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by Misra Subimal


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The early stories of Subimal Misra took the Bengali. Goodreads helps you keep track of books you want to read. Start by marking The Golden Gandhi Statue from America as Want to Read

The early stories of Subimal Misra took the Bengali. Start by marking The Golden Gandhi Statue from America as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

Discover new books on Goodreads. See if your friends have read any of Subimal Misra's books. The Golden Gandhi Statue from America: Early Stories by. Subimal Misra, V. Ramaswamy (Translation). Subimal Misra’s Followers (4). Subimal Misra. Subimal Misra’s books. The Golden Gandhi Statue from America.

Books related to The Golden Gandhi Statue From America. More by Subimal Misra. Wild Animals Prohibited: Stories, Anti-stories. This Could Have Become Ramayan Chamar's Tale: Two Anti-Novels.

Books by Misra Subimal. Apart from the Indian titles, HarperCollins India also distributes books by international bestselling authors such as Doris Lessing, Paulo Coelho, Agatha Christie, Jack Welch, Jack Higgins, Alistair Maclean, Isaac Asimov, Sidney Sheldon, Amitav Ghosh, Cecilia Ahern, . Finn and The Dalai Lama, besides the world-renowned Collins Cobuild and Collins Gem Dictionaries.

The stories in The Golden Gandhi Statue from America are Misra's earliest works, from the late 1960s . One question remains. The publication in English of The Golden Gandhi Statue from America will probably propel Subimal Misra to a celebrity he has derided throughout his career.

The stories in The Golden Gandhi Statue from America are Misra's earliest works, from the late 1960s and early 1970s, but the tone is clear. He is at war not only against the literary establishment and literary convention, but the conventions of a self-satisfied society as a whole. His enemy is the belching babu who takes to literature before his Sunday afternoon nap, savouring a sweet story to read in repose. What will happen then, when his cult becomes conventionally cool?

The Vodafone Crossword Book Award 2010 was declared on 2nd .

The Vodafone Crossword Book Award 2010 was declared on 2nd September 2011 at The Tata Theatre, NCPA - Mumbai. The shortlisted Books in this category are: 1 The Golden Gandhi Statue from America -Early Stories by Subimal Misra, Translated by V Ramaswamy - Harper Collins India 2 Manasarovar by Ashokamitran, Translated by N. Kalyan Raman - Penguin Books India 3 This is not that Dawn by Yashpal, Translated by Anand - Penguin Books India 4 Litanies of Dutch battery by N. S. Madhavan, Translated by.

The Golden Gandhi Statue From America. The early stories of Subimal Misra took the Bengali literary world by storm upon their publication in the late 1960s. An unemployed young man is invited to his lover's wedding and decides to gift her a bottle of his own blood. Rumours of a great big flood or the end of days or a rebellion of refugees in Calcutta fly through the country. Distinct from the conventional modes of storytelling that preceded him, Misra's pieces are more anti-stories than stories, a montage of images that flow into each other and tell a tale with greater power and urgency than narrative fiction.

SUBIMAL MISRA is a retired schoolteacher who lives alone in a flat on. .early writings, which were published in 2010 as The Golden Gandhi Statue from America.

SUBIMAL MISRA is a retired schoolteacher who lives alone in a flat on Kolkata’s southern edge. For the past five decades, he has written stories for Bengali little magazines, including Kabitirtha, Bigyapan Parba and Jari Bobajuddho.

Subimal Misra (born 1943) is a Bengali novelist, short story writer and essayist. He is known as a maverick and audacious experimentalist in contemporary Bengali literature. Many of contemporary writers are Misra's fans and inspired by Misra's writings. Misra is recognized as the most important writer in Bengali in the field of little magazine. Subimal Misra started his literary career at the end of 1967.

An unemployed young man is invited to his lover's wedding and decides to gift her a bottle of his own blood. Rumours of a great big flood or a rebellion of refugees in Calcutta fly through the country. Haran Majhi's starved widow's corpse floats down rivers and swamps and drains as the nation eagerly awaits the unveiling of the golden Gandhi statue from America. The early stories of Subimal Misra took the Bengali literary world by storm upon their publication in the late 1960s. Misra's pieces are more anti-stories than stories, a montage of images that flow into each other and tell a tale with greater power and urgency than narrative fiction. Anti-establishment and revolutionary, these stories by a writer whom many consider to be a cult figure in Bengali literature resonate with truths that are undeniable even today, forty years after they were written.

Comments: (2)

Dorizius
The Golden Gandhi Statue from America is a collection of short stories Subimal Misra and translated from Bengali into English by V. Ramaswamy. The translation is crisp and beautifully fluid. In these short missives, Misra delivers a devastating critique of India's class system and of the gender inequality that is the brutal underbelly of the same. Many of the stories, like the title story, set the extremity of poverty and an crushing nature of "subalternal' life in Calcutta and Bengal against the mythic Indian economic miracle. Each story weaves a narrative of treatment of the poor, and particularly poor women that unremittingly blistering and, indeed as brutal in the stories as it is in reality. While the stories were written in the 1960s and 70s, they represent the struggles of the poor and marginalized in modern India. The book should be required reading for development and human rights students and professionals who dane to think that a "rising tide lifts all boats". Misra's characters are living in the wreckage of a social structure created by unfettered capitalism as a model for progress.
FreandlyMan
Misra's is a voice that is counter to the trends of current Indian literature... A review by Kushanava Choudhury

Subimal Misra may be the most important Bengali writer alive who you have never heard of. For the last 40-odd years Misra has been published exclusively in little magazines. Initially snubbed by mainstream publishing, he has snubbed them back, keeping largely aloof from the literary establishment, but writing, writing, writing. Occasionally he compiles his work into books, which he makes and sells himself, at his own stall in the Little Magazine section of the Kolkata Book Fair. His books are not on sale anywhere on College Street. When I first found out about his work, I tracked down some of his stories at Sandip Dutta's Little Magazine Library, which remains the best (and sometimes only) resource for finding such writers. Misra is roughly of the Hungry generation of counter-establishment writers who emerged in the late 1960s (though he was never a Hungryalist himself). While most of his contemporaries have died, stopped writing, or made peace with their imperfect surroundings, Misra rages on. Without fame or fortune, he keeps writing. In Europe or America, Misra's prose would be on university syllabi (as would the works of the Hungryalists). Students would write PhDs tracing his lineage to Kafka and Borges, comparing his techniques to William Burroughs. Such is our fate that in Bengali, he is unknown even among most readers of contemporary Bangla literature. In V Ramaswamy's subtle translation of Misra's short stories, he final receives the audience and recognition he deserves, in Bengal and beyond.

The stories in The Golden Gandhi Statue from America are Misra's earliest works, from the late 1960s and early 1970s, but the tone is clear. He is at war not only against the literary establishment and literary convention, but the conventions of a self-satisfied society as a whole. His enemy is the belching babu who takes to literature before his Sunday afternoon nap, savouring a sweet story to read in repose. Like Brecht, one of his antecedents, Misra wants his art to unsettle you, to shake you up. The stories, or "anti-stories" as he calls them, largely abandon plot, character and narrative. Rather they more resemble montage or collage, by placing jarring images next to one another for effect. In the title story, the death of a boatman's wife is juxtaposed with the arrival of a Gandhi statue from America. The corpse of Haran Majhi's widow begins to emerge at various points across Calcutta, until ultimately, improbably, the box carrying the new Gandhi statue is opened at Dum Dum airport, and the corpse crops up there too, draped over the imported icon of the father of the nation. In another anti-story, two young men convince a woman to join them for a weekend of debauchery in Digha, and then inexplicably, in the midst of an orgy of sex, booze and gluttony, they rape and then stab her to death. In Uncle Seer, an eccentric saves a young woman from cholera after her community abandons her, and then demands sex in return. The community, which had abandoned the woman, upon hearing Seer's demand, return as a mob and beat him to death. The stories are aphoristic, sometimes fabulist, with the sparsest content or detail. There contain absolutely none of the sentimental social realism or moralizing that permeates much of Bengali Leftist writing. One never feels righteous or pity at the end of a Misra story. He is aiming for something higher.

In these stories you will encounter the dregs of the city's humanity: Robbers, party dadas, wagon-breakers, slave-owners, prostitutes, rapists, and for Misra the worst of all, the middle class babus for whom literature is typically produced. Among South Asian writers, perhaps only Sadat Hasan Manto shares this kind of unrelenting bleakness, this acerbic wit. Too much of Subimal Misra is hard to take at one sitting, and that is the point. If you are looking around and paying attention, too much of this flawed, frayed society should be hard to accept too.

Misra's scope is Kolkata, its drains and its streets, its hooch stills and its tea stalls. He attacks the hypocrisy of all that is middle class and middlebrow without taking shelter in some naïve, and ultimately false idea of the proletariat or the peasant. Misra's position within the Bengali cultural corpus can perhaps be analogised to Ritwik Ghatak's, in producing art which is fundamentally against the bourgeoisie, whose aim is emancipatory, but which does not seek recourse in false and easy sloganeering about the nobility of the poor. Rather he pricks at the idea of moral purity among any group. As Uncle Seer says, when seeking sexual favour: "If a good deed's done, without asking a price/ It's either a lie or an artful device." His Kolkata is a city of destruction and we are all somehow implicated and compromised.

In Bare Bones Awakened, the city ends. Fleeing mobs carry rumours into the countryside that the city has been destroyed by unknown forces. Some say it began when lightning struck the Kalighat temple, others blame the vultures perched on Writers' Buildings, others say hordes of refugees arrived and took over the city from the natives, a Pir has a vision, jackals are heard in Dalhousie, and those who live in skyscrapers claim there are signs of the arrival of tall men carrying Red lanterns. In its destruction, the cityscape is reconstructed in multiverse, as a collage of its myths.

Misra's is a voice that is counter to the trends of current Indian literature - not only in the middlebrow Chetan Bhagat bracket, but even the highbrow English literature whose preoccupations are so removed from the political ferment and social life that congeals at tea stalls and hooch stills across the nation. We are stuck now in a tragic conundrum where we are no longer producing the calibre of writing in Bangla which we had with each generation from the 19th century onward. Mahasweta Devi gave us Nabarun Bhattacharya, and there, with that generation, the line has come to a halt. It is telling that two of the most important writers in Bengali today, are a mother and son, and the latter himself is over 60 years old. Instead, there are now numerous talented writers from Bengal who write in English and the quality of their work is to be prized by all who love literature. The problem is that the latter do not yet share the interests and obsessions of many of their vernacular predecessors. This is not a critique of writing in one language over another -- those debates have been done to death in the past two decades and are largely futile. Rather the shift in language has left gaps in the kind of literature available to us in any language, and therefore in our culture as a whole. We who are the post-Naxal generation, raised during the Red Raj, have nothing to read. What's worse, we have nothing to think. That is why writers like Misra need to be translated. In this moment, we badly need writers who will show us our society in a new way, make us think, and illuminate the way forward.

This is V Ramaswamy's first book of translation. He is a social activist involved in education in Howrah's post-industrial slums, and an omnivorous intellectual. In Subimal Misra he has found, in his own words, "a spiritual kinsman," because the city seen from those jagged Howrah rooftops resembles Misra's Kolkata more than that of anyone else.

The pieces included in this collection are the tip of the dagger of Misra's prose. Misra has been writing for over 40 years, turning his isolation in little magazines into a badge of honour. Ramaswamy has notably brought a reclusive writer's works into the light. If he had done that alone, he would have provided a great service. But the translation is artful, unobtrusive. With this work, he has established himself as one of the premier translators of Bengali anywhere. We hope this is only the beginning of his efforts.

The reviewer teaches at the University of Pennsylvania, USA
This review was published in The Statesman (Kolkata) on 12 December 2010.

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Book Review: Subimal Misra's The Golden Gandhi Statue From America (translated by V. Ramaswamy)

by Sharanya Manivannan, September 20, 2010

Where has Subimal Misra been all these years?

This question recurs to the reader throughout the reading of this masterful collection of the Bengali cult modernist's early stories. And the answer is duly supplied: The Golden Gandhi Statue from America comes with helpful addendums from the author and translator, explaining Misra's views on anti-establishment literature, the reasons he has eschewed all forms of mainstream publication, and what it means to "live the practice (of writing)", as exemplified by Sartre.

As to why the work of a writer so defiantly underground has now been translated into a language as ubiquitous as English and marketed by a distinguished press, a major counter to four decades of dissidence, there is no better answer than the stories themselves. They deserved wider recognition. And as readers in a time of anti-establishmentarianism so fashionable that it becomes co-opted within the same system it claims to oppose, it's eye-opening to see what real anti-establishment literature is.

The world of Misra's characters is a Kolkata underbelly of deviance, madness and the fantastically gruesome. "I feel humiliated to be in the line of litterateurs like Rabindranath Tagore," he complains in the appendix, though it's hardly likely that he will be hung from this same tree. Reading this collection, however, a picture of an entirely different dynasty emerges, populated by current Indian writers of the increasingly popular genre of experimental fiction, and it's arguable that - through a nexus of influence and imitation - Misra may well have been at its source.

Written between 1968 and 1973, these fifteen stories are not for the reader who can't stomach a little rape, a little cholera and a more than ample serving of homicide. But this is hardly the work of a raving mind. These stories are premeditated, thoroughly crafted, carrying all the markings of a writer who reads intently and acknowledges his influences. Misra readily admits inspiration from authors including Dostoevsky and Kafka and the auteurs Eisenstein and Jean-Luc Godard (to whom the book is dedicated).

In "Commentary `71", Kolkata's streets run with blood and the memory of earlier massacres; in "Bare Bones Awakened", the city faces its apocalypse. In "The Naked Knife", the question of exactly what a woman consents to when she holidays with two men is pushed to an almost misogynistic extreme; in "Fairy Girl", a prostitute's corpse is mutilated and enjoyed. The beautiful "The Bird", in which a young man "keeps his heart's sadness within his heart" as he accompanies a band of birdwatchers, ends in a twist that's almost an antithesis to O. Henry. In the stunning "Blood", a battle with mosquitoes turns darkly existentialist. Long before Roberto Bolaño, Misra had captured the disturbing, enigmatic landscape of the counterculture, in a way that is subversive without being pretentious, Indian without being exotic, and somehow both contemporary and classic at once.

One question remains. The publication in English of The Golden Gandhi Statue from America will probably propel Subimal Misra to a celebrity he has derided throughout his career. What will happen then, when his cult becomes conventionally cool?

An edited version appeared in EDEX, The New Indian Express.
The Golden Gandhi Statue From America download epub
Author: Misra Subimal
ISBN: 8172239327
Category: No category
Language: English
Publisher: HarperCollins India (August 30, 2010)
Pages: 192 pages