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The scandal of psychotherapy: A guide to resolving the tensions between faith and counseling download epub

by Clinton W McLemore


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The Scandal Of Psychotherapy book. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read

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of Psychotherapy : A Guide to Resolving the Tensions Between Faith and Counseling.

book by Clinton W. The Scandal of Psychotherapy : A Guide to Resolving the Tensions Between Faith and Counseling.

The Scandal of Psychotherapy: A Guide for Resolving the Tensions between Faith and Counseling (Wheaton . Brokaw, David . and Clinton W. Toward a More Rigorous Definition of Social Reinforcement: Some Interpersonal Clarifications

The Scandal of Psychotherapy: A Guide for Resolving the Tensions between Faith and Counseling (Wheaton: Tyndale House, 1982). "McLemore, Clinton . worldcat. Toward a More Rigorous Definition of Social Reinforcement: Some Interpersonal Clarifications. Journal of Personality and Social Psychology 4. (1983): 1014-020. see author affiliation note).

Clinton W. McLemore is the author of eight books, including with his wife, Staying One: How to Avoid a. .The Scandal of Psychotherapy: A Guide to Resolving the Tensions Between Faith and Counseling. McLemore is the author of eight books, including with his wife, Staying One: How to Avoid a Make-Believe Marriage (Cascade). Designed to be used in workshops or by individuals, it is accompanied by both a workbook and comprehensive workshop leader’s guide. McLemore holds a P. in Clinical Psychology from the University of Southern California. by McLemore, Clinton, Dr.

If you have done years of psychotherapy in the past and have a strong understanding of yourself, you might just need a round of action-focussed counselling.

Psychotherapy, too, looks at your behavioural patterns that are causing you distress in your daily life. If you have done years of psychotherapy in the past and have a strong understanding of yourself, you might just need a round of action-focussed counselling. Whereas if you have never tried therapy before and have troubles resolving problems, a more open-ended therapy that helps you understand yourself deeply and build self confidence might be life changing.

Presents a clinical discussion of parent-child relations viewed as transactions tending toward the reduction of cognitive inconsistency. The heuristic value of consistency theory is illustrated through application of the balance model to the mother-father-child triad.

Counseling (1). refresh. Member recommendations.

The scandal of psychotherapy. a guide to resolving the tensions between faith and counseling. Published 1982 by Tyndale House Publishers in Wheaton, Ill. Christianity, Psychology, Psychotherapy.

Staying One is a practical guide that not only teaches the spiritual what and .

Staying One is a practical guide that not only teaches the spiritual what and why of marriage but also provides advice and practice in the how. Intended to save readers from the pain of learning the hard way, it illustrates and explains biblically sound approaches to building a healthy and fulfilling marriage that lasts. These include things married people should and shouldn't say to each other. Staying One will prove useful to pastors in their pre-marital counseling and to the couples they are ministering. The book will prove of special interest to engaged couples, newlyweds, those wanting to revitalize their marriages, and married people on the brink of divorce.

Book by McLemore, Clinton W

Comments: (2)

Jan
At the time of writing this 1982 book, Clinton McLemore was a Professor of Psychology at the Graduate School of Psychology at Fuller Theological Seminary. He states in "A Reader's Guide" at the beginning of the book, "This book is addressed to anyone who is seriously interested in understanding the relationship between modern psychological helping methods and the Christian faith."

Here are some representative quotations from the book:

"The absence of Christian theological content is what troubles the Christian, who cannot see how a therapy carried on without reference to Christ could automatically lead a person TO Christ."
"(W)e were able to put the word 'Christian' on the office door and in the telephone book. Everyone coming to us knew at least the general nature of our beliefs. Curiously enough, we found that a fair number of agnostics and atheists came for consultation. Christianity, instead of scaring them off, seemed to offer them a certain comfort, perhaps the reassurance that they would be seen by someone who was 'safe' and not likely to be caught up by the latest Southern California fad or fashion."
"That there is no science of personality to be found in the Bible is precisely what one would expect, since neither does the Bible contain information about microbes or mesons."
"While at times the church has regarded psychology as its enemy, the psychologist is no more the necessary enemy of Christ than the biologist. It is only the religious beliefs, or unbeliefs, of individual scientists or practitioners that are problematic."
Ichalote
Clint McLemore has added another book to a growing literature on the integration of psychology and theology. He claims not to know all the answers, but basically wants to point to many of the issues on integration.

McLemore's greatest contribution to the evangelical debates on integration is his emphasis on the balance between propositions and non-propositions, theology and experience. He has included a brief, but excellent chapter on "Psychotherapy, Spirit, and the Mystical." He suggests that "the Church needs to foster the mystical without falling into the quagmires of mysticism" (p. 128). A healthy Christianity includes a healthy pietism that uses both right and left hemispheres of the brain. Many of the eastern mystical psychological techniques can be used to aide this type of Christian piety.

There are also many positive characteristics of McLemore's integration of psychology and the Christian faith. Although he acknowledges psychotherapy's limitations (it can "never do the radical work of restoring spiritual wholeness of the human person," p. 58) and stands against any theory that reduces spiritual growth to psychological treatment, McLemore advocates the use of psychological treatment as an aide to faith. Psychotherapy functions within the sphere of common grace, sometimes leading to faith, but not necessarily. Nevertheless, god is never left out of the workings of therapy. God can change people either instantly or through a long process.

There are many problems, though, with McLemore's integration. He seems to assume that philosophy and theology have basic assumptions or presuppositions, but science is neutral. "Basic religious questions have very little, if anything, to do with science" (p. 47). This proposition stands in direct contrast to the works of Rushdoony, Kuhn, Klaaren, and others. McLemore attempts to separate scientific propositions from philosophical and religious propositions which simply cannot be done. Truth, whether scientific, philosophic, psychological, or religious, is never neutral. All truth glorifies God and when a person uses any truth against God, it is a moral problem. This sounds like an Adams critique, and McLemore dislikes Adams.

This concept of psychology's neutrality carries through most of McLemore's discussion of integration. He states that psychology is simply not theology, yet Vitz, Kilpatrick, Lasch, and others have well addressed "the religion of psychology." McLemore admits that the science of psychology developed out of this modern age's preoccupation with the self, but does not admit that this preoccupation is the heart of psychology's problem! He says theology needs psychology because, for example, the fruit of the Spirit is psychological. As if the Bible were silent on community and church, he says psychology addresses "the ecclesiological dimensions of emotional healing" (p. 36). This is true in certain respects because psychology's emphasis is humanity and its relationships, but more often than not psychology has stressed human autonomy, self-esteem, self-confidence, personal values, personal identity, individual needs, and individual mental health at the expense of human community, communal values, and biblical law. The Bible's emphasis is on the latter.

Psychotherapy is also affected by McLemore's concept of a neutral psychology. Most of therapy, according to the author, can, and indeed should be, value free. If the therapist feels he should talk about values he must first have the informed consent of the client and at the same time be careful if the culture describes these values or beliefs as pathological, as it does with many of the Christian values. As state licensed therapists, we must be careful to keep ourselves values free, because there is a separation of Church and state. As pertaining to whether a client should disobey God's law, McLemore writes, "The practitioner should point out the probable advantages and disadvantages of each course of action and leave it at that" (p. 74). Although this is often practiced by "Christian therapists," it simply is not biblical. Christians are never called to muffle God's Word and command when working for the state. All therapists act according to religious values; the very act and process of therapy is religious. No therapist is ever neutral, nor indeed should he or she be. We are not human if we separate our beliefs and values from our person, or our soul from our body. McLemore's advice is well taken: it would be more honest to admit our beliefs consciously to the client. In this manner we will be more intellectually and religiously honest than most secular therapists.

McLemore tries to cover too many topics. Although he spends more time on integration issues, his treatise on personality theory and Pauline psychology, mysticism and holistic health movement, and the various techniques of psychotherapy are cursory at best. Although is contentions about integration are well worth reading and exploring, raising many issues to the reader, his chapter on "Christianity and Psychotherapeutic Methods" is hardly worth the time to read, adding nothing new to the field.
The scandal of psychotherapy: A guide to resolving the tensions between faith and counseling download epub
Author: Clinton W McLemore
ISBN: 0842358536
Category: No category
Language: English
Publisher: Tyndale House Publishers (1982)