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You Will Never Be the Same (Medallion SF, S1894) download epub

by Cordwainer Smith


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Cordwainer Smith had a vision of the future that created a legen in his lifetime-the universe of the Instrumentality of Man, of Norstrilia, of the Underpeople and their heroine C'Mell, of the Scanners--a vision shot through with the truth of poetry and prophecy.

Cordwainer Smith had a vision of the future that created a legen in his lifetime-the universe of the Instrumentality of Man, of Norstrilia, of the Underpeople and their heroine C'Mell, of the Scanners--a vision shot through with the truth of poetry and prophecy. This classic collection includes such famous stories as "The Lady Who Sailed The Soul," "The Game of Rat and Dragon," "Alpha Ralpha Boulevard," and "Scanners Live in Vain"--landmarks of imaginative writing. Genre: Literary Fiction

You Will Never Be the Same (Medallion SF, S1894).

You Will Never Be the Same (Medallion SF, S1894). Personally I think the reader is advised to read the full length Norstrilia first, and only read these if you have a significant interest in all things Cordwainer Smith.

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Be the first to ask a question about You Will Never Be The Same. Lists with This Book. This book is not yet featured on Listopia. No one before or since has written like Cordwainer Smith: the strange, soaring stories, with their hints of even further unglimpsed depths and wonders, were one of the delights of my youthful exploration of SF, and are a recurring source of pleasure even now.

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Linebarger's identity as "Cordwainer Smith" was secret until his death. 1963, You Will Never Be The Same (collection of short sf stories). "Cordwainer" is an archaic word for "a worker in cordwain or cordovan leather; a shoemaker", and a "smith" is "one who works in iron or other metals; esp. a blacksmith or farrier": two kinds of skilled workers with traditional materials  . 1965, Space Lords (short sf stories).

You Will Never Be the Same.

Cordwainer Smith is a psuedonym for Paul M. A. Linebarger. He also wrote books under other psuedonyms, which have not been included here. I am currently missing only the following two books. The Insturmentality of Mankind. I also do not have the two books listed under the section "Books about Cordwainer Smith". The concordance especially looks interesting.

Great collection of stories by one of the giants of the genre. Very Good.

Comments: (3)

Fearlesssinger
You Will Never Be The Same - Cordwainer Smith (Paul Linebarger 1913-66) [2014-04-02 516 SF]

"We were drunk with happiness in those early years. Everyone was, especially the young people. These were the first years of the rediscovery of Man, when the Instrumentality dug deep in the treasury reconstructing the old cultures, the old languages, and even old troubles." from "Alpha Ralpha Boulevard" by Cordwainer Smith.

This book "You Will Never be the Same" (1963) by Cordwainer Smith has, in my estimation, the singular distinction of being the only collection of science fiction stories whose title accurately describes the effect it will have on the reader. As the book states on the back cover: "Read them and YOU WILL NEVER BE THE SAME." Smith's vision on the future, introduced in these stories and further developed in others, is a mesmerizing prologue to a fully realized alternate future call the Instrumentality of Mankind.

Smith's first published science-fiction book consists of nine stories all previously published in magazines 1948-1961. All stories are part of The Instrumentality of Mankind future.

No, No, Not Rogov! (1959) - short story - first published IF Magazine February 1959
A secret experiment in Stalin's Russia drives scientist insane with the visions of the far, far future.

The Lady Who Sailed the Soul (1960) - novelette by Cordwainer Smith and Genevieve Linebarger [as by Cordwainer Smith] - Galaxy Magazine, April 1960.
The story of planoforming sailors - Go-Captains - Helen American and Mr. Grey-no-more - a love story of a kind.

Scanners Live in Vain - (1950) - Fantasy Book, January 1950
Scanners - ships from the Up-and-Out - the Great Pain of Space - Year One of Space - Instrumentality - a Scanner breaks ranks.

The Game of Rat and Dragon (1955) - short story - Galaxy Magazine, April 1955
Pinlighting - planoform - Chiefs of the Instrumentality - Up-and-Out - Captain Wow - Father Moontree - Go-Captain - how the Dragons are defeated.

The Burning of the Brain (1958) - short story - IF Magazine, October 1958
The story of Go Captain of the Wu-Feinstein and his insane wife Delores Oh - Stop Captains - Planoforming - Pinlighting

Golden the Ship Was - Oh! Oh! Oh! - (1959) • short story by Cordwainer Smith and Genevieve Linebarger - Amazing, April 1959
War with the Raumsog came about twenty years after the great Cat Scandal - Lords of the Instrumentality - Golden Ship - Go-Captains - Prince Loveaduck - Old North Australian - santaclara drug

Alpha Ralpha Boulevard - (1961) • novelette - Magazine of Fantasy and Science Fiction, June 1961
The Rediscovery of Man - Lord Jestocost - Old Common Tongue - Downdeep-downdeep - C'meel - Cat people - Abba dingo

Mark Elf (1957) - short story - Saturn, May 1957
An indestructible machine and a girl from the distant past resolve the riddle of the Sixth German Reich- Manshonyaggers - Kaskaskia Effect

Highly recommended for anyone with an interest in one of the treasures of science fiction.
mym Ђудęm ęгσ НuK
No one before or since has written like Cordwainer Smith: the strange, soaring stories, with their hints of even further unglimpsed depths and wonders, were one of the delights of my youthful exploration of SF, and are a recurring source of pleasure even now.

Unfortunately Smith was ill-served by his early publishers: his one longish novel (Norstrilia) was hacked into two parts (The Planet Buyer and The Underpeople), and the short stories (which originally appeared in magazines like Fantasy & Science Fiction ) were splattered around different compilations at random.

Now Norstrilia has been restored and published intact, and all 33 shorts have all been collected into one properly-edited volume: The Rediscovery of Man (N.B. NOT the abridged Gollancz paperback of the same title).

This slim volume might reasonably be described as a sampler, and contains the following:

• No, No, Not Rogov!
• The Lady Who Sailed The Soul
• Scanners Live in Vain
• The Game of Rat and Dragon
• The Burning of the Brain
• Golden the Ship Was — Oh! Oh! Oh!
• Alpha Ralpha Boulevard
• Mark Elf

The flyleaf displays the interesting statement: "The chapters in this book originally appeared as magazine pieces and have been specially revised for inclusion here", with an acknowledgment to Robert Silverberg.
Tori Texer
_You Will Never Be the Same_ (1963) is the title of Cordwainer Smith's first collection, and for once the title was not an instance of a publisher making empty noises. The reader will be entering a distant future world with strange place names like the Up-and-Out, Old North Australia, Alpha Ralpha Boulevard, and Raumsog. Some of the characters are Scanners, Pinlighters, a planoform Go-Captain, a fiery cat girly-girl, robot doctors, and a Mark Elf. The whole business is run by the Instrumentality, which at one time was headed by by Lord Wait but later by Lord Jesticost and Lady Alice More.

And Smith's people do really strange things. One of them says at one point: "I must cranch. I have to cranch" (55). A Lord of the Instrumentality casually admits that he "recieved six ounces of stroon in pure form" (121) as a bribe. Smith refers to a child playing with a spieltier: "She got tired of letting it be a chicken, so she reversed it into the fur-bearing position" (29). On page 120, Smith mentions in passing "the great Cat Scandal which, for a while, threatened to cut the entire planet Earth from the desperately essential santaclara drug" (120). At another point, the Lords of the Instrumentality plan to use a Golden Ship. What is cranching? What is stroon? What is a spieltier? What is the great Cat Scandal? What is the Golden Ship and how does it operate? Often, you can figure out the answer through the context of the story. Sometimes, I will confess, things only become clearer in the context of later stories (like "The Ballad of Lost C'Mell," "Drunkboat," and "The Boy Who Bought Old Earth").

Smith uses several techniques to plunge us into his bizarre future world. One is to tumble us into a series of wild and wooly historical events:

I myself was the first man to put a postage stamp on a letter after fourteen thousand years. I took Virginia to hear the first piano recital. We watched at the eye-machine when cholera was released in Tasmania, and we saw Tasmanians dancing in the streets, now that they did not have to be protected anymore. Everywhere, things became exciting. Everywhere, men and women worked with a wild will to build a more imperfect world.
I myself went into a hospital and came out French. ("Alpha Ralpha Boulevard," 130)

Another technique (used by Smith in a number of his tales) is to _appear_ to tell the whole story right at the begining:

The story ran-- how did the story run? Everyone knew the reference to Helen America and Mr. Grey-no-more, but no one knew exactly how it happened. Their names were welded to the glittering timeless jewelery of romance. Sometimes they were compared to Heloise and Abelard, whose story had been found among books in a long-buried library. Other ages were to compare their life with the weird, ugly-lovely story of the Go-Captain Taliano and the lady Dolores Oh. ("The Lady Who Sailed the _Soul_," 28)

But with Smith, the story first revealed, the story "everybody knows," is only the tip of the iceberg. The real story is the details hidden below the depths. We quickly realize that Smith has given away nothing in the telling of his tale. Not at the begining.

A third technique is for Smith to thrust the reader into an almost alien point-of-view:

Martel did not hear her. All his boxes had swung over toward _Alarm_, some to _Danger_. He fought against the roar of his own mind, forcing his body into excess excitement. How easy it was to be a Scanner when you really stood outside your body, haberman-fashion, and looked back into it with your eyes alone. Then you could manage the body, rule it coldly even in the enduring agony of Space. But to realize that you _were_ a body, that this thing was ruling you, that the mind could kick the flesh and send it roaring into panic! That was bad. ("Scanners Live in Vain," 59)

There are eight stories in all: "No, No, Not Rogov!" (_If_, 1958), "The Lady Who Sailed the _Soul_" (_Galaxy_, 1960), "Scanners Live in Vain" (_Fantasy Book_, 1948), "The Game of Rat and Dragon" (_Galaxy_, 1955), "The Burning of the Brain" (_If_, 1958), "Golden the Ship Was-- Oh! Oh! Oh!" (_Fantastic_, 1959), "Alpha Ralpha Boulevard" (_Fantasy and Science Fiction_, 1961), and "Mark Elf" (_Saturn_, 1957).

The first and last tales have roots in our own time. The first deals with a pair of devoted husband and wife Russian scientists hard at work on a rather horrific espianage machine. But instead of tapping the brain of Eisenhower, they get a golden vision of the future that brings about madness and death to the Communist Russians.

The second story is about a teenaged German girl girl sent up in a rocket in 1945 to escape from the Nazis and the Red Army. She comes down thousands of years later. What follows is not a retelling of Buck Rogers, but rather a phantasmagoric fairy tale-- part Three Bears, part Brothers Grimm, part Troll, and part handsome Prince. Like the porridge, it comes out just right.

The middle six stories take us directly into Smith's distant future. "The Lady Who Sailed the _Soul_" is a heroic love story from the days when brave space sailors ferried passengers in suspended animation to distant colonies via solar sailing ships. "Alpha Ralpha Boulevard" is a tragic love story from a later time when humanity is going through the chaos of becoming nonregimented once more. In it, we meet for the first time the cat girl C'Mell, who will appear in later tales. "The Burning of the Brain" might be said to be a love story as well-- but a curiously one-sided affair. Sadly, there are relationships like that of the brave Go-Captain Taliano and the proud Dolores Oh even today.

"Scanners Live in Vain" is an adventure of early cyborg spacers running amok on a single night. What makes it extraordinary is that Smith places you into their skins. You sense what they sense. You think what they think. You feel what they feel. And it is not quite human. "The Game of Rat and Dragon" is a war story in which pinlighters and their feline Partners battle aliens in space (pecieved as dragons) in lightning-fast warfare. Why are these heroes hated by so many at home? "Golden the Ship Was-- Oh! Oh! Oh!" is about the superweapon launched by the Instrumentality against a powerful enemy. It might be considered a retelling of the Trojan Horse story. It might also be relevant to note that in real life, Smith was an expert on psychological warfare.

_You Will Never Be the Same_ is clearly a classical collection of science fiction.
You Will Never Be the Same (Medallion SF, S1894) download epub
Author: Cordwainer Smith
ISBN: 0425018946
Category: No category
Language: English
Publisher: Berkley Books; 1st edition (September 1, 1970)