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The Assassin's Song download epub

by M.G. Vassanji


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ALSO BY M. G. VASSANJI The In-Between World of Vikram Lall When She Was Queen Amriika The Book of Secrets Uhuru Street No New Land The Gunny Sack And song is no. The assassins song, .

ALSO BY M. The Assassin's Song, . 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 15 16 17 18 19 20 21 22 23 24 25 26 27 28 29 30 31 32 33 34. Also by M. vassanji. The In-Between World of Vikram Lall.

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Vassanji won the inaugural Giller Prize in 1994 for The Book of Secrets. In 2006, When She Was Queen was shortlisted for the City of Toronto Book Award

Vassanji won the inaugural Giller Prize in 1994 for The Book of Secrets. That year, he won the Harbourfront Festival Prize in recognition of his "achievement in and contribution to the world of letters. Hee was also one of twelve Canadians chosen for Maclean's Magazine's Honour Roll. In 2006, When She Was Queen was shortlisted for the City of Toronto Book Award. The Assassin's Song, released in 2007, was short-listed for the 2007 Giller Prize, the Rogers Prize, and the Governor General's Prize in Canada, as well as the Crossword Prize in India. In 2009 his travel memoir, A Place Within: Rediscovering India, won the Governor-General's Prize for nonfiction.

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The Assassin's Song is narrated through Karsan Dargawalla who is heir to the 700-year-old shrine of a. .

The Assassin's Song is narrated through Karsan Dargawalla who is heir to the 700-year-old shrine of a 13th century Sufi Nur Fazal. The shrine is in Gujarat, India. In this novel Vassanji attempts to convey an appreciation of the holy man tradition in India, while writing the story of a man who rebels against a life serving this tradition, instead becoming an English professor in Canada. In structure, there are parallels between this novel and Vassanji's "The In-Between World of Vikram Lall" (which I loved): both consist largely of a character looking back on his life, but, almost as a surprise to the reader, an important part of each character's life occurs after the period of reflection.

Shilpa sat with Bapu-ji in the pavilion; she had a copy of the Gita in her hand, from which she read to him from time to time, and he interpreted. It was late afternoon. It was late afternoon t with them for a while, then left. Soon after, Shilpa stood up from her chair, went to stand behind my father, and tenderly, lovingly massaged his head, her long fingers grasping, caressing the crown, rubbing his scalp end to end, side to side. Her face was flushed from the heat, her parrot-green sari clung to her long, willowy body. Her thick long braid fell in front of her.

The Assassin’s Song, by . Vassanji is the author of four acclaimed novels: The Gunny Sack, which won a regional Commonwealth Prize; No New Land; The Book of Secrets, which won the very first Giller Prize; and Amriika

The Assassin’s Song, by . Читать весь отзыв. Vassanji is the author of four acclaimed novels: The Gunny Sack, which won a regional Commonwealth Prize; No New Land; The Book of Secrets, which won the very first Giller Prize; and Amriika. He lives in Toronto with his wife and two sons. Библиографические данные.

Аудиокнига "The Assassin's Song", . Читает Firdous Bamji. The Assassin's Song is the story of Karsan Dargawalla, who leaves India for a new life before attempting to come to terms with his heritage-and the father he left behind

Аудиокнига "The Assassin's Song", . Мгновенный доступ к вашим любимым книгам без обязательной ежемесячной платы. Слушайте книги через Интернет и в офлайн-режиме на устройствах Android, iOS, Chromecast, а также с помощью Google Ассистента. The Assassin's Song is the story of Karsan Dargawalla, who leaves India for a new life before attempting to come to terms with his heritage-and the father he left behind. A deeply affecting story, full of contemplation and mystery. At once lush and precise.

Unfortunately we all bear this burden at some point in our lives. The extent differs, but the burden is there nonetheless.

M.G. Vassanji’s magnificent new novel provides further proof of his unique, wide ranging and profound genius. The Assassin’s Songis a shining study of the conflict between ancient loyalties and modern desires, a conflict that creates turmoil the world over – and it is at once an intimate portrait of one man’s painful struggle to hold the earthly and the spiritual in balance.In The Assassin’s Song,Karsan Dargawalla tells the story of the medieval Sufi shrine of Pirbaag, and his betrayal of its legacy. But Karsan’s conflicted attempt to settle accounts quickly blossoms into a layered tale that spans centuries: from the mysterious Nur Fazal’s spiritual journeys through thirteenth century India, to his shrine’s eventual destruction in the horrifying "riots" of 2002.From the age of eleven, Karsan has been told that one day he will succeed his father as guardian of the Shrine of the Wanderer: as the highest spiritual authority in their region, he will be God’s representative to the multitudes who come to the shrine for penance and worship. But Karsan’s longings are simpler: to play cricket with his friends, to discover more of the exciting world he reads about in the newspapers his friend Raja Singh, a truck driver, brings him from all over India.Half on a whim, Karsan applies to study at Harvard, but when he is unexpectedly offered a scholarship there he must try to meld his family’s wishes with his own yearnings. Two years immersed in the intellectual and sexual ferment of America splits him further, until finally Karsan abdicates his successorship to the eight hundred-year-old throne.But even as Karsan succeeds in his "ordinary" life – marrying and having a son, becoming a professor in suburban British Columbia – his heritage haunts him in unexpected ways. And after tragedy strikes, both in Canada and Pirbaag, he is drawn back across thirty years of silence and separation to discover what, if anything, is left for him in India.Both sweeping and intimate, The Assassin’s Song is a great novel in the grandest sense: a book that captures the intricate complexities of the individual conscience even as it grippingly portrays entire civilizations in tumult.

Comments: (4)

Barinirm
Imagine your life being planned for you without considering your feelings. Imagine being denied the opportunity to explore your talents because they conflict with this plan. Unfortunately we all bear this burden at some point in our lives. The extent differs, but the burden is there nonetheless.

The Assassin's Song is narrated through Karsan Dargawalla who is heir to the 700-year-old shrine of a 13th century Sufi Nur Fazal. The shrine is in Gujarat, India. It is expected that Karsan, like his father and his ancestors before him, will be keeper of the shrine dispensing blessings and wisdom to all those who visit, regardless of their race, caste or religion. Karsan has an opportunity to move away from the restricted life at the shrine and explores the world outside. Later, he returns to the shrine to become its next Saheb (the role his father played before him, and the role he rebelled against).

The book begins with Karsan at the shrine after his parents are dead, the shrine is destroyed, and his brother has become a militant Muslim and is wanted by the authorities for some unknown crime. Karsan says, "I, the last lord of the shrine of Pirbaag, must pick up the pieces of my trust and tell its story... ." Thus the book begins at the end and through flashbacks it pieces together the life of Karsan Dargawalla as he sees it. Interspersed are chapters that tell the tale of Nur Fazal (also known as the Wonderer). Could it be to show the imperfect symmetry between the lives of Nur Fazal and Karsan?

The narrative is not poetic but contains simple truths. Karsan's teleological question is "Do we always end up where we belong?" As are questions of duty, faith, and self-awareness. It seems that there isn't one resounding truth, but a plethora of small complexities that envelope the characters - with all their contradictions. This book requires patience, empathy, and curiosity. The glossary does not offer a complete list of Indian words used through the text. The story is slow to start, but picks up about halfway through.

The book explores the conflict between ancient loyalties and modern desires through Karsan Dargawalla's painful struggle to maintain a fine balance between the earthly and the ethereal.

Armchair Interview says: The story is about cultural balance.
thrust
This novel is a prime example of how the most specific of stories can have the most universal meaning. Vassanji brings to life a small piece of India -- a shrine to a Sufi mystic -- and the experience of a boy who grows to manhood full of doubts about his father's beliefs and his longing to see the world. What son has not gone through this with his father? The relationship between Karsan and his brother also resonates deeply with men who have younger brothers -- and the tensions that arise when they follow different paths, even as the eternal bonds of brotherhood bring them together.

These universal struggles -- father and son, brother and brother -- are set against the fascinating backdrop of Indian nationalism, the deadly Hindu-Moslem conflict and the story of a medieval Sufi mystic whose life and teaching are shrouded in tragedy. All the while, we're aware that the Sufism as practiced by the father -- the Avatar -- sets the family apart, and Karsan feels the apartness no matter where he goes, either to a Christian school in India, to Harvard, to Canada or back to India. Are all these differences really just illusion, and if so, why do people persist in preserving them? Vassanji does a wonderful job of putting the reader inside Karsan's life thanks to effective description, a gripping plot and wonderfully drawn, tragic characters, from Karsan's movie-going mom to the truck driver who opens Karsan's world to the MIT student with whom Karsan falls in love.
Nikobar
In this novel Vassanji attempts to convey an appreciation of the holy man tradition in India, while writing the story of a man who rebels against a life serving this tradition, instead becoming an English professor in Canada. In structure, there are parallels between this novel and Vassanji's "The In-Between World of Vikram Lall" (which I loved): both consist largely of a character looking back on his life, but, almost as a surprise to the reader, an important part of each character's life occurs after the period of reflection. Historical events play a role in both novels; here it is the ethnic massacres which are also a part of the Indian tradition, euphemistically referred to as riots. Surprisingly to me, some occurred long after Indian independence, without state authorities acting to suppress them.

This is a successful, ambitious novel, but not as enthralling as "The In-Between World of Vikram Lall". Having said this, it is easier to deal with politics than the spiritual, and Vassanji does succeed in making Karsan's final life choice credible. He also makes the breakup of the marriage credible, but I would like to have heard from his wife, as a married woman, more; as a minor criticism, why didn't they double park to get their boy's drug since both were in the car, instead of spending so much time looking for a parking place? Karsan's childhood friends are not developed even as minor characters. Conversely, Karsan's coming of age during his Harvard years is done beautifully and is the best part of this novel.
Zargelynd
What a wonderful book . I like the most is how real time events are interwoven in the book. Once you star reading it is hard to stop till end .
The Assassin's Song download epub
World Literature
Author: M.G. Vassanji
ISBN: 038566351X
Category: Literature & Fiction
Subcategory: World Literature
Language: English
Publisher: Doubleday Canada; First Edition edition (August 21, 2007)
Pages: 336 pages