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Lawrence Sanders: McNally's Dilemma: An Archy McNally Novel (Archy McNally Novels) download epub

by Lawrence Sanders,Boyd Gaines


Epub Book: 1847 kb. | Fb2 Book: 1305 kb.

McNally's Dilemma book.

McNally's Dilemma book. The attempt by Vincent Lardo gave an interesting slant to McNally, but his style of writing wasn't the same as Mr. Sanders. For the first time, it was clear how the story would evolve, and that's another indication that Lawrence Sanders did So So McNally story It was only by reading the fine print that I learned that this novel was Not by Lawrence Sanders.

Items related to Lawrence Sanders: McNally's Dilemma: An Archy . Gaines performs well in this abridgment, giving McNally a smooth, understated baritone that is never flustered.

Items related to Lawrence Sanders: McNally's Dilemma: An Archy McNally. Lawrence Sanders Lawrence Sanders: McNally's Dilemma: An Archy McNally Novel (Archy McNally Novels). ISBN 13: 9780671576929. One is a blackmail scheme; the other is helping a friend accused of murdering her philandering husband.

Only 6 left in stock (more on the way)

Only 6 left in stock (more on the way). Ships from and sold by booklync.

Vincent Lardo, Lawrence Sanders

Vincent Lardo, Lawrence Sanders. When Decimus Fortesque, the millionaire collector of wives and rare manuscripts, hires Archy McNally to locate the Holy Grail of missing tomes-the complete text of Truman Capote's Answered Prayers-Palm Beach's premier . uncovers nothing but scandal. Luscious Claudia Lester claims to have had the manuscript but declares that her lover, Matthew Harrigan, ran off with it; a lover scorned, Harrigan says Claudia is lying. And Rodney Whitehead, a shady antiques dealer, maintains that neither.

Lawrence Sanders' McNally's Dilemma. An Archy McNally Novel. Archy McNally, Book 6. By: Lawrence Sanders. Narrated by: Boyd Gaines. Length: 3 hrs and 13 mins. Narrated by: Victor Bevine. Length: 8 hrs and 43 mins. This novel represents the first appearance of Lawrence Sanders' most famous character, Edward X. Delaney, and the masterpiece of murder and suspense that launched Sanders' career. This suspenseful classic is brought to life by a full cast, including L. J. Ganser, Marc Vietor, Mark Boyett, Zoe Hunter, Gabra Zackman, Lauren Fortgang, Kevin T. Collins, Josh Hurley and Peter Ganim.

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자가 Lawrence Sanders인 McNally's Dilemma: An Archy McNally Novel의 오디오북입니다. Palm Beach private investigator Archy McNally takes on the murder of a socialite and uncovers a thorny tangle of blackmail and deceit, south Florida style. Playboy Geoffrey Williams is dead. After finding Geoff in a precarious position with an attractive young lady, she pulled the trigger on husband number two.

Lawrence Sanders (March 15, 1920 – February 7, 1998) was an American novelist and short story writer. Lawrence Sanders was born in Brooklyn in New York City. After public school he attended Wabash College, where he obtained a Bachelor of Arts degree. He then returned to New York and worked at Macy's Department Store. In 1943 he joined the United States Marine Corps and was discharged in 1946.

McNally's caper (mcnally). Archy, an occasional investigator for his stuffy lawyer father, here agrees to look into the sudden "uptick" in business that is worrying a pretty exec at the exclusive Whitcomb Funeral Homes. Too many people are dying, observes the woman, and being shipped up north in coffins. In the first novel in Lawrence Sanders's bestselling Deadly Sins series, New York cop Edward Delaney chases a serial killer who's armed with a mysterious weaponNew York Police Department Captain Edward Delaney is called to the scene of a brutal murder.

0 5 Author: Lawrence Sanders Narrator: Boyd Gaines.

After confessing to killing her playboy husband, Melva Williams implores Archy McNally to protect her gorgeous and spirited daughter Veronica from the probing eyes of the press, but McNally discovers that nothing is what is seems in the world of high society.

Comments: (7)

lets go baby
I didn't realize this installment of the series was written by a different until I'd finished the book. That may explain why I thought I'd missed a book before reading this one. It's still a good read, but I don't think this author thoroughly researched the previous books before penning this installment. Why does her refer to Connie as archy's fiancé? Where's Binky's girlfriend and why does he say that Binky's stint in the pet shop was a failure? I had hoped that this plot line would have Binky and his girl taking over the bird store they both enjoyed. I thought the outcome was predictable, not much of a surprise. What bothered me most was Archy's lust for a young girl he'd known, and shared family moments with, since she was a child. We all know he's a lovable horn dog but Archy's kind of gave me the creeps this time around.
Washington
(Other editions of this novel are also available from Amazon, on Super Saver Shipping offers. Type the title, McNALLY'S DILEMMA, into Amazon's search box to get to the buying pages for those editions.)

This being the notorious "take over" novel by Vincent Lardo, I was particularly interested in how Vince would crook his finger to the reader, and how he would work into the role of Lawrence Sanders's Archy McNally. The reader "in" was steak tartare, a $14.95 plate on the menu upgrade at the Pelican Club. By another name, "Steak Tartare" was a hamburger, juicy, rare.

Hamburger up! Phase one locked in.

In opening scenes Lardo appeared to have Archy's entertaining "Voice" in order, with a handle on most if not all the nuances which have enhanced this series. Yet, I felt a wisp of an added designer scent to this "new" man leading ths show. This guy felt subtly darker, more intense, like a wolf in sheep's clothing, not to imply that the Sanders Archy was a sheep. He was not.

Reading onward in McNally's DILEMMA, I noticed the differences between the two Archy's continuing to flicker, like old celluloid running through a movie projector. The original character had a feel of a free-spirited-youth in a mature-male-body. Lardo's Voice for Archy seemed an octave lower, and Lardo's Archy had a macho undercurrent.

The original Archy could giggle ... at any spontaneous moment.

Lardo's Archy would be able to burst spontaneously into a manly type of laughter, possibly described as a deep chuckle fluctuating with a high pitched peel. But, he could not produce a true, free-flowing giggle... unless, possibly, if he were plowed out of his mind by long applied liquor ... or if he were to reside too long in the Sanders Archy's shoes.

The Sanders Archy could easily play act the light grace of a ballerina, for and in fun. If Lardo's Archy tried that he would appear the classic bull in a china closet, probably stubbing his toe; and his late-morning, beard-shadow would ruin the show (or slide it into farce). Archy-1 might own a light stubble in the morning if he hadn't shaved since the previous morning, but a late-morning shadow would never darken his facade, at least not naturally by way of wiry hairs popping forth in dense supply, a few hours after the blade had scratched paths of baby-buns effect.

I found myself hoping that this stubbled, more intensely male Archy would maintain the market demand which survived Sanders' demise. To that end, I wondered how Lardo would work in Archy's bottom line appeal, as exposed in McNally's SECRET:

>> "I had lived through dire warnings of nuclear catastrophe, global warming, ozone depletion, universal extinction via cholesterol, and the invasion of killer bees. After a while my juices stopped their panicky surge and I realized I was bored with all these screeched predictions of Armageddon due next Tuesday. It hadn't happened yet, had it? The old world tottered along, and I was content to totter along with it." <<

Lardo's Archy paraphrased the above sentiment in DILEMMA, as he also linked to many thoughts, themes, and scenes from the original 7 novels. Those tributary reminders gave warm, effective touches. However, somehow Lardo's paraphrase of the above passage felt hollow. The femme fatal's question, "Why can't you be serious, Archy," almost seemed to puzzle Archy-2 as much as it did the woman posing it.

As I read along with Lardo's Archy, observing how he handled heated situations, I continued to see this new man as a push/direct type of guy, acting in clear confidence (though, at times, that esteem slipped under a graciously appropriate humility).

To me the old Archy cajoled much, but did not seem to have a habit of pushing or directing, and often his confidence was endearingly and genuinely lax, as he tottered along, playing with life's dictates as a youthful spirit carrying a complex sensitivity which sometimes slipped into a contemplative moodiness. I loved the way he would work himself out of those dark-side slips by using (and detailing to the reader) his cherished daily routines, reveling in them, mentioning the flavors and items of nearly every meal, every afternoon dunk in the ocean, every evening pause with his journal, when he often turned aside to speak directly to his reader.

The new Archy touched upon, but didn't seem to WALLOW within simple routines, or elaborate meals; most of his underlying focus seemed to be on powering, with finesse or foible, through problems. And, I had the feeling that Lardo would not harbor a hidden dream of, in his late thirties, living in his father's mansion. Early in the plot, Archy-2 gave off subtle scents of seeming not to understand, nor to like pater McNally.

Contrasting all this, periodic flickers of the old Archy flashed through Lardo in clear brilliance.

At "off" times it appeared that Lardo did not quite get Sanders' motivation for writing a character like Archy McNally, did not precisely comprehend the market success of a rarely serious Archy being a true heroic persona to great masses of readers. It appeared that, to Lardo the old Archy was somewhat of a simpering wimp, and, furthermore, why did he live in gawd-awful, flooding Florida, instead of NYC, when he obviously had the choice to do so. This is my speculation of Lardo's possible feelings; I get the Florida appeal, as well as the charisma of NYC (if one has money to maintain the lifestyles).

Will Archy-2 carry the series? According to observations of reviews and steady sales ranks on Amazon, readers want more Archibald by Vincent.

Though I miss the old Archy, I was attracted to the changed nuances in McNally's DILEMMA, and I believe Archy-2 will carry the series into a stronger style, not quite as delicately sophisticated (with none, or less of, the figurative ballerina dancing, contemplative moods, or extended introspection ... or giggles).

At this point, I'm recalling a feeling I had reading the original Archy's attractions to women. I often wondered why they seemed to lack the type of deep-throated, Adam's Apple "gggrrrrrrrrr" which Lardo's Archy would naturally have been able to give them (though the Sanders Archy was amusingly, artistically sensual). When Archy 2 described Victoria Manning I could feel his seething attraction. That gave an effective sensual substance.

As noted, the new Archy was a living, heavily breathing, sauntering, strutting male. How could that guy take over a character as stylishly, delicately, sensitively sensual as the Lawrence Sanders Archy McNally?

He could not. Viva la difference.

I feel an amusing, warm empathy for Lardo's willingness to dawn Archy's hats, scarves, and shoes. How could he not? I hope Vincent Lardo will be able to fully link to the unique market of his appeal, because that market exists. I'll give McNally's FOLLY a chance to grow the appeals of Archy-2. How could I not? (See my Listmania for titles/links for this series and Lardo's web site address.)

This novel does not have "twists and turns." It has a labyrinth of convolutions, and the wrap of them bogged the gulls in my mind.

Hats off to Lardo. Salute!

Linda G. Shelnutt
White gold
This being the notorious "take over" novel by Vincent Lardo, I was particularly interested in how Vince would crook his finger to the reader, and how he would work into the role of Lawrence Sanders's Archy McNally. The reader "in" was steak tartare, a $14.95 plate on the menu upgrade at the Pelican Club. By another name, "Steak Tartare" was a hamburger, juicy, rare.

Hamburger up! Phase one locked in.

In opening scenes Lardo appeared to have Archy's entertaining "Voice" in order, with a handle on most if not all the nuances which have enhanced this series. Yet, I felt a wisp of an added designer scent to this "new" man leading ths show. This guy felt subtly darker, more intense, like a wolf in sheep's clothing, not to imply that the Sanders Archy was a sheep. He was not.

Reading onward in McNally's DILEMMA, I noticed the differences between the two Archy's continuing to flicker, like old celluloid running through a movie projector. The original character had a feel of a free-spirited-youth in a mature-male-body. Lardo's Voice for Archy seemed an octave lower, and Lardo's Archy had a macho undercurrent.

The original Archy could giggle ... at any spontaneous moment.

Lardo's Archy would be able to burst spontaneously into a manly type of laughter, possibly described as a deep chuckle fluctuating with a high pitched peel. But, he could not produce a true, free-flowing giggle... unless, possibly, if he were plowed out of his mind by long applied liquor ... or if he were to reside too long in the Sanders Archy's shoes.

The Sanders Archy could easily play act the light grace of a ballerina, for and in fun. If Lardo's Archy tried that he would appear the classic bull in a china closet, probably stubbing his toe; and his late-morning, beard-shadow would ruin the show (or slide it into farce). Archy-1 might own a light stubble in the morning if he hadn't shaved since the previous morning, but a late-morning shadow would never darken his facade, at least not naturally by way of wiry hairs popping forth in dense supply, a few hours after the blade had scratched paths of baby-buns effect.

I found myself hoping that this stubbled, more intensely male Archy would maintain the market demand which survived Sanders' demise. To that end, I wondered how Lardo would work in Archy's bottom line appeal, as exposed in McNally's SECRET:

>> "I had lived through dire warnings of nuclear catastrophe, global warming, ozone depletion, universal extinction via cholesterol, and the invasion of killer bees. After a while my juices stopped their panicky surge and I realized I was bored with all these screeched predictions of Armageddon due next Tuesday. It hadn't happened yet, had it? The old world tottered along, and I was content to totter along with it." <<

Lardo's Archy paraphrased the above sentiment in DILEMMA, as he also linked to many thoughts, themes, and scenes from the original 7 novels. Those tributary reminders gave warm, effective touches. However, somehow Lardo's paraphrase of the above passage felt hollow. The femme fatal's question, "Why can't you be serious, Archy," almost seemed to puzzle Archy-2 as much as it did the woman posing it.

As I read along with Lardo's Archy, observing how he handled heated situations, I continued to see this new man as a push/direct type of guy, acting in clear confidence (though, at times, that esteem slipped under a graciously appropriate humility).

To me the old Archy cajoled much, but did not seem to have a habit of pushing or directing, and often his confidence was endearingly and genuinely lax, as he tottered along, playing with life's dictates as a youthful spirit carrying a complex sensitivity which sometimes slipped into a contemplative moodiness. I loved the way he would work himself out of those dark-side slips by using (and detailing to the reader) his cherished daily routines, reveling in them, mentioning the flavors and items of nearly every meal, every afternoon dunk in the ocean, every evening pause with his journal, when he often turned aside to speak directly to his reader.

The new Archy touched upon, but didn't seem to WALLOW within simple routines, or elaborate meals; most of his underlying focus seemed to be on powering, with finesse or foible, through problems. And, I had the feeling that Lardo would not harbor a hidden dream of, in his late thirties, living in his father's mansion. Early in the plot, Archy-2 gave off subtle scents of seeming not to understand, nor to like pater McNally.

Contrasting all this, periodic flickers of the old Archy flashed through Lardo in clear brilliance.

At "off" times it appeared that Lardo did not quite get Sanders' motivation for writing a character like Archy McNally, did not precisely comprehend the market success of a rarely serious Archy being a true heroic persona to great masses of readers. It appeared that, to Lardo the old Archy was somewhat of a simpering wimp, and, furthermore, why did he live in gawd-awful, flooding Florida, instead of NYC, when he obviously had the choice to do so. This is my speculation of Lardo's possible feelings; I get the Florida appeal, as well as the charisma of NYC (if one has money to maintain the lifestyles).

Will Archy-2 carry the series? According to observations of reviews and steady sales ranks on Amazon, readers want more Archibald by Vincent.

Though I miss the old Archy, I was attracted to the changed nuances in McNally's DILEMMA, and I believe Archy-2 will carry the series into a stronger style, not quite as delicately sophisticated (with none, or less of, the figurative ballerina dancing, contemplative moods, or extended introspection ... or giggles).

At this point, I'm recalling a feeling I had reading the original Archy's attractions to women. I often wondered why they seemed to lack the type of deep-throated, Adam's Apple "gggrrrrrrrrr" which Lardo's Archy would naturally have been able to give them (though the Sanders Archy was amusingly, artistically sensual). When Archy 2 described Victoria Manning I could feel his seething attraction. That gave an effective sensual substance.

As noted, the new Archy was a living, heavily breathing, sauntering, strutting male. How could that guy take over a character as stylishly, delicately, sensitively sensual as the Lawrence Sanders Archy McNally?

He could not. Viva la difference.

I feel an amusing, warm empathy for Lardo's willingness to dawn Archy's hats, scarves, and shoes. How could he not? I hope Vincent Lardo will be able to fully link to the unique market of his appeal, because that market exists. I'll give McNally's FOLLY a chance to grow the appeals of Archy-2. How could I not? (See my Listmania for titles/links for this series and Lardo's web site address.)

This novel does not have "twists and turns." It has a labyrinth of convolutions, and the wrap of them bogged the gulls in my mind.

Hats off to Lardo. Salute!

Linda G. Shelnutt
Author of:
Molasses Moon
Myrtle's Ultimate Mystery
The Rose and the Pyramid (The Books of Gem)
Lawrence Sanders: McNally's Dilemma: An Archy McNally Novel (Archy McNally Novels) download epub
Thrillers & Suspense
Author: Lawrence Sanders,Boyd Gaines
ISBN: 0671576925
Category: Mystery, Thriller & Suspense
Subcategory: Thrillers & Suspense
Language: English
Publisher: Simon & Schuster Audio; Abridged edition (July 1, 1999)