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Points to Consider: Responses to HIV/AIDS in Africa, Asia, and the Caribbean download epub

by David Gisselquist


Epub Book: 1404 kb. | Fb2 Book: 1790 kb.

Request PDF On Aug 1, 2009, J S St Lawrence and others published Points to consider: responses to HIV/AIDS . One in four children in Africa go out to work, it says.

One in four children in Africa go out to work, it says. Around 12. million children in Asia are economically active, 4. million in sub-Saharan Africa, . million in Latin America and the Caribbean, and 1. million in other regions. total number of children involved in all forms of labour, however, is falling.

With Points to Consider, Gisselquist puts the whole puzzle together. Why is WHO concerned primarily with sexual transmission of HIV (which occurs about in less than 1 sexual encounter per 1000) when tainted medical devices have about a 90% transmission rate? He makes an excellent case for how this is happening and why differences in sexual mixing patterns are not enough to explain the differences in HIV infection rates. The book points out an important anomaly in the current paradigm about how HIV is spreading in Africa.

Points to Consider book. David Gisselquist has published more than a dozen articles in medical journals on HIV epidemics in Africa and India, with special attention to risks to transmit HIV through health care.

Comparative effectiveness of HIV test- ing and treatment in highly endemic regions. Arch Int Med 2010;170:1357-54. 40. Shelton JD, Johnston B. Condom gap in Africa: evidence from donor agencies and key informants. Br Med J 2001;323:139. 41. Krieger JN, Bailey RC, Opeya J, et al.

We aim to show you accurate product information. Manufacturers, suppliers and others provide what you see here, and we have not verified it. See our disclaimer. Books : Points to Consider: Responses to HIV/AIDS in Africa, Asia, and the Caribbean (Hardcover). Adonis & Abbey Publishers.

Points to Consider: Responses to HIV/AIDS. in Africa, Asia, and the Caribbean. Steve Minkin and Lucy Hancock encouraged me from 1999, when I began to look for information on blood exposures as risks for HIV infection. Gisselquist D. Points to Consider: Response to HIV/AIDS in Africa, Asia, and the Caribbean, 2nd ed.

Despite all the money and attention directed at HIV/AIDS in the past several decades, these risks have remained.

Since the early 20th century, when HIV began to circulate among humans, blood exposures during healthcare have contributed to the transmission of the virus.

Explore this page to find out more about groups most affected by HIV in South Africa, HIV testing and counselling programmes, HIV prevention programmes, antiretroviral treatment availability, civil society’s role, HIV and TB in South Africa, funding for HIV, and the way forward for South Africa. South Africa has the biggest and most high-profile HIV epidemic in the world, with an estimated . million people living with HIV in 2018.

Points to Consider: Responses to HIV/AIDS in Africa, Asia, and the Caribbean. 31 – Local Responses Readings Due 1. Allen, Tim and Susette Heald. London: Adonis & Abbey. HIV/AIDS Policy in Africa: What Has Worked in Uganda and What Has Failed in Botswana? Journal of International Development 16: 1141–1154.

HIV/AIDS is a major public health concern and cause of death in many parts of Africa

HIV/AIDS is a major public health concern and cause of death in many parts of Africa. Although the continent is home to about 1. percent of the world's population, more than two-thirds of the total infected worldwide – some 35 million people – were Africans, of whom 15 million have already died.

Since the early 20th century, when HIV began to circulate among humans, blood exposures during healthcare have contributed to the transmission of the virus. Despite all the money and attention directed at HIV/AIDS in the past several decades, these risks have remained. The book asks why, and seeks answers to a number of crucial questions: How much of the worst HIV epidemics are from blood exposures? Why have these risks persisted? And what is to be done? Points To Consider looks to the future and recommends new strategies that people and governments can adopt to ensure that healthcare and cosmetic services do not transmit HIV, and to reliably stop the worst HIV/AIDS epidemics. _______________________________ David Gisselquist has published more than a dozen articles in medical journals on HIV epidemics in Africa and India, with special attention to risks to transmit HIV through health care. He has traveled and worked in Africa and Asia, and has assisted field research on HIV in India and Kenya. He co-edited a collection of country studies on injection practices (Pilot-Testing the WHO Tools to Assess and Evaluate Injection Practices, published by WHO, 2003), and has spoken at WHO and at international AIDS conferences. Dr Gisselquist holds a PhD in economics, with experience in anthropology and rural development. He is an independent consultant

Comments: (3)

Olwado
As someone interested in the AIDS pandemic in Africa, I am familiar with several of the publications by Gisselquist and his colleagues. With an article here and there calling to look at the rates of HIV infection from medical care (unsterile instruments and needles) it is hard to put the whole puzzle together. With Points to Consider, Gisselquist puts the whole puzzle together. Why is WHO concerned primarily with sexual transmission of HIV (which occurs about in less than 1 sexual encounter per 1000) when tainted medical devices have about a 90% transmission rate?

He makes an excellent case for how this is happening and why differences in sexual mixing patterns are not enough to explain the differences in HIV infection rates. The book points out an important anomaly in the current paradigm about how HIV is spreading in Africa. By ignoring nosocomial infections, WHO is allowing the pandemic to spread. The answer is simple: once use needles and syringes and clean sterile medical instruments.
Brakora
As someone previously uninformed in this area with no scientific background, I was pleasantly surprised to find this book well written, easy to read, and highly persuasive. There is no dearth of scientific rigor in the book, but the footnotes are discreetly placed at the end of the chapters, and the references in the body of the work do not intrude on the narrative, allowing the author to make his case quickly and confidently. Dr. Gisselquist lays bare the western ethnocentrism at the heart of international health community's early collective misreading of the causes of the HIV AIDs crisis in Africa, and more importantly, the medical practices necessary now to address it. This book should be required reading for all policy makers and NGOs invovled in international health policy and planning.
Maveri
It is extremely sad to keep in mind the 40 million sick or dead from HIV that might have been avoided if public health measures had been taken.
Gisselquist brings together a lot of data, and Points to Consider is a must for the concerned person.
Today HIV epidemic continue via dirty needles unchecked. Last year, in 2007, 100 children were found contaminated with HIV as the Kyrgyzstan investigated, and 133 in 2006 in Kazakhstan: re-use of needles without sterilization, contaminated multidose vials, low paid medical staff, lack of supplies- all responsible for death of the children. Official litterature and dogma prevent investigations in Africa.. It's more convenient to blame HIV on promiscuous sex.. Garance at safeobserver.org
Points to Consider: Responses to HIV/AIDS in Africa, Asia, and the Caribbean download epub
Medicine
Author: David Gisselquist
ISBN: 1905068263
Category: Medical Books
Subcategory: Medicine
Language: English
Publisher: Adonis & Abbey Publishers Ltd (March 20, 2008)
Pages: 236 pages