they are simple slices of life that don't seem to be about much of anything

Wrecking Yard, at this point, is way back in Benedict's career.

Wrecking Yard, at this point, is way back in Benedict's career. Atypical of an artist.

Pinckney Benedict was born in 1964. He grew up and continues to live on his family’s dairy farm, not far north of Lewisburg, West Virginia.

Часто встречающиеся слова и выражения. Pinckney Benedict was born in 1964. He holds a bachelor’s degree from Princeton University, where he studied creative writing with Joyce Carol Oates, and a master’s degree from the creative writing program of the University of Iowa.

The wrecking yard : stories. by. Benedict, Pinckney, 1964-. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books.

Pinckney Benedict (born 1964) is an American short-story writer and novelist whose work often reflects his Appalachian background. Benedict was raised in Greenbrier County, West Virginia, where his family had a dairy farm. He attended The Hill School in Pottstown, Pennsylvania, and graduated from Princeton University, where he studied primarily with Joyce Carol Oates, in 1986, and from the Iowa Writers’ Workshop at the University of Iowa in 1988.

Wrecking Yard - Pinckney Benedict. In this book he takes us back to a very much Pynchon-imbued 70s-era California that acts as something of microcosm for what he thought was going on back then. a fractal halo of complications that might go on forever.

Pinckney Benedict, The Wrecking Yard (Doubleday, 1992) Pinckney Benedict writes testosterone-fueled stories that seem, given the publication date of this book, almost to be a rebuttal to the Robert Blys and Sam Keens of the world

Pinckney Benedict, The Wrecking Yard (Doubleday, 1992) Pinckney Benedict writes testosterone-fueled stories that seem, given the publication date of this book, almost to be a rebuttal to the Robert Blys and Sam Keens of the world.

Pinckney Benedict’s world is a small-town one, real backwoods stuff, an. .

Pinckney Benedict’s world is a small-town one, real backwoods stuff, an angle which his publishers are not over-anxious to play down. He lives, apparently, on the family farm. The cover picture has him in smart check shirt and braces, no doubt chewing a slug of baccy. In ‘The Wrecking Yard’ a cop calls the wreckers ‘parasites on accidents, swarming around where blood collects’: but Benedict’s main point is that dead things are dead, whether young girls, stupid cows or furry little animals. Living on a farm, he should know. The ennui and self-doubt which afflicted the writer-hero in that book have been well and truly jettisoned in favour of a return to classic lines of storytelling in Sacred Hunger. He grew up and continues to live on his family's dairy farm, not far north of Lewisburg, West Virginia. He holds a bachelor's degree from Princeton University, where he studied creative writing with Joyce Carol Oates, and a master's degree from the creative writing program of the University of Iowa. Wrecking Yard by Pinckney Benedict (Paperback, softback). Brand new: lowest price.

A collection of short stories which illuminate, with imagery and humour, the darkest corners of the American soul  . A collection of short stories which illuminate, with imagery and humour, the darkest corners of the American soul. The author attempts to capture the personalities of rural America, shaped by poverty, cruelty and an odd compassion.

A collection of short stories which illuminate, with imagery and humour, the darkest corners of the American soul. The author attempts to capture the personalities of rural America, shaped by poverty, cruelty and an odd compassion.

Comments: (7)

Malann
Thanks to my creative writing professor, who loaned me this book (signed by Benedict), I now know one of the best short fiction writers living today. These stories are such a welcome depature from the abstract sentimentality that so many young writers are putting out these days. Benedict avoids all abstractions, keeping his fiction rooted in cold, hard, wonderful reality. The unsettling (and believable) weirdness of Benedict's rural environment comes through fantastically in stories like "Bounty" and "Odom", and then there's "Washman", which is so surreal that it's almost beyond description. The opening story, "Getting Over Arnette", is especially funny (if you like dark comedy).
Any serious reader of short fiction ought to read Pinckney Benedict.
Gardall
It sure did
Cenneel
Benedict shares some dark, chilling, and exciting tales with us. He is extremely talented, and the reader is able to feel the fear, anxiety, and sweat that cover the characters. Particularly compelling stories are Washman and Odom.
Malahelm
Pinckney Benedict, The Wrecking Yard (Doubleday, 1992)

Pinckney Benedict writes testosterone-fueled stories that seem, given the publication date of this book, almost to be a rebuttal to the Robert Blys and Sam Keens of the world. I'm certainly glad someone was doing it.

The ten stories here (actually, nine stories and one radio play) have an eighties-fiction feel about them; they are simple slices of life that don't seem to be about much of anything. However, sometime in the late eighties, writers began to take the eighties-fiction tenets and play with them, creating stories with the same mediocre presentation and writing really, really good stuff within the frame. Barry Hannah and Ethan Canin are obvious examples; Pinckney Benedict can be put on the same shelf. Where Hannah pokes his nose into the life of the American south, Benedict reins his vision in a little tighter, sticking with rural West Virginia, and the myriad strangenesses to be found there. For example, "Horton's Ape" deals with two travelers who find themselves at a roadside bar that has a small zoo out back; "Washman" deals with a mountain man who exacts a horrible revenge on a man who tries to kill his mule, and Washman's own punishment for his acts.

It's possible that the best story in the collection is "Rescuing Moon," about a man who goes to save a friend of his from life in a surreal nursing home. However, every reader will likely find a favorite in here, and it could be any of the ten pieces presented. All are written with the confidence of a guy who writes fine short stories, and knows it. Benedict is one of America's lesser-known literary lights, and that's a shame; his books are a lot of fun, in the same way Barry Hannah's are (and with, especially in this case in "Washman," the same genial mean-spiritedness that is likely to disturb more than a few readers). This is stuff worth reading. ****
Biaemi
Years and years ago, a writing instructor at my university recommended three authors to me: Arundhati Roy, Per Petterson, and Pinckney Benedict. Roy's novel The God of Small Things turned out to be one of my favorite books I have ever read. And Pinckney Benedict's collection of shorts The Wrecking Yard has been sitting on my shelf for years now, based on this instructor's recommendation, but never seemed to feel the pull to read it. I just finished it this morning and was fairly disappointed. Benedict's style is a little too blunt, as if he doesn't trust the readers with his sometimes powerful imagery. The Wrecking Yard is full of human and animal violence. Death abounds in each of these tales that sometimes read more like folklore. But I can't help feeling Benedict kept falling a little short, not quite clinching it in any of the stories except maybe one or two.

The rest of the review is over here: [...]
Dakora
I am 4 stories into this book and feel like I won the lottery. Am already searching for more books written by Pinckney Benedict. He's a rare gem in a box of stones when it comes to talented writers. All you have to do is Look Inside this book, to get the flavor of his talent. Can't wait to pick this book back up tonight.
HelloBoB:D
Will share this.
Who says the American short story isn't alive and well? So is the writer, Pinckney Benedict. A wonderful collection of stories. Bravo!
The Wrecking Yard download epub
Short Stories & Anthologies
Author: Pinckney Benedict
ISBN: 0436200627
Category: Literature & Fiction
Subcategory: Short Stories & Anthologies
Language: English
Publisher: Martin Secker & Warburg Ltd; First Edition edition (March 9, 1992)
Pages: 208 pages