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Albania and the Albanian identities (Fate of Muslim communities in the Balkans) download epub


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Islam in Albania (1913–1944) was characterised by an increasing secularisation of Albanian society which had begun with Albanian Independence in 1912 carrying on influences from the Albanian National Awakening

Islam in Albania (1913–1944) was characterised by an increasing secularisation of Albanian society which had begun with Albanian Independence in 1912 carrying on influences from the Albanian National Awakening. During the interwar period, new local Muslim institutions such as the Muslim Community of Albania arose that severed ties with the Ottoman Caliphate and placed a focus on localising Islam in Albania.

Following the Albanian National Awakening (Rilindja) tenets and the deemphasizing of religion during the 20th century, the democratic, monarchic later the communist governments followed a systematic dereligionization of the Albanian nation and national culture.

Islam in Albania (1945–1991) covers a period of time when the Albanian Labor Party came to power under Enver Hoxha and exercised almost total control over the Albanian people. The communist government sought to radically overhaul Albanian society by realigning social, cultural and religious loyalties to the communist party through Albanian Nationalism in the pursuit of achieving unitary Albanian identity.

Albanian nationalism (Albania). Albanian nationalism emerged in Albania during the 19th century. By the late Ottoman period Albanians were mainly Muslims with close ties to the Ottoman Empire. The lack of previous Albanian statehood to draw upon resulted in Albanian nationalism developing later unlike neighbouring nationalisms of the Serbs and Greeks

These are the Muslim Community of Albania, which represents ‘official Islam’ (Introduction in this volume), and ‘mainstream’ Sunni Muslims, who are typically accommodationist. I also analyse a Sufi subgroup thereof, which is equally accommodationist, but in a slightly different manner.

These are the Muslim Community of Albania, which represents ‘official Islam’ (Introduction in this volume), and ‘mainstream’ Sunni Muslims, who are typically accommodationist. As a neo-fundamentalist counterpoint, I explore the ideas of a competing organisation composed of Salafi imams. Accommodationism means that the bond between religion and a specific territory and culture of origin is tight.

Both represent the Balkan Muslim populations as a. .

Both represent the Balkan Muslim populations as a homogenous and stable whole’. Religion and Nation According to Muslim and Christian Leaders in Albania, Wiesbaden: Harrossowitz. Funk, J. (2015) ‘Public Expressions of Bosnian Muslim Religiosity and Lived Faith: The Cases of Friday Prayer and the Hijab,’ in Elbasani, A and Roy, O (e. The Revival of Islam in the Balkans: From Identity to Religiosity, Basingstoke: Palgrave Macmillan, pp. 204-222. Ghodsee, K. (2010) Muslim Lives in Eastern Europe.

Many Albanian Albanians also recognize the Kosova declaration of independence from Serbia on July 2.

Many Albanian Albanians also recognize the Kosova declaration of independence from Serbia on July 2, 1990. During the 1920s and 1930s, Albanian men outnumbered Albanian women in the United States by about three to one. Many Albanian men considered their stay in America temporary and therefore left their wives in Albania with the intent of making enough money to return home. The man usually supplied the dowry, which compensated the girl's parents for her fare to the United States.

After the independence of Albania (1912), the national identity of Albanians was fused by this nation-state building .

After the independence of Albania (1912), the national identity of Albanians was fused by this nation-state building process (Draper, 1997) National collective identity in transitional societies: Salience and relations to life satisfaction for youth in South Africa, Albania, Bulgaria, the Czech Republic, Kosovo and Romania. This paper focuses on how Albanian political and Islamic religious figures living in the Balkans have come to interpret the war. I focus on discourse, the ways in which these different agents communicate with their audience, and the wider contexts they evoke.

The goal of this chapter is to examine Albania’s official relationship with Kosovo in the twentieth century. In the interwar period an illiterate and impoverished peasantry were subject to the authoritarian regime of King Zog. Its intention is not to address grass roots attitudes towards Kosovo before the 1990s but simply state policy. We should remember that for the overwhelming majority of the period in question, Albania’s population had virtually no stake in the political process

As for the question of self-identification among the minority, the Turks have always aimed at living as "Greek citizens of Turkish descent and of Muslim religion" on their lands and did not develop so far any nationalistic claims so far, such as annexation of Western Thrace to Turkey. One reason for this is that Greece is economically a better place than the other side of the frontier. However, the third largest Muslim minority is not the Gypsy community but the Torbesh population, a devout Muslim community registered as Macedonian because their mother tongue is the Macedonian.


Albania and the Albanian identities (Fate of Muslim communities in the Balkans) download epub
ISBN: 9548872269
Category: No category
Language: English
Publisher: International Center for Minority Studies and Intercultural Relations; 1st edition (2000)