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The World Health Report 2004: HIV/AIDS: Changing History (Public Health) download epub

by World Health Organization


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Until now, treatment has been the most neglected element in most developing countries: almost 6 million people in these countries will die in the near future if they do not receive treat-ment – but only about 400 000 of them were receiving it in 2003.

The World Health Report 2010 focused on the topic of universal health . 2004: Changing history. The World health report 2003 examined the global health situation and some of the major threats to health.

The World Health Report 2010 focused on the topic of universal health care coverage, and how countries can modify their financing systems to move towards this goal 2008: Primary health care. AIDS Clinic, McLeod Ganj, Himachal Pradesh, India.

The world health report 2004 - changing historyWorld Health Organization . World Heritage Encyclopedia is a registered trademark of the World Public Library Association, a non-profit organization.

The world health report 2004 - changing historyWorld Health Organization: ^ The world health report 2000 - Health systems: improving performance. Official World Health Organization page on the World Health Report. World Health Organization.

The World Health Organization (WHO) is a specialized agency of the United Nations that is concerned with international public health. It was established on 7 April 1948, and is headquartered in Geneva, Switzerland

The World Health Organization (WHO) is a specialized agency of the United Nations that is concerned with international public health. It was established on 7 April 1948, and is headquartered in Geneva, Switzerland. The WHO is a member of the United Nations Development Group. Its predecessor, the Health Organization, was an agency of the League of Nations.

Effectively tackling HIV/AIDS is the world's most urgent public health challenge. Unknown a quarter of a century ago, the disease is now the world's leading cause of death. Today an estimated 40 million people are living with HIV/AIDS, and in 2003 three million people died and five million others became infected. At present, almost six million people in developing countries need treatment, but only about 400 000 of them received it in 2003

By using HIV treatment programmes to bolster existing prevention efforts and improve overall health systems in the .

By using HIV treatment programmes to bolster existing prevention efforts and improve overall health systems in the developing world, the international community has a unique opportunity to change the course of history, says The worM health report 2004-changing history, launched by WHO in Geneva on 11 May. AIDS-related illnesses ate the leading cause of death among people between 15 and 59 years of age, with 34 and 46 million HIV-positive people worldwide and 5 million new infections every year, says the 170-page report.

The world health report 2004 - changing history. This year's report examines the global health situation and some of the major threats to health in today's world

Explore the history and development of the global HIV/AIDS epidemic .

Explore the history and development of the global HIV/AIDS epidemic, where it began, and how it spread. Beginning in the early 1980s, new and unusual diagnostic patterns began to emerge in different parts of the world. A benign, fairly harmless cancer called Kaposi's Sarcoma, common among the elderly, started appearing as a virulent strain in younger patients.

In November, the World Health Organization (WHO) held its first meeting to assess the global AIDS situation . The groundwork was laid for a nationwide HIV and AIDS care system in the USA that was later funded by the Ryan White CARE Ac. 3.

In November, the World Health Organization (WHO) held its first meeting to assess the global AIDS situation and began international surveillance. By the end of the year the number of AIDS cases in the USA had risen to 3,064 - of this number, 1,292 had died.

The World Health Report 2004 - Changing History argues that a comprehensive HIV/AIDS strategy linking prevention, treatment, care, and support for people living with the virus could save the lives of millions of people in poor and middle-income countries. Effectively tackling HIV/AIDS is the world's most urgent public health challenge. Unknown a quarter of a century ago, the disease is now the world's leading cause of death. Today an estimated 40 million people are living with HIV/AIDS, and in 2003 three million people died and five million others became infected. At present, almost six million people in developing countries need treatment, but only about 400 000 of them received it in 2003. The World Health Report 2004 argues that a treatment gap of such dimensions is indefensible and that narrowing it is both an ethical obligation and a public health necessity. In September 2003 WHO, UNAIDS, and the Global Fund to Fight AIDS, Tuberculosis, and Malaria declared lack of access to AIDS treatment with antiretroviral medicines a global health emergency. In response, these organizations and their partners launched an effort to provide 3 million people in developing countries with antiretroviral therapy (ART) by end 2005 - the 3 by 5 initiative. Today the global community is now mobilized and more resources than ever are being channeled into an emergency response. This World Health Report shows how a partnership linking international organizations, national governments, the private sector, and communities is working simultaneously to expand access to HIV/AIDS treatment, reinforce HIV prevention, and strengthen health systems in some of the countries where they are currently weakest. It is a task that requires overcoming major obstacles. However, determination to surmount these obstacles is spurred by the knowledge that rapid expansion of ART can avert millions of needless deaths.
The World Health Report 2004: HIV/AIDS: Changing History (Public Health) download epub
Administration & Medicine Economics
Author: World Health Organization
ISBN: 924156265X
Category: Medical Books
Subcategory: Administration & Medicine Economics
Language: English
Publisher: World Health Organization; 2004 ed. edition (May 1, 2004)
Pages: 200 pages