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The Garden of Last Days: A Novel download epub

by Dan John Miller,Andre Dubus III


Epub Book: 1332 kb. | Fb2 Book: 1555 kb.

Ian McEwan on his novel Nutshell – books podcast: The award-winning novelist explains to a Guardian Live audience why he picked a foetus as narrator of his latest novel, Nutshell.

More Audiobooks By Andre Dubus Iii. Skip carousel. carousel previous carousel next. House of Sand and Fog. Andre Dubus III. Gone So Long: A Novel. Related Audiobooks. Ian McEwan on his novel Nutshell – books podcast: The award-winning novelist explains to a Guardian Live audience why he picked a foetus as narrator of his latest novel, Nutshell.

Andre Dubus repeats the familiar Garden of Eden myth in his novel Garden of Last Days. What's to become of these fictional characters? What do they tell us about Dubus' view of the world in the garden of last days? Last Days? What becomes of the characters after they die?

Andre Dubus repeats the familiar Garden of Eden myth in his novel Garden of Last Days. What is the nature of man; does he have free will; and what is his purpose? Eden is an enclosed garden with two trees: the tree of the knowledge of good and evil, and the tree of immortality, the landscape of the soul. What's to become of these fictional characters? What do they tell us about Dubus' view of the world in the garden of last days? Last Days? What becomes of the characters after they die?

Dan John Miller reads clearly and with good pacing, but his deep monotone lacks emotion. Andre Dubus repeats the familiar Garden of Eden myth in his novel Garden of Last Days.

Dan John Miller reads clearly and with good pacing, but his deep monotone lacks emotion. While the writing is certainly first rate and the characters completely realistic, Miller fails to capture the listener's attention. What is the nature of man; does he have free will; and what is his purpose?

The Garden of Last Days is a 2008 novel by Andre Dubus III. It tells the interweaving stories of several individuals in Florida in the days before the September 11 attacks

The Garden of Last Days is a 2008 novel by Andre Dubus III. It tells the interweaving stories of several individuals in Florida in the days before the September 11 attacks. The book is a follow up to House of Sand and Fog. One early September night in Florida, April, a stripper at the "Puma Club for Men" brings her daughter to work when her usual babysitter is in the hospital. That night, April has an unusual client, a foreigner both remote and too personal, and free with his money.

Andre Dubus III draws us into the lives of three deeply flawed, driven .

Andre Dubus III draws us into the lives of three deeply flawed, driven people whose paths intersect on a September night in Florida. April, a stripper, has brought her daughter to work at the Puma Club for Men. There she encounters Bassam, a foreign client both remote and too personal and free with his money.

Also by Andre Dubus III. Title Page. Set in the seamy underside of American life at the moment before the world changed, The Garden of Last Days has all the psychological tension of Andre Dubus’s bestselling House of Sand and Fog. About the Author

Also by Andre Dubus III. About the Author. Andre Dubus III is the author of Bluesman, The Cage Keeper and Other Stories and the bestselling House of Sand and Fog. He lives with his family north of Boston. Also by Andre Dubus III. Bluesman. The Cage Keeper and Other Stories.

III’s The Garden of Last Days, while still needing to gauge the general reception of the heavily anticipated novel. Dubus III characterizations are almost without fail arrogant judgments of a class of people that is generally the norm in America today (arrogant statement of itself)

I didn’t want anything I read to influence my interpretation of the book until we got our thoughts in print. Dubus III characterizations are almost without fail arrogant judgments of a class of people that is generally the norm in America today (arrogant statement of itself). April is a self imposed tragedy (beautiful teenage girl trapped in an adult’s body).

Andre Dubus III was born on September 11, 1959 in Oceanside, California. He is the son of the acclaimed writer Andre Dubus, and mystery writer James Lee Burke is his cousin. Dubus attended Bradford College, where his father taught, and then switched to the University of Texas at Austin where he studied sociology, political science and economics. He dropped out of a P. program, signed on at a construction site, and began boxing. A friend convinced Dubus to start writing, and he wrote in his spare time till getting a job teaching writing at Emerson.

The windows were rolled up, and man, once the day got going it could get real hot in there. But it was too late to reach for just one more Miller. He didn’t want to smell like beer when Caporelli drove up to find him pinned under the bucket. MoreLess Show More Show Less. And how would she feel when she woke up in a strange car in a strange garage by herself?Goddamnit, he should’ve taken her inside Mama’s or back home to Deena. If he was going to do something good for this girl, then damnit he should’ve done it all the wa. e was driving north when he should be heading south to Lido Key, but there was the municipal fishing pier at the north end of Ringling’s Causeway.

Like its predecessor, The Garden of Last Days features a vulnerable young female protagonist, in this .

Like its predecessor, The Garden of Last Days features a vulnerable young female protagonist, in this case April, a stripper and single mother, who also has a Middle Eastern adversary (a fundamentalist terrorist instead of an ex-military crony of the Shah of Iran). And, again, she too has a would-be protector, not a misguided cop this time, but a poetry-loving bouncer called Lonnie. Tension and confusion are wrought from every spare yet evocative sentence.

April’s usual babysitter, Jean, has had a panic attack that has landed her in the hospital. April doesn’t really know anyone else, so she decides it’s best to have her three-year-old daughter close by, watching children’s videos in the office while she works. April works at the Puma Club for Men. And tonight she has an unusual client, a foreigner both remote and too personal, and free with his money. Lots of it, all cash. His name is Bassam. Meanwhile, another man, AJ, has been thrown out of the club for holding hands with his favorite stripper, and he’s drunk and angry and lonely. From these explosive elements comes a relentless, raw, searing, passionate, page-turning narrative, a big-hearted and painful novel about sex and parenthood and honor and masculinity. Set in the seamy underside of American life at the moment before the world changed, it juxtaposes lust for domination with hunger for connection, sexual violence with family love. It seizes the listener by the throat with the same psychological tension, depth, and realism that characterized Andre Dubus’s bestselling House of Sand and Fog – and an even greater sense of the dark and anguished places in the human heart.

Comments: (7)

Pedora
I see the huge split on this book and understand it to some extent. Like me, many reviewers came to it having read the outstanding "House of Sand and Fog" with very high expectations. Second, the gift for language that Dubus possesses undoubtedly carried many along -- myself included -- hoping that the novel would ultimately deliver its long-promised prize. Upon arriving at the novel's surprisingly flat ending, it's understandable some readers might have concluded they must have missed the author's subtle point.

I think, unfortunately, this was a poorly conceived and executed novel by a writer of great talent. However tantalizing the initial premise -- the prospect of a stripper who brings her child to work and loses her daughter woven together with a potential terrorist in the house, an addled customer thrown out over his misplaced love for a dancer and a bouncer with both a conscience a taste for violence -- none of it ultimately comes together. The "connections" prove to be random. There is no plot device, no carefully constructed string of events, no philosophical point of view that ties the characters together. A chance meeting between a stripper and a terrorist on the night a guy gets thrown out of the strip club and picks up the stripper's kid is not the foundation for a novel, whatever the skill of the writer. Anyone of us might be in the room tomorrow with a guy or women who makes news for all the wrong reasons, but that wouldn't make our story worth telling.

The cardinal sin, however, is Dubus gave us very little reason to care about the characters. The portrayal of Bassam, the man bent on terror, is tedious and filled with cardboard ideological utterances. That may befit the character of those who spend their lives plotting how to exact revenge on their supposed Western oppressors, but that didn't make him in the least bit interesting. April, the stripper, demands very little in the way of empathy, and we're given far too little about her to form any kind of emotional connection. The inner monologues of A.J., the reluctant kidnapper, build some momentum, but in the end his actions are far too stupid and misguided to maintain much interest.

The reader waits in vain as he turns the final pages for a conclusion that brings satisfaction. The final message seems to be that life goes on. Okay, but I was left feeling no curiosity about what might happen to the characters who survived. It's a strangely weak novel that certainly doesn't sustain interst over its 500-plus pages. Dubus would have done well to cut the length in half. Best skipped in favor of his beautifully crafted previous novel.
WtePSeLNaGAyko
It has bee said there are no new stories; we repeat the same stories; and they come from mythical narrations passed from generation to generation. Andre Dubus repeats the familiar Garden of Eden myth in his novel Garden of Last Days. When he links complex contemporary characters to the myth we know he intends to ponder universal questions. What is the nature of man; does he have free will; and what is his purpose?

Eden is an enclosed garden with two trees: the tree of the knowledge of good and evil, and the tree of immortality, the landscape of the soul. Configuring the novel with myth puts Dubus in company with Joseph Campbell who uses myth to find spiritual meaning in a postmodern world, which is exactly what Dubus attempts.

He sets his novel in the tropical landscape of Florida. He contrasts elements of the tree of knowledge of good and evil by describing Jean's lovely garden and the sleazy Puma Club. Behind Jean's enclosed garden is innocent goodness, full of light--the perfect setting for April's three year old daughter Franny. The Puma Club, a strip joint, is another enclosed garden, but it is dark, a setting for degradation where women commodify themselves selling sexuality, and lonely men numb themselves with drugs and booze in a misguided effort to make a human connection.

Although April spends her nights entertaining in this garden of lost innocence, she lives in both gardens and is the tie to all the characters in the story. Once Dubus introduces the characters he constructs a plot that moves the narrative to a fatalistic conclusion. Do the characters have free will or are their lives predictable? The reader knows early in the story where the plot is going. Does Dubus think the players have any choice about their fate?

He cares deeply about all of them. He details them in small increments. First he portrays stereotypes: April, single mother, exotic dancer; Jean, elderly lonely widow; AJ, divorced father and alcoholic; and Bassam, Muslim fundamentalist terrorist. Each time Dubus returns to detail a character he gives more facets--flashbacks revealing childhood, motivations, and human vulnerabilities. One of Dubus' interests is how the role of mother affects each character. He spells out April's interactions with her mother, AJ's, Bassam's; and the influence these mothers had on their children. Dubus presents April as mother to Franny; he presents Jean, childless, but also a mother the Franny. AJ, though male, is a nurturing mother-figure, better than his wife Deena, to his own son and to Franny. Dubus struggles with these imperfect mothers, who come up short cherishing their own children, imprinting them with weakness.

A sensitive observer, a genius at detail, Dubus does not accept a one dimensional stereotype. His characters contradict themselves: evil ones are sometimes kind; kind ones show a dark side. Just when the reader is ready to condemn a character Dubus slips in a vulnerable fact and the reader starts to care. Bassam, a terrorist with a warped perspective, becomes human when Dubus inserts an incident from childhood that lets the reader know how insecure Bassam is, how conflicted he was in relationship to his father. Despicable AJ drives drunk with Franny in his truck, but when the reader sees his sincere concern for the child, AJ is no longer simply an old drunk. The reader has empathy for the characters because Dubus cares about each of them.

What's to become of these fictional characters? What do they tell us about Dubus' view of the world in the garden of last days? Last Days? What becomes of the characters after they die?
Joseph Campbell says myth is shaped by recognition of mortality and the requirement to transcend it is the first great impulse to mythology. He says the second impulse is that the social group that nourishes man existed before him and will survive him. And finally Campbell says that man, aware of his landscape, relates himself to the universe, not as the center of the universe but as a part. Is this the way Dubus sees the world? We all live in the garden of last days. We are all interrelated. We have choices and we impact each other.

What is Dubus' answer to the universal questions: what is the nature of man; does he have free will; and what is his purpose? Dubus seems to believe in fate, but he also believes in social interaction. He clearly sees evil and innocence as part of the human condition. Does he believe we really have free will? His novel asks questions but leaves many questions unanswered. Myth may be the only way to get to the essence of the human condition.
Valawye
...of reading this incredible novel. What a storyteller, Dubus is! I could not put the book down and read it basically straight through in 2 days. I cared about almost all of the characters, except Bassam. I felt that Dubus really did his research on some of the factors that led up to 9/11. The strip club subculture was fascinating and sounded very realistic. I really cared about April and Franny! AND I cared about AJ, bless his doofus heart. I kept hoping he'd get out of jail and lead a more productive and happy life.

Some of the reviewers have commented on Dubus' writing being overblown, but I couldn't disagree more. As a matter of fact, I noticed that with the closing of each chapter the last sentence would be written in the most beautiful, descriptive manner. Not overblown at all. A great writer and an incredible read.
The Garden of Last Days: A Novel download epub
Thrillers & Suspense
Author: Dan John Miller,Andre Dubus III
ISBN: 1423366573
Category: Mystery, Thriller & Suspense
Subcategory: Thrillers & Suspense
Language: English
Publisher: Brilliance Audio; Unabridged edition (June 2, 2008)