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The Kabul Beauty School download epub

by Deborah; Ohlson Kristin Rodriguez


Epub Book: 1818 kb. | Fb2 Book: 1330 kb.

She dreamed of beginning a Beauty School to help the Afghan women

She dreamed of beginning a Beauty School to help the Afghan women. She had no money but resourcefully was funded by the generosity of beauty manufacturers and other contributors. A life with memories that she will treasure forever!

This book is dedicated to my father, Junior Turner, who passed away June 5, 2002, while I was on my first trip to Afghanistan. That’s the kind of thing that could get my salon and the Kabul Beauty School itself closed down

This book is dedicated to my father, Junior Turner, who passed away June 5, 2002, while I was on my first trip to Afghanistan. Dad, I never got a chance to tell you about Afghanistan and the school. You left me too soon. I know you would love Sam, my husband-he is just like you, but Afghan style. That’s the kind of thing that could get my salon and the Kabul Beauty School itself closed down. I light candles so that we can turn the overhead lights off. With all the power needed for the machine that melts the wax, the facial lamps, the blow dryers, and the other salon appliances, I don’t want to blow a fuse.

Kabul Beauty School is a remarkable tale of an extraordinary community of women who come together and learn the arts . Deborah Rodriguez has been as a hairdresser since 1979, except for one brief stint when she worked as a corrections officer in her hometown of Holland, Michigan.

Kabul Beauty School is a remarkable tale of an extraordinary community of women who come together and learn the arts of perms, friendship, and freedom. She currently directs the Kabul Beauty School, the first modern beauty academy and training salon in Afghanistan. Rodriguez also owns the Oasis Salon and the Cabul Coffee House. She lives in Kabul with her Afghan husband. Библиографические данные.

An American Woman Goes Behind the Veil. How have these women changed her?

An American Woman Goes Behind the Veil. by Deborah Rodriguez, Kristin Ohlson. How have these women changed her?

By Deborah Rodriguez and Kristin Ohlson. About Kabul Beauty School. Soon after the fall of the Taliban, in 2001, Deborah Rodriguez went to Afghanistan as part of a group offering humanitarian aid to this war-torn nation.

By Deborah Rodriguez and Kristin Ohlson. Category: Biography & Memoir Travel: Middle East.

Find this Pin and more on Books this year by Regina. When Your Book Design Career Starts at Age 10 and Peaks at Crazy, Rich Asians. Joan Wong's parents had a problem: They weren't in the best school district in Brooklyn, and they wanted their daughter to have a solid education. The Illustrious House of Ramires (eBook).

Kabul Beauty School is the rollicking story of one of the strangest foreign-aid projects ever conceived, the creation of. .In addition to Deborah Rodriguez, Kristin Ohlson is also a co-author.

Kabul Beauty School is the rollicking story of one of the strangest foreign-aid projects ever conceived, the creation of an academy to train Afghan beauticians. A surprisingly successful venture, it gives Afghan women practical training convertible into cold cash and personal power, a radical idea in a country where women have the approximate status of dirt.

Kabul Beauty School book. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking Kabul Beauty School: An American Woman Goes Behind the Veil as Want to Read: Want to Read saving. Start by marking Kabul Beauty School: An American Woman Goes Behind the Veil as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

Kabul Beauty School: An American Woman Goes Behind the Veil Deborah Rodriguez,Kristin Ohlson Limited . In 2002, Rodriguez helped found the Kabul Beauty School, the first modern beauty school and training salon in Afghanistan. Bibliographic information.

The Kabul Beauty School: The Art of Friendship and Freedom Deborah Rodriguez,Kristin Ohlson Snippet view - 2007. View all . About the author (2011). The Kabul Beauty School. Hodder & Stoughton, 2011.


Comments: (7)

Tekasa
First off, I read the NY Times article after reading the book. I bought the book one day when the Kindle version was on special. However, after reading the Times article AND the book, I can only surmise that people throwing fits about inaccuracies are making claims that she didn't start the Kabul Beauty School or Beauty Without Borders are upset that she didn't write about them more. She tells that she had an idea, and after she started getting donations, she found out that someone had already started a similar project. She tells these things in the book. Is it possible that she talked a lot about herself and what she did and not about what the other founders or organizers did in great detail because she was telling her story, maybe she had a falling out with these others and instead of talking trash about them she just minimized them without excluding them? Yes. Does the book leave the reader with the feeling that Debbie did everything by herself? Not this reader. It just left me with a sense of her stories, her experiences, and her feelings. I think it's valid. I think.

I have to say that I was honestly impressed with how well the author was able to be completely oblivious to the cultural differences of the men and women in Afghanistan, as compared to her concept of norms, and her ability to own her own accidental insensitivity to them and try to get it right and do better in the future. Seriously, one of the biggest screw-ups I see with people working with people from different cultures is a judgement all insensitivity to others, as though one culture is right and one culture is bad or stupid. Her focus on doing something to empower Afgani women, and then allow them to own that power and do with it what they felt right about within their own lives.

I hope that the author was careful with the stories she shared from other people, and will trust that she has been. I don't know, and I never will, I'm sure. What I can say is that the story flows well. I don't understand the comments some made about incongruous flow. The only time I didn't feel completely within the sequence of the overal story, the internal time line of the book, was when the wedding at the start occurred in relation to other events, but I don't really think it made a huge difference when it occurred in relation to other stories in the memoir. What I care about more than any of the stuff above is that women in Afghanistan are getting empowered, I care that the book is really pretty well written, and I care that an interesting story is being told. I'm sure there are people who were left out, but that's the nature of memories and people telling stories. I can honestly say, though, that I really enjoyed it, I'm glad I bought and read it, and I'm recommending it to friends and family. I hope you check it out and that you enjoy it, too.
Ylonean
Through her unafraid heart and passion for uplifting women to a more independent place, Miss Debbie has immersed me into a world that I would have never been able to understand based solely upon the Western story I’d been told. Her writing was so genuine and easy that I couldn’t put it down (writing this review as I just finished the book in the 4 am hour!). I was mesmerized by the clear picture she painted of the scenery and the people, learning of all of the different tribes in the melting pot of the country. The main lesson that my idealistic heart takes away will be that even the smallest and unconventional efforts do make a difference when the motivation is based in love no matter how long it takes mindsets to truly change. Deep cultural beliefs and practices do have potential for evolution but they won’t be moved by brute force, rather by millions of small souls doing amazing things like sharing themselves in a loving way and giving others hope and knowledge to rise above their situations. And through acceptance we will all be able to appreciate each other and ourselves.
Quamar
The reasons why I liked this book so much are that it was written by someone very, very different from myself but still coming from the heart. I would never, for example, even wear makeup, and have not visited a beauty salon in decades because I don't cut my hair. Yet i have a fascination with other cultures and highly appreciated her look into this one in a way I could never have achieved even had I visited Kabul myself. Now, of course in 2016, I wonder how it has changed. But cultures change very slowly and women are women, so I'm sure the look we got in this book is still authentic. For me, it was a page turner. I've had friends from the Middle East and knew they were unable to tell me what it was like for them there.
artman
I wasn't sure what to expect with this one, but the adventure of going to a foreign country during a time of turmoil to creat a beauty academy just seemed to creative not to be interesting. I was not sorry, and feel sad to arrive at the end of the book wishing to hear more. Kabul Beauty School is a story of brave women, from those who raised funds and collected supplies to open the school to those who stood up against cultural standards to go to the school, then become wage earners for their families. This book covers it all from natural disasters to bad dates to kidnapping and misunderstandings over how to make tea. It is filled with traditions and traditions broken. Definitely a recommended read!
Rose Of Winds
This was a great inside look at women behind the veil. Beauty salons are one of the few places in Afghanistan where women are allowed to remove their burkas and be themselves because men are not allowed inside. When these suppressed women let down their guard, their stories of abuse at the hands of the Taliban, and sometimes their own husbands, are given the spotlight. When an American woman comes to Kabul and opens a beauty school, she empowers these women - turning them into proud businesswomen with their own financial independence, purpose, and means of helping their starving families survive. This book will break your heart at times, but it is ultimately hopeful and triumphant.
Kale
"Kabul Beauty School", was a book that kept my interest. As a reader, I understand that author Deborah Rodriguez, wanted to help women economically by opening Beauty Schools in Afghanistan. The culture there is very different than what we know in the U. S. I felt that Ms. Rodriguez could have helped women in the U.S. by operating Beauty Schools right here. There are many people in America who need help economically. However, "Kabul Beauty School", was an eye opener into a different culture. For this reason, I found it to be an interesting book.
The Kabul Beauty School download epub
Author: Deborah; Ohlson Kristin Rodriguez
ISBN: 0340935243
Category: No category
Language: English
Publisher: Random House; Advanced Reading Copy. edition (2007)