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What is Dungeons and dragons? download epub

by John Butterfield


Epub Book: 1659 kb. | Fb2 Book: 1195 kb.

FREE shipping on qualifying offers. A guide to the phenomenal fantasy game, Dungeons and Dragons, offers tips on role-playing, developing strategies and skills.

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They include a section on dungeon design, going over things like dungeon ecology, avoiding Monty Hall dungeons, and the like. It includes tips like not making every trap with a poison needle save or instant death, when maybe paralysis would be a more appropriate challenge for their character's level, or pitting a newly-invented monster against NPCs to see how it fares. They give a small sample dungeon, and take the party of adventurers created earlier in the book on a run through it, giving a narrative on one page and info on game mechanics on the facing page

This book led me to the incredible world of Dungeons and Dragons and roleplaying games in the early 80.

This book led me to the incredible world of Dungeons and Dragons and roleplaying games in the early 80s. Funny to say that it changed my life for the better but I'm pretty sure my life wouldn't have been as interesting if I hadn't read this book. Shelves: non-fiction, fantasy, gaming. This book, perhaps above all others, is what is responsible for my love of games and all sorts of nerdery.

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John Butterfield has written: 'What is Dungeons & Dragons?' - subject(s): Games, Dungeons and dragons (Game). L. H. Butterfield has written: 'B. Franklin's epitaph' 'John Witherspoon comes to America'. Asked in Authors, Poets, and Playwrights. What has the author L H Butterfield written? L.

A guide to the phenomenal fantasy game, "Dungeons and Dragons," offers tips on role-playing, developing strategies and skills, character generation, game design, and more.

This book, among the easiest to read guides to role-playing ever written, simplified a lot of the concepts and mechanical aspects of the game - among it's innovations was the idea of allowing demi-humans to adopt character classes in Basic D & D - ie. you could have an Elven Thief i. . you could have an Elven Thief if you wanted to. The example dungeon setting meticulously described the Shrine of Kollchap, and stands alone as a dungeon that actually makes sense - not another random collection of monsters waiting in 10'x10' rooms for the marauding adventurers.

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Author:Butterfield, John. Title:What Is Dungeons and Dragons?. Each month we recycle over . million books, saving over 12,500 tonnes of books a year from going straight into landfill sites. Read full description.

Dungeons and Dragons enables you to play out your wildest fantasies, to battle with monsters, giants and . if you do not possess a copy of the Basic book, this book.


Comments: (4)

Ishnsius
Got a copy of this out of the library when I first started playing D&D nice to have it in my book collection.
Lilegha
Despite the internet reviews, this is a fun book that helps the Novice player/Dungeon Master get into the hobby.
ℓo√ﻉ
I don't remember ever noticing this book before; I just purchased it recently at a library fundraiser. The authors were all British schoolboys in their teens according to the book, but they were obviously very knowledgeable and wrote about the subject as well as any adult, I would say. Their style sometimes includes dry humor, as when they calculate that by the movement rates given for wilderness adventures in the Expert set would give a daily rate that would take 54 hours of nonstop walking, and say:

"Either Expert D&D postulates very long days or something is wrong."

Or when they note that monks in AD&D are "'aesthetics' not, as might be expected, 'ascetics'".

The book provides a great deal of explanation and illustration by example for the Basic D&D of its time (which only includes character levels 1-3), going through the concepts behind the game and its mechanics, with an occasional brief digression on Expert and Advanced (both covered in detail later). Grognards will probably have to skim and browse long parts of this, but it does include the interesting tidbit here and there. For instance, they explain that Lawful and Chaotic cannot be equated with good and evil, and give the Daleks as examples of Lawful evil and Dr. Who as Chaotic good.

They include a section on dungeon design, going over things like dungeon ecology, avoiding Monty Hall dungeons, and the like. It includes tips like not making every trap with a poison needle save or instant death, when maybe paralysis would be a more appropriate challenge for their character's level, or pitting a newly-invented monster against NPCs to see how it fares.

They give a small sample dungeon, and take the party of adventurers created earlier in the book on a run through it, giving a narrative on one page and info on game mechanics on the facing page.

The book also has chapters on using computers, which is of course incredibly dated but a great trip down memory lane for someone like me (I once wrote programs to generate characters randomly like they talk about for NPC parties, for instance); info on other games and supplements; and a bibliography of fantasy and other writers relevant to the game; and a glossary of game terms. The bibliography, in particular, should prove very useful to any fantasy/SF fan. The DMG's list of inspiring reading and the Ballantine Adult Fantasy series both probably influenced it, but there are other good things listed, too. They could have included more help on specific titles by many of the authors they list, though. But still, it's nice to see names like James Branch Cabell, E.R. Eddison, Borges, Robert Shea and Robert Anton Wilson, Sir Gawain and the Green Knight, Clark Ashton Smith, etc., along with more obvious entries like Tolkien, R.E. Howard, H.P. Lovecraft, Jack Vance, etc.

One mistake I noticed was that they list the book Fantasy Wargaming as a book about D&D, when it is actually its own system. It is rather heavily inspired in its mechanics, etc., by D&D (and also various wargames), but it does have its own system. It shouldn't be hard to convert its treatment of the creatures of Irish and Welsh legendry, Arthurian romance, Eddas and Sagas, etc., to D&D.

I doubt that the differences between editions would make the book any less useful to a newcomer to RPGs who wants to learn how to play; and the extensive advice for Dungeon Masters should prove useful even to experienced DMs.
PanshyR
I don't know when I got this book, but I'm about to tear it apart and scan it as a pdf file so I don't have to keep the hard copy anymore.

First of all, I'm a player of the original the original 1977 AD&D, and I haven't played since 1985, so my knowledge of the newer versions is little to nothing. While I don't have anything against newer iterations of the AD&D game, I thought the original version worked extremely well and allowed a great deal of flexibility. The popularity of the Dragon magazine and the RPGA (Role Playing Game Association) introduced a plethora of new information from modules, spells, and even character classes, and incorporating them was simply a question of adjusting the original rules to accomodate the enriching material.

As for the book, I didn't need it to explain the game, but I did use it to parse out useful ideas that were helpful, much as I did when I saw an idea in a article published in the Dragon magazine. So does it help one understand D&D?

I don't know. And at this point it doesn't matter because the information contained in the book is essentially dated because the newer 20d system that streamlines game rules across other role playing games. So as a book, it's more useful to academics as a primary source on how D&D and its set of rules was perceived in the early 1980s.

The book is no longer published, and at the time of this review (May 3, 02012), there was one copy available for $0.01 from a 3rd-party vendor. Do you need this book? Probably not, unless you're a role-play gaming historian.
What is Dungeons and dragons? download epub
Author: John Butterfield
ISBN: 0140064605
Category: No category
Language: English
Publisher: Penguin Books (1982)
Pages: 185 pages