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The Birth Book: Everything You Need to Know to Have a Safe and Satisfying Birth download epub

by William Sears


Epub Book: 1474 kb. | Fb2 Book: 1790 kb.

The book is broken up into 3 sections: Preparing for birth, Easing pain in labor, and Experiencing birth.

The book is broken up into 3 sections: Preparing for birth, Easing pain in labor, and Experiencing birth. I've long known that lying on your back is a stupid and ill-advised position in which to give birth (umm, hi gravity?), so I love that this book gives illustrations of some great positions that can be switched up to make mom more comfortable. I also enjoy the diagrams of exactly how the baby comes out of the birth canal.

This book covers nearly everything you need to know beginning with pregnancy through to the big day.

He definitely carries the freak flag for natural childbirth and that may turn some people off, however he provides lots of good information on when drugs and cesareans are probably a good idea.

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Sears, William, . ; Sears, Martha. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books. Uploaded by sf-loadersive. org on February 24, 2010.

Other books, like The Birth Book by William Sears, . and Martha Sears, . This book’s cover is creased, and a few pages are dog-eared, but I don’t mind

Other books, like The Birth Book by William Sears, . Though oral storytelling has been valuable to me as a pregnant woman, so have these books. This book’s cover is creased, and a few pages are dog-eared, but I don’t mind. Part of my enjoyment in reading it is seeing which pages Laura marked: what questions to ask your doctor; an explanation of Kegel exercises; how to negotiate maternity leave; and the section on birth defect tests.

Skeleton for our birth plan. We're committed to providing low prices every day, on everything. Not afraid of birth, trusting my body. bookscentlover, October 24, 2012.

Title: The Birth Book: Everything You Need to Know to Have A Safe and Satisfying Birth By: William Sears, Martha Sears Format: Paperback Number of Pages: 280 Vendor: Hachette Book Group, USA Publication Date: 1994. Dimensions: . 5 X . 0 X 1 (inches) Weight: 14 ounces ISBN: 0316779075 ISBN-13: 9780316779074 Stock No: WW79075X. Prepare for a safe and joyful birth-with the help of America's foremost baby and childcare experts Since women enjoy more birthing options today than ever before, the path toward a safe and satisfying birth can be fraught with important decisions.

Prepare for a safe and joyful birth-with the help of America's foremost baby and childcare experts Since women enjoy more birthing options today than ever before, the path toward a safe and satisfying birth can be fraught with important decisions

Prepare for a safe and joyful birth-with the help of America's foremost baby and childcare experts Since women enjoy more birthing options today than ever before, the path toward a safe and satisfying birth can be fraught with important decisions.

The books that the crew-yes, including Joey-choose have a lot of significance, once you start digging. Though there are several titles, the one we can see clearly is The Birth Book. Some serve as a subtle insight into the character's mindset at the time (see: the irony of Ross reading The Idiot). It’s fitting that he’s most involved in a book co-written by two people, because it reminds us that Susan and Carol will be raising the baby as co-parents, and Ross is the third wheel. Season 1, Episode 24: The One Where Rachel Finds Out. Oh, The Places You’ll Go!

Gives expectant parents an overview of the options available, offering up-to-the-minute advice on such matters as physical and emotional preparation, the father's role, avoiding a cesarean birth, and other information

Comments: (7)

Conjuril
UPDATE: 24 days after I wrote this review, I had a healthy 7 pound, 9 ounce baby boy via VBAC with my husband, doula, and midwives by my side at a respected local hospital. I credit this book along with several others for informing me about healthy options that could help me have the birth I wanted, and how to adapt when things weren't going my way. We did it!!

I checked this book out of my local library along with about a dozen others, and it was one of a few that I chose to purchase for myself after reading it so I could make notes and highlight my own favorite parts.

The book first tells of Dr. Sears' wife and co-author, Martha, and her birth experiences beginning in (I believe) the 50s. If you know anything about the history of childbirth, her experiences aren't really out of the norm for each year that she describes. The book then clearly lays out its goals and what it will discuss. This is where I get confused at negative reviews that contend that the book is pushy or too preachy about home or birth center births. Within the first chapter, the book immediately begins to handle sensitive readers with kid gloves, reiterating time and time again that some women need medical interventions, and that every woman should make choices that are best for herself, her baby, her family, and her individual situation. I don't know how much more the author could coddle a fragile reader who doesn't want to hear that her expectation of an epidural at first contraction could lead to more medical procedures. I've come to think that women who are touchy and overly sensitive about books that suggest a natural birth are ones who are insecure about their own experiences or decisions, and perhaps the ones to hear this information the most. A healthy woman with a healthy pregnancy and baby are likely to have little need for medical interventions. That's not Dr. Sears' (or any author's) opinion, friends.

The book is broken up into 3 sections: Preparing for birth, Easing pain in labor, and Experiencing birth. My personal favorite chapters have been VBAC and Best Birthing Positions. I've long known that lying on your back is a stupid and ill-advised position in which to give birth (umm, hi gravity?), so I love that this book gives illustrations of some great positions that can be switched up to make mom more comfortable. I also enjoy the diagrams of exactly how the [average] baby comes out of the birth canal. The ways in which a fetus turns to make his or her grand entrance into the world are really remarkable!

I will agree with the obvious fact that some of the research presented in the book is "old", as it was written in 1994. I would love to see a revised edition that just changes those few things - however I wouldn't expect a totally different book. Guess why? Because women have been having babies for THOUSANDS OF YEARS. The way we deal with childbirth has changed through the decades, but y'all, for gosh sakes, your body does the same basic functions as a woman's body did in 1750! And we have the luxury now of avoiding polio and rickets and other scary diseases that can wreak havoc on a childbearing body. We are so lucky to know so much about our bodies and how they perform - the function of birthing a child hasn't changed since 1994.

After an emergency C-section two years before, I was anxious to study up on birth (I had done NO research, reading, or classes for my first) to see if I could have a better birth experience this time. As I suspected, there were choices that I made in my care that really set me on a path to the outcome that I got, and this time I am making different plans so that I can have a better birth experience. Personally I'm just not the "home birth" type, so I am going to the hospital for my birth; since I am a previous recent cesarean patient, home birth is not really the safest option for me anyway. This book has really helped me grasp what I'm going to go through and instead of just being a patient at a hospital, I can go into the birth experience knowing each stage, what my body is trying to do, and how I can feel like I am a part of the experience - understanding options and making my own choices instead of just lying on a hospital bed, waiting for my baby to pop out.

If you are a woman who wants to go to a hospital at 9 am on the day of your choice, receive your pain medication, and have a C-section at the hour of your choosing, then no, this book is not for you. If you are a woman who believes that your doctor knows all and the hospital is the best place for you to give birth and you are going to demand an epidural asap and lie on your back to give birth, then no, this book is not for you. And if you're expecting an internationally-renowned, respected, educated, reputable, experienced doctor to tell you that these are the best choices for a woman's body, you're probably going to have to look REALLY hard.
But if you're looking for a book that will present you with your options, give examples, talk about the specific ways in which your body is working during labor and ways you can help, not hinder, it from doing its job, if you had a negative birth experience in the past and you're wondering if there was anything you could have changed or anything you could have researched or read about beforehand, then this book IS for you.
Zepavitta
This very easy-to-read book provides well-researched information to pregnant women and their birth partners. After reading this book, I was informed about all my options, though the authors lean more toward less-medicated or unmedicated births. This book, unlike some, is not condescending and gives the reader the historical influences and the research behind the information presented. I used the techniques in this book during my (completely unmedicated) labor. Yes, labor is, well, labor, but it is also the most empowering, amazing, beautiful experience you might ever have in your life. I cannot recommend this book highly enough.
Anazan
I'm in my 3rd trimester, just two weeks away from the due date, so, while I can't give an after-the-birth review, this book has been very helpful in getting me feeling prepared for labor.

My husband and I are very high-tech people, but I skew a bit "crunchy" or hippie when it comes to medicine, just because I've seen in my own experience with a food allergy that Western medicine is amazing, but crazy interventions are not always necessary and modern doctors are trained to think they are. So, from family recommendations, my husband and I took a Bradley Method birth class, and I was very pleased with the outlook and overview; basically, that the female body was made to be able to successfully give birth, and medical interventions should be a much rarer thing than they are in most Western birth experiences.
However, while the Bradley class was very helpful, I looked for additional books to help me get prepared and, almost more importantly, *feel* prepared, because as most natural childbirths promoters mention, tension and fear only increase pain. This book has been the most helpful read so far. It has practical advice, lots of different options, and useful birth stories with comments at the end to give different scenarios.

If you're interested in natural childbirth, or if you're just wanting a reasonable introduction to why natural childbirth could be a good option for you, this is an excellent resource.
Oparae
A friend recommended this book to me and I'm so glad I used it as a reference guide. I originally wanted an unmedicated delivery, but had such a difficult pregnancy that I decided I'd suffered enough and would enjoy the benefits of an epidural. However, I had heard horror stories of women whose epidural didn't take or who didn't get to the hospital in time and I wanted to be prepared just in case. Between this book and the childbirth class at the hospital, I was given all the tools I needed to make it through labor and delivery very smoothly and calmly. I was pre-eclamptic, so needed to be induced but was able to go into real labor without the use of pitocin. I experienced 19 hours of mild labor, four hours of hard labor, and 20 minutes of pushing. I didn't receive the epidural in time for it to take effect because the nurse was caught off-guard by how quickly I progressed at the end. I am incredibly grateful that I had read Dr. Sears' book regarding labor. It changed my attitude from fear of excrutiating pain to a calm acceptance of the mild discomfort of most of labor. I was able to relax and focus and now have fairly pleasant memories of my experience. I also felt empowered to make my wishes known to the doctor and hospital staff, stand up for myself when I was uncomfortable, and get what I wanted from the experience. I'm strangely thankful the epidural didn't take full effect. It was a beautiful experience and I largely credit the information in this book with that result. I feel like my life in general will be better now because of the relaxation techniques and attitude adjustments I learned through reading and applying it.
The Birth Book: Everything You Need to Know to Have a Safe and Satisfying Birth download epub
Medicine
Author: William Sears
ISBN: 0316779083
Category: Medical Books
Subcategory: Medicine
Language: English
Publisher: Little Brown & Co; 1st edition (February 1, 1994)
Pages: 269 pages