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Old money: A play download epub

by Wendy Wasserstein


Epub Book: 1318 kb. | Fb2 Book: 1851 kb.

Old Money is no exception. An American Daughter has the energy, emotional weight and sharp satire that Wendy Wasserstein is loved fo. -USA Today.

Old Money is no exception. This is a comedy of manners the kind of play that is funny if the manners are bad enough. It is set in fashionable Manhattan during the Gilded Age and in the same place in our own more drab time, with both sets of characters played by the same actors. Here we observe how money changes a family over time. PRAISE FOR THE SISTERS ROSENSWEIG "Warm and wise, engrossing and endearing. -The Wall Street Journal.

Wendy Wasserstein was born in Brooklyn, New York on October 18, 1950. She received an undergraduate degree from Mount Holyoke College, an . at City College of New York and a . at Yale University's School of Drama. A one-act play not only served as her . thesis but became the basis for her successful full-length work, Uncommon Women and Others (1977). Her other plays include Isn't It Romantic, The Sisters Rosensweig, and Old Money.

Start by marking Old Money: A Play as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read. by Wendy Wasserstein.

A dinner party in an ornate mansion on the fashionable Upper East Side of Manhattan provides the scene for this witty and incisive play. A dinner party in an ornate mansion on the fashionable Upper East Side of Manhattan provides the scene for this witty and incisive play. Set in two eras-the early 1900s and our own Gilded Age-the characters move effortlessly from one period to the other. The host, a contemporary master of high-risk arbitrage, steps in and out of character as a robber baron of an earlier time. Poking fun at members of the American aristocracy is easy, but Wasserstein also makes us care about them as people. Old Money is no exception.

Wendy Wasserstein (October 18, 1950 – January 30, 2006) was an American playwright. She was an Andrew Dickson White Professor-at-Large at Cornell University

Wendy Wasserstein (October 18, 1950 – January 30, 2006) was an American playwright. She was an Andrew Dickson White Professor-at-Large at Cornell University. She received the Tony Award for Best Play and the Pulitzer Prize for Drama in 1989 for her play The Heidi Chronicles.

In Old Money, Wasserstein deftly observes how social conventions, professional eminence and familial relationships . Presented at Lincoln Center in 2000, Old Money was one of Wasserstein's last and most mature plays.

In Old Money, Wasserstein deftly observes how social conventions, professional eminence and familial relationships have changed (little) and remained the same (largely) for over a century. Curtain Up called the play an "adroitly constructed dual universe - clever and entertaining. Playing now through August 17, 2014. Visit ww. ossvalleyplayers. com for more information.

Wendy Wasserstein, who spoke for a generation of smart, driven but sometimes unsatisfied women in a series of popular plays that included the long-running Pulitzer Prize winner ''The Heidi Chronicles,'' died yesterday at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center in Manhattan.

Wendy Wasserstein, who spoke for a generation of smart, driven but sometimes unsatisfied women in a series of popular plays that included the long-running Pulitzer Prize winner ''The Heidi Chronicles,'' died yesterday at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Center in Manhattan Wendy Wasserstein, who spoke for a generation of smart, driven but sometimes unsatisfied women in a series of popular plays that included the long-running Pulitzer Prize winner ''The Heidi Chronicles,'' died yesterday at Memorial Sloan-Kettering Cancer Ce. .

by. Wasserstein, Wendy. Books for People with Print Disabilities. Internet Archive Books.

Old Money is a play written by Wendy Wasserstein . The play is "a comedy of manners, one that examines the theme of materialism. Every so often an unexpected surge of emotional current electrifies Old Money, touching on feelings that range from the loneliness that follows the death of a family member to the anger that propels an outsider who wants in. But these eruptions subside all too quickly. What we're left with as we contemplate the lucre-worshipers of today and yesterday is a surface comparison of worlds defined by surfaces.

A dinner party in an ornate mansion on the fashionable Upper East Side of Manhattan provides the scene for this witty and incisive play. Set in two eras--the early 1900s and our own Gilded Age--the characters move effortlessly from one period to the other. The host, a contemporary master of high-risk arbitrage, steps in and out of character as a robber baron of an earlier time. His guests of today include a Hollywood director, a not-so-cutting-edge sculptor, an online lingerie designer, an aggressive publicist, and an aging historian. Their counterparts from the past are the great man's rebellious son, a grand dame of New York society, the architect who built the mansion originally, and the maids and servants who maintain it.In this dance of rich storytelling and social commentary, it becomes strikingly clear that while old money has become new, little else has changed over the years. Children still rebel against their controlling parents, women still hope for love, and greed, snobbery, and angst persist.

Comments: (2)

Olelifan
"Old Money" might be a great play when you see it but it certainly doesn't come across as one when you read it. Set physically in a mansion in New York, temporally it jumps back and forth from the days of WWI to the end of the 20th century. Both story lines are occurring during a summertime party. Each actor plays a role in the contemporary story and another one in the historical plot. While times may change people stay the same, the `in' crowd tries to keep their underlings down be it those without money (modern times) or those without breeding (the past). Youth rebels against age and non-conformists must be shown the error of their ways.
Sounds confusing? Don't worry it isn't just you, it really is confusing. This is a nifty idea that was badly written in the play and comes of as a theatrical trick more than as a telling reminder of the stability of human nature. The fact that one character actually knows the people from both eras and often talks to the past while in the present is even more annoying. Sometime the people from the present respond as if they were in the past and some times they just seem confused themselves.
All in all I read the pay but I would not suggest that anyone else do the same.
the monster
There are two storylines in this play, both set at an old mansion in Manhattan. One occurs in the present (they're putting on a party at the mansion), the other occurs in the early 1900s. The people in the present are supposedly rude and unrefined, those in the past are portrayed as better bred, etc. Both stories are about the same old family and could be said to be woven together because scenes from each occur side by side and the characters in each are played by the same actors.
Most of the plays I read are in French, so I was interested in sticking my nose into an American drama. Unfortunately, I chose OLD MONEY. I don't know how this play would come across when acted out, but on paper it is totally confusing and yawn inspiring. People from the past hop on stage to chat with people in the present, but wait -- perhaps they're also in the past. Or they're in both the past and the present. Or neither. But take heart, it often appears that the characters themselves don't know -- they ask each other, "Are you really here?"
Well, dear reader, I no longer am, and I strongly suggest that you don't show up in the first place.
Old money: A play download epub
Author: Wendy Wasserstein
ISBN: 0573627932
Category: No category
Language: English
Publisher: S. French; First edition (2002)
Pages: 74 pages