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McNally's Bluff (Sanders, Lawrence) download epub

by Vincent Lardo


Epub Book: 1769 kb. | Fb2 Book: 1463 kb.

Lawrence Sanders (1920–1998) was the New York Times bestselling author of more than forty mystery and suspense novels.

Carnival impresario Matthew Hayes builds a huge maze in the backyard of his newly purchased South Ocean Boulevard mansion, but guests at his first party aren't too happy when his wife Marlena Marvel is found dead at the maze's center. Lawrence Sanders (1920–1998) was the New York Times bestselling author of more than forty mystery and suspense novels. The Anderson Tapes, completed when he was fifty years old, received an Edgar Award from the Mystery Writers of America for best first novel.

Lawrence Sanders McNally’s Bluff An Archy McNally Novel By Vincent Lardo Contents 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12. .The free online library containing 450000+ books. Read books for free from anywhere and from any device.

Lawrence Sanders McNally’s Bluff An Archy McNally Novel By Vincent Lardo Contents 1 2 3 4 5 6 7 8 9 10 11 12 13 14 1. Listen to books in audio format instead of reading.

Lawrence Sanders was born in Brooklyn in New York City. His Archy McNally series was continued by author Vincent Lardo.

1920-03-15)March 15, 1920 Brooklyn, New York, United States. Lawrence Sanders was born in Brooklyn in New York City. After public school he attended Wabash College, where he obtained a Bachelor of Arts degree. He then returned to New York and worked at Macy's Department Store. Lawrence Sanders bibliography.

The final book in the New York Times–bestselling series is a wacky, waggish whodunit, as the Palm Beach PI investigates a dead end in a maze (Publishers . Lawrence Sanders,Vincent Lardo.

The final book in the New York Times–bestselling series is a wacky, waggish whodunit, as the Palm Beach PI investigates a dead end in a maze (Publishers Weekly). The night Palm Beach society has been eagerly awaiting has finally arrived. Matthew Hayes, once the human cannonball in a traveling carnival and now a retired millionaire, is unveiling his Amazin’ Maze, styled after the historic hedge maze at England’s Hampton Court Palace. But even this wonder is upstaged by Hayes’s wife-when she’s found dead in the center of the labyrinth.

Lawrence Sanders, Vincent Lardo.

Lawrence Sanders, Vincent Lardo he marina is a celebration of the winners in the laissez-faire sweepstakes. They who come out with less don’t think it’s fair, but a pox on the spoilsports. And what could be more picturesque, exciting and exulting, than a marina at high noon under a cloudless Miami sky and radiant sun? As they say in these parts, nada, chico, nada.

Archy McNally, a playboy private eye in Palm Beach, Florida:(For the continuation of the McNally series after Sanders’ death, see Vincent Lardo) McNally. Archy McNally, a playboy private eye in Palm Beach, Florida: (For the continuation of the McNally series after Sanders’ death, see Vincent Lardo).

Lawrence Sander seemed to naturally view life through a philosophical perspective; Vincent Lardo seems to look at human machinations through a sociological lens.

a huge crowd of questionable characters. Lawrence Sander seemed to naturally view life through a philosophical perspective; Vincent Lardo seems to look at human machinations through a sociological lens. Each seasoned author etched those leanings, consciously or not, into their thematic content, plot structure, and designs of Archy's motivations, curiosities, and basic drives through life.

Sanders originated the Archy McNally novels, and Sanders' publisher and estate have allowed Lardo to continue the series

Secrets, surprises, and at least one dead body come out of the closet in the Palm Beach . s most twisted case yet. When self-styled impresario and former human cannonball Matthew Hayes rents a luxury villa on Palm Beach's famed South Ocean Boulevard, the locals roll their eyes. Sanders originated the Archy McNally novels, and Sanders' publisher and estate have allowed Lardo to continue the series. This new one involves the death of a woman in a garden-hedge maze in a Palm Beach villa. The dead woman's husband, a self-styled impresario and former human cannonball, hires McNally to find his wife's killer.

In McNally's CHANCE Lardo definitely had Archy down and strutting with the same wit and charm which Sanders conjured in the pilot to this series, McNally's SECRET. I was instantly mesmerized by Lardo's opening detailing of The Character of a famous female romance novelist, Sabrina Wright; her evolving situation held my interest with no lulls allowed. I was still noticing a slight edge of anger to Lardo's Archy (in this 3rd novel from Lardo, 10th in the series) which I hadn't felt with Sanders' version of the man, but the edgy persona continued to work well.

When the wife of a former carnival performer is found murdered at the center of her husband's newly constructed garden maze, Palm Beach private investigator Archy McNally finds the case complicated by the performer's dramatic personality. 125,000 first printing.

Comments: (7)

Ndav
An ethereal quality which I quite enjoyed bled through into parts of this # 6 novel in Vincent Lardo's Archy collection (# 13 in the whole series). In certain luxuriously drawn scenes, I could almost sense light pouring holes through the pages, similarly to images which have been portrayed in movies like the Harry Potter series, and The Never Ending Story. In McNally's BLUFF, Lardo had honed his author skills so well, he seemed to be literally producing magic in how certain scenes lifted off the pages and danced before, around, and within me. One scene in particular, which was infused with this type of "living light," was of the short yacht excursion to which Archy and Georgy were invited by Carolyn Taylor, and which included her boy toy, Billy, and Connie and Alex.

While reading BLUFF I was able to conceptualize another of the core differences I've been sensing (on an edge of unconsciousness) between Sanders and Lardo. Lawrence Sander seemed to naturally view life through a philosophical perspective; Vincent Lardo seems to look at human machinations through a sociological lens. Each seasoned author etched those leanings, consciously or not, into their thematic content, plot structure, and designs of Archy's motivations, curiosities, and basic drives through life. Sanders was automatically focused on the meaning of life itself, and how to get the most out of the experience as an individual. Lardo seems to automatically center on the interconnections among human beings, especially as they're separated socially or politically into clusters, cliques, or classes.

I don't know if these two authors fully realized how they were driven by this type of targeted viewpoint, when they were in process with a plot. Probably few of us do. Yet, I believe we're each driven by unique needs to know, by unique curiosities, which we each possess at core, at the center, the target of our essence-of-being, and of moving forward.

In SECRET, Sanders had Archy state that we're all hedonists at heart, though few of us admit it. In essence, through his McNally series, Sanders uses Archy to dramatize that unique, individual desire to know what gives personal pleasure, what gives a sense of satisfaction, why it does so, and how to enhance that need to "suck the marrow out of life."

In BLUFF, Lardo's Archy seems to imply that we (as human beings) tend to compare ourselves to others at higher levels in social class structure, and that we need to belong, to be accepted within the cream of social strata. Yet, at the same time we've been liberally taught to revile luxury, opulence, privilege and class.

These contrasts bring to mind the thematic essence of Ayn Rand's novels, FOUNTAINHEAD and ATLAS SHRUGGED. Are we naturally oriented, as a species, to self or to others; and which is the prime/ethical way of being.

In myself, I have felt the natural needs of both Archies. I am very much an individual, and have released some of the culturally induced taint of feeling evil in having chosen to allow myself to center in a personal focus. Yet, I also crave to connect with and relate to others, fairly, sometimes intimately in friendship (to mutual benefit), and rightly. I'm wondering if this might be why, along with many others, I've been so fascinated with this series, especially given the comparisons and contrasts of the dual authorship.

In an overall balance I'm more of a philosopher/psychologist, than a sociologist, and I know that's one of the reasons I enjoy the Spenser series. To me, Parker seems more like Sanders than Lardo, in his art, yet, like Lardo, Parker works with (and entertains through) sociological issues, too.

Seeing this perspective contrast between the Sanders and Lardo Archies, the fact begins to clarify for me, of the two personas' varied needs to control (or not) others and their environments. If a person's focus is based comfortably in oneself, there's less or no need to control others. Whereas, if one is based in needs for social interaction, and for acceptance and approval from outside oneself, the need to control becomes natural, sometimes vital for emotional (and physical) survival. Though Ayn Rand does so, I do not want to conclude yet that one or the other type of personality structure is ethically right or wrong, morally good or evil. Maybe the correct fact is that we're each naturally different in these types of slants, and in different phases of maturity. I will admit, though, that the less I feel a need to control, the better I like life and myself.

An angry face of a gorgeous tiger was featured on the book jacket design on the hardcover of McNally's BLUFF (# 13 in this series). At first the symbolism in that design had me puzzled, as I attempted to connect it to the plot. I had wondered why a maze hadn't been used as the graphic symbol... until I contrasted the appealingly brassy red-and-gold colors, and tiger in the bulls-eye on BLUFF's jacket, to the ritzy but somber black-and-gold book jacket on the hardback of McNally's SECRET (the pilot to the series). That cover design comparison gave me a double-bulls-eye "ah ha!" into the slightly different focus of Sanders and Lardo in their offerings in this series.

With McNally's BLUFF, which appears to be the final book in the series, the McNally family's carnival history "secret" is coming full circle...

I didn't want to see that circus circle closing, or stepping fully out of the closet in all its gore and glory. If I saw that too clearly, I might have to accept an underlying significance that # 13 is truly the end of this series. No!

If that is so, however, McNally's BLUFF accomplished that honor of closing this series with amazing grace and literary panache!

In view of this speculation, I needed to read BLUFF on one of my slowest savor speeds. As I did so, I gradually came to love the perfection of that jacket on the hardcover. Actually, the paperback design is appealingly interesting, too, given the above perspective.

When I was more than half-way through the book, I noticed that the most current paperback design was very different; it applied an ebony background with a maze hedge stylized with a target in its center. Possibly due to the brain's need to "connect dots" that center symbol flashed my focus to the target used for Susan Silverman's practice with a fire arm in CRIMSON ROSE, # 15 in Robert B. Parker's Spenser series, which I reviewed recently. For some reason I continue seeing links between Spenser's world and Archy's, and what a stretch that is! I wrote about that brain spark in my review of McNally's SECRET.

McNally's Secret
Crimson Joy
The Godwulf Manuscript

Though this may be my last McNally novel to review, I can offset that loss by looking forward to the several Spenser novels I haven't yet read. That thought takes me to my novels; my first thought (actually it felt like a craving) after having finished writing each of them was, "I wish I could read this novel fresh, without having written it."

Thus, it is with added thanks that I have more Spenser novels to experience from that fresh first time of reading. And, that pleasant awareness brings to focus for me the contrast of the author paths involved in the creation and endurance of Spenser and Archy McNally. I believe both situations have brought "amazing" (a prominent word in BLUFF) cultural insights to the history of literature and the mysteries of life.

I love a good story, a good mystery, from almost any angle of approach.

What amazing gifts we have available in all of the above. Maybe that's the "bluff":

That it's all real and it's all a bluff. Long live the spiritual sanctuary of the novel. It almost, sometimes, seems to qualify as a church.

Linda Shelnutt
iSlate
An ethereal quality which I quite enjoyed bled through into parts of this # 6 novel in Vincent Lardo's Archy collection (# 13 in the whole series). In certain luxuriously drawn scenes, I could almost sense light pouring holes through the pages, similarly to images which have been portrayed in movies like the Harry Potter series, and The Never Ending Story. In McNally's BLUFF, Lardo had honed his author skills so well, he seemed to be literally producing magic in how certain scenes lifted off the pages and danced before, around, and within me. One scene in particular, which was infused with this type of "living light," was of the short yacht excursion to which Archy and Georgy were invited by Carolyn Taylor, and which included her boy toy, Billy, and Connie and Alex.

While reading BLUFF I was able to conceptualize another of the core differences I've been sensing (on an edge of unconsciousness) between Sanders and Lardo. Lawrence Sander seemed to naturally view life through a philosophical perspective; Vincent Lardo seems to look at human machinations through a sociological lens. Each seasoned author etched those leanings, consciously or not, into their thematic content, plot structure, and designs of Archy's motivations, curiosities, and basic drives through life. Sanders was automatically focused on the meaning of life itself, and how to get the most out of the experience as an individual. Lardo seems to automatically center on the interconnections among human beings, especially as they're separated socially or politically into clusters, cliques, or classes.

I don't know if these two authors fully realized how they were driven by this type of targeted viewpoint, when they were in process with a plot. Probably few of us do. Yet, I believe we're each driven by unique needs to know, by unique curiosities, which we each possess at core, at the center, the target of our essence-of-being, and of moving forward.

In SECRET, Sanders had Archy state that we're all hedonists at heart, though few of us admit it. In essence, through his McNally series, Sanders uses Archy to dramatize that unique, individual desire to know what gives personal pleasure, what gives a sense of satisfaction, why it does so, and how to enhance that need to "suck the marrow out of life."

In BLUFF, Lardo's Archy seems to imply that we (as human beings) tend to compare ourselves to others at higher levels in social class structure, and that we need to belong, to be accepted within the cream of social strata. Yet, at the same time we've been liberally taught to revile luxury, opulence, privilege and class.

These contrasts bring to mind the thematic essence of Ayn Rand's novels, FOUNTAINHEAD and ATLAS SHRUGGED. Are we naturally oriented, as a species, to self or to others; and which is the prime/ethical way of being.

In myself, I have felt the natural needs of both Archies. I am very much an individual, and have released some of the culturally induced taint of feeling evil in having chosen to allow myself to center in a personal focus. Yet, I also crave to connect with and relate to others, fairly, sometimes intimately in friendship (to mutual benefit), and rightly. I'm wondering if this might be why, along with many others, I've been so fascinated with this series, especially given the comparisons and contrasts of the dual authorship.

In an overall balance I'm more of a philosopher/psychologist, than a sociologist, and I know that's one of the reasons I enjoy the Spenser series. To me, Parker seems more like Sanders than Lardo, in his art, yet, like Lardo, Parker works with (and entertains through) sociological issues, too.

Seeing this perspective contrast between the Sanders and Lardo Archies, the fact begins to clarify for me, of the two personas' varied needs to control (or not) others and their environments. If a person's focus is based comfortably in oneself, there's less or no need to control others. Whereas, if one is based in needs for social interaction, and for acceptance and approval from outside oneself, the need to control becomes natural, sometimes vital for emotional (and physical) survival. Though Ayn Rand does so, I do not want to conclude yet that one or the other type of personality structure is ethically right or wrong, morally good or evil. Maybe the correct fact is that we're each naturally different in these types of slants, and in different phases of maturity. I will admit, though, that the less I feel a need to control, the better I like life and myself.

An angry face of a gorgeous tiger was featured on the book jacket design on the hardcover of McNally's BLUFF (# 13 in this series). At first the symbolism in that design had me puzzled, as I attempted to connect it to the plot. I had wondered why a maze hadn't been used as the graphic symbol... until I contrasted the appealingly brassy red-and-gold colors, and tiger in the bulls-eye on BLUFF's jacket, to the ritzy but somber black-and-gold book jacket on the hardback of McNally's SECRET (the pilot to the series). That cover design comparison gave me a double-bulls-eye "ah ha!" into the slightly different focus of Sanders and Lardo in their offerings in this series.

With McNally's BLUFF, which appears to be the final book in the series, the McNally family's carnival history "secret" is coming full circle...

I didn't want to see that circus circle closing, or stepping fully out of the closet in all its gore and glory. If I saw that too clearly, I might have to accept an underlying significance that # 13 is truly the end of this series. No!

If that is so, however, McNally's BLUFF accomplished that honor of closing this series with amazing grace and literary panache!

In view of this speculation, I needed to read BLUFF on one of my slowest savor speeds. As I did so, I gradually came to love the perfection of that jacket on the hardcover. Actually, the paperback design is appealingly interesting, too, given the above perspective.

When I was more than half-way through the book, I noticed that the most current paperback design was very different; it applied an ebony background with a maze hedge stylized with a target in its center. Possibly due to the brain's need to "connect dots" that center symbol flashed my focus to the target used for Susan Silverman's practice with a fire arm in CRIMSON ROSE, # 15 in Robert B. Parker's Spenser series, which I reviewed recently. For some reason I continue seeing links between Spenser's world and Archy's, and what a stretch that is! I wrote about that brain spark in my review of McNally's SECRET.

Though this may be my last McNally novel to review, I can offset that loss by looking forward to the several Spenser novels I haven't yet read. That thought takes me to my novels; my first thought (actually it felt like a craving) after having finished writing each of them was, "I wish I could read this novel fresh, without having written it."

Thus, it is with added thanks that I have more Spenser novels to experience from that fresh first time of reading. And, that pleasant awareness brings to focus for me the contrast of the author paths involved in the creation and endurance of Spenser and Archy McNally. I believe both situations have brought "amazing" (a prominent word in BLUFF) cultural insights to the history of literature and the mysteries of life.

I love a good story, a good mystery, from almost any angle of approach.

What amazing gifts we have available in all of the above. Maybe that's the "bluff":

That it's all real and it's all a bluff. Long live the spiritual sanctuary of the novel. It almost, sometimes, seems to qualify as a church.

Linda Shelnutt
Wenyost
Love the book!!
Voodoozragore
Archie McNally is a timeless good time! Each book is different and holds my interest. (I also keep a dictionary near by - so much fun to learn new words!)
Ranenast
Another great McNally story...great reading, they just end too soon.
Original
Another good Sanders book. I really like the entire McNally series.
Eseve
This is a great series...
Good
McNally's Bluff (Sanders, Lawrence) download epub
Thrillers & Suspense
Author: Vincent Lardo
ISBN: 0399151893
Category: Mystery, Thriller & Suspense
Subcategory: Thrillers & Suspense
Language: English
Publisher: Putnam Adult; 1st edition (August 3, 2004)
Pages: 320 pages