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The daffodil affair download epub

by Michael Innes


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The Daffodil Affair book. As Michael Innes, he published numerous mystery novels and short story collections, most featuring the Scotland Yard detective John Appleby. Other books in the series

The Daffodil Affair book. Other books in the series. Sir John Appleby (1 - 10 of 36 books). Books by Michael Innes.

The Daffodil Affair (The Inspector Appleby Mysteries Book 7) and . This is the first book I have read by the prolific Michael Innes, the pseudonym for an Oxford professor who wrote many, more learned works under his own name. This will certainly not be the last Innes book I read

This is the first book I have read by the prolific Michael Innes, the pseudonym for an Oxford professor who wrote many, more learned works under his own name. This will certainly not be the last Innes book I read. Published in 1942, while the author appears to have been teaching in Australia, this is one of the most peculiar mysteries I have read-if, indeed, you want to call it a mystery at all.

The river widened, but was filled with treacherous shoals; they kept now to mid-channel, and sometimes there was a water horizon on either bow.

Michael Innes naked and lean – and once so many canoes that Mr Wine had a case of rifles brought on deck. But it was an uneventful voyage.

The Daffodil Affair was first published in 1942. I want very much to like Michael Innes books, but I get stuck in his long sentences. His writing is dense, something I need quiet and time to navigate. Light after light goes out, including two luminaries from Scotland Yard. In the midst of the Blitz, a house in Bloomsbury disappears. I’ve never read this one, but I think I’ll give it a try.

by. Innes, Michael, 1906-1994. New York : Penguin Books. inlibrary; printdisabled; ; americana.

Inspector Appleby's aunt is most distressed when her horse, Daffodil - a somewhat half-witted animal with exceptional numerical skills - goes missing from her stable in Harrogate. Meanwhile, Hudspith is hot on the trail of Lucy Rideout, an enigmatic young girl has been whisked away to an unknown isle by a mysterious gentleman.

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The Daffodil Affair isn’t a typical detective novel either

The Daffodil Affair isn’t a typical detective novel either. Published two years after The Secret Vanguard, in 1942, the war is an influence on this novel too, but I won’t say much more about that as I would be risking giving away too much of the plot. In The Daffodil Affair, Appleby and his colleague Hudspith are investigating three separate mysteries, none of which are the sort of thing you would expect two Scotland Yard detectives to become involved in. First, there is the theft of Daffodil, an extraordinary horse who seems able to count and to read minds.

Other readers will always be interested in your opinion of the books you've read.

Other readers will always be interested in your opinion of the books you've read. Whether you've loved the book or not, if you give your honest and detailed thoughts then people will find new books that are right for them.


Comments: (6)

Gavirus
This is the first book I have read by the prolific Michael Innes, the pseudonym for an Oxford professor who wrote many, more learned works under his own name. This will certainly not be the last Innes book I read.

Published in 1942, while the author appears to have been teaching in Australia, this is one of the most peculiar mysteries I have read--if, indeed, you want to call it a mystery at all. The three occurrences at the story's beginning are the theft of an apparently half-witted, worthless draught horse, the disappearance of an apparently (there is a pattern here) half-witted girl, and the disappearance of an entire house, noted for its history of hauntings, from a London Square.

Inspector Appleby is placed on the horse case to humor his superior's well-connected sister, Lady Caroline, whose favorite draught horse Daffodil (the horse's name) was. No sooner is Appleby on his way to the scene of the crime in Harrogate than a chance occurrence convinces him that the case is more complicated than it appears--and that a witch is involved! Meanwhile, Appleby's colleague Hudspith is on the trail of the missing girl. Of course, that ends up being connected, too, and before you know it they are on a boat for South America with a curious group of fellow passengers.

I won't describe more of the plot, which turns largely from mystery to suspense by the final section of the book. What I will touch upon is what makes this book so interesting and so much fun--at least for this reader--a survey of internet opinion turns up a wide variety of reactions. If you're looking for a straightforward mystery of that period, you're out of luck. This book stands alone. It is a tongue-in-cheek, farcical, occasionally laugh-out-loud, but also, in its way, very serious work of wartime thinking. Innes posits a post-war world increasingly ruled by a manipulative madman who uses magic and superstition to entrance his followers. The parallels to our current post-Trump, post-Truth world are uncanny.

One can assume, this being a series, that Appleby (and Hudspith) will win out. The fun is watching how they manage it. This includes receiving help from some unexpected sources, who are much deeper thinkers than you would expect, beginning with Appleby's Aunt, who also resides in Harrogate and is a good friend of Lady Caroline. In unravelling the motivations for the three events that initiate the story, Appleby immerses himself in various literature about hauntings and the supernatural, including some old documents, which the author quotes. These are actual cases you can look up for yourself if you wish. The way Innes weaves them into the story is very effective.

It is a fascinating, highly unusual, and very satisfying read. The ending is in keeping with the droll aspects that infuse the narrative. Just go into this with an open mind, no expectations, and--if you can--without reading any plot spoilers on the book's cover or in reviews. This is escape literature at its finest, because, at its heart, it makes a serious point.
Musical Aura Island
Whilst I really enjoy reading Michael Innes stories, they do require some getting into, unfortunately this one did not meet the mark. It was as if he wasn't sure where the story was going himself, and I felt I was in a "boys own" adventure book. It is quite typical of the era but a little too far fetch adventure for my taste, although as always well written and interesting in it own way
Wyameluna
Michael Innes plunged off the surreal deep end when he wrote "The Daffodil Affair." Maybe it was because of the war--this Inspector Appleby mystery was published in 1942--or maybe Innes just felt like seeing how far he could venture into the weird and still get published. All of his mysteries contain eccentricities: usually a farcical character or a setting that is just out of true. In this particular mystery, characters, plot, and setting are all seen through a glass, cross-eyed.

However, if you can swallow the premise that an obscenely wealthy individual is stealing paranormal objects (including a counting horse, a witch, and a haunted house) with the goal of cornering the market on the supernatural, then founding a new religion and ruling the world after the current dust-up (WWII) is ended, you'll enjoy this story. It has a Grand Guignol climax on the banks of the mighty Amazon River, that includes not only the cab horse, the witch, and the haunted house, but also the phosphorescing ghost of a murdered man.

It also has the strangest motive for murder in all of fiction.

Inspector Appleby is drawn into the Daffodil affair when a cab horse of that name goes missing in wartime London. Daffodil happens to be the favorite 'ride' of Appleby's elderly maiden aunt. Not only is he a gentle, slow-moving steed, he can also answer numerical queries by bobbing his head the requisite number of times, in the manner of the psychic horse, Clever Hans (although Clever Hans used his hoof not his head).

Meanwhile, another Scotland Yard detective named Hudspith is hard at work on the abduction of Lucy Rideout, a young woman with a multiple-personality disorder. He and Appleby converge on the scent when a haunted house in Bloomsbury goes missing.

The detectives follow the trail of the paranormal captives onto a ship bound for South America, posing as psychic Australian sheep ranchers in order to bamboozle the wealthy collector into abducting them, too. Appleby spends his time at sea philosophizing about the gullibility of mankind and persuading his partner Hudspith to fake supernatural visions.

Innes's C.I.D. inspector is more intellectually morose than usual (remember that the author wrote this story in the midst of the war), but his antic streak also emerges, especially when he is persuading the gullible Hudspith to act out yet another phantasmagoric visitation.

"The Daffodil Affair" is vintage Appleby, in spite of its preposterous plot. It shouldn't be the first Innes mystery you read (try "Hamlet, Revenge!" or "One Man Show"), but once you're hooked you won't be able to stop yourself from enjoying it--supernatural fizz, metaphysical speculations, counting horses, and all.
Malak
This book gave me a blend of Agatha Christie and Sherlock Holmes vibes. It took me such a long time to get the writing flow because the characters were as dynamic as they came and once I got the pace and the humor it became an enjoyable read.
I'd recommend it to anyone who loves a good mystery with diverse characters, you'll love this book. Thank you NetGalley for the ARC.
The daffodil affair download epub
Mystery
Author: Michael Innes
ISBN: 0575015292
Category: Mystery, Thriller & Suspense
Subcategory: Mystery
Language: English
Publisher: Gollancz; New impression edition (1972)
Pages: 151 pages