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Air Raid: Bombing of Coventry, 1940 download epub

by Norman Longmate


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The Coventry Blitz (blitz: from the German word Blitzkrieg meaning "lightning war" listen ) was a series of bombing raids that took place on the English city of Coventry.

The Coventry Blitz (blitz: from the German word Blitzkrieg meaning "lightning war" listen ) was a series of bombing raids that took place on the English city of Coventry. The city was bombed many times during the Second World War by the German Air Force (Luftwaffe). The most devastating of these attacks occurred on the evening of 14 November 1940 and continued into the morning of 15 November.

Author:Longmate, Norman. Air Raid: Bombing of Coventry, 1940. Each month we recycle over . million books, saving over 12,500 tonnes of books a year from going straight into landfill sites. All of our paper waste is recycled and turned into corrugated cardboard. Read full description. Air RAID The Bombing of Coventry 1940 Good 0091279003. Pre-owned: lowest price.

Coventry was that city the night of November 14, 1940. At 8:15, the bombs were falling across the city. All night long the city burned and her Cathedral burned with her, emblem of the eternal truth that, when men suffer, God suffers with them. The fire watch team at the Cathedral called for fire equipment- it was all in use. When that arrived, the mains faltered and quit flowing. All night long the city burned and her Cathedral burned with her, emblem of the eternal truth that, when men suffer, God suffers with them 568 killed, 863 seriously injured and 393 lightly injured. The total casualty figure was therefore 1824, or 1431 if the 'lightly injured', . those able to go home after treatment, were excluded.

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History, Bombardment, 1940-1941. Bombardment, 1940-1941.

Norman Longmate (15 December 1925 – 4 June 2016) was an English author and social and military historian. Air Raid: the Bombing of Coventry, 1940 (Hutchinson) 1976, (Arrow Books) 1978, (David McKay, New York) 1978. He was educated at Christ's Hospital and Worcester College, Oxford, where he read Modern History. Author of 31 books, and of various radio documentaries, he often worked as a historical adviser on TV programmes, including the BAFTA-award winning How We Used to Live. When We Won the War: the Story of Victory in Europe, 1945 (Hutchinson) 1977. The Doodlebugs: the Story of the Flying Bombs (Hutchinson) 1981, (Arrow Books) 1986.

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ISBN 13. 9780091279004. Air Raid: The Bombing Of Coventry, 1940. More books from Norman Longmate. How We Lived Then: A History of Everyday Life During the Second World War. ISBN 13. Norman Longmate. If Britain Had Fallen: The Real Nazi Occupation Plans.


Comments: (2)

Nilarius
It's the only book that covers the subject to my knowlegde. As such it's good. I'd like to have some more material
from the german perspective; crewreports etc. This raid was a precursor; pathfinding, targetmarking and beam-
navigation. The RAF (Bomber Command) would later use the same techniques ; pathfinding, targetmarking and
Oboe(navigation). Thanks to Norman Longmate!
Beydar
It was simple- compile a list of targets with out-moded fire protection. Load the Heinkels and Junkers with incendiaries. Broadcast two radio beams that cross above a city, sending the most experienced crews to 'light up' the intersection first. By then, average crews would see the fires and unload also. Coventry was that city the night of November 14, 1940.
At 8:15, the bombs were falling across the city. The fire watch team at the Cathedral called for fire equipment- it was all in use. When that arrived, the mains faltered and quit flowing. From 11:00 onward, men watched helplessly:
'...High explosives were falling continually... The whole interior was a seething mass of flame and piled up blazing beams and timbers, interpenetrated and surmounted with dense bronze-coloured smoke. Through this could be seen the concentrated blaze caused by the burning of the organ, famous back to the time when Handel played on it...Burning masses of timber from the roof of the Mercers' Chapel filled the chapel itself and burst through the door into the vestry. The fire could be seen finding its way from vestry to vestry, till they were all ablaze....
All night long the city burned and her Cathedral burned with her, emblem of the eternal truth that, when men suffer, God suffers with them.' (p. 95)
Statistics during a brutal war are cold:
' ...568 killed, 863 seriously injured and 393 lightly injured. The total casualty figure was therefore 1824, or 1431 if the 'lightly injured', i.e. those able to go home after treatment, were excluded. In a population of 238,400 about one person in every 166 had been killed or badly hurt and one in 130 had been a casualty of some kind, though as so many people had moved out following earlier raids or had spent the night outside the city the risk for those actually in Coventry during the raid was at least double these proportions. The corresponding ratio for deaths or serious injuries for the whole civilian population of the United Kingdom for the whole war was one in 272, i.e. a civilian had a 60 per cent greater chance of being killed or seriously wounded during that one night in Coventry than during the whole six years of the war elsewhere. ' (p. 190)
There are good appendices, one refuting claims made in two books that intelligence intercepts (ULTRA) knew of the attack in advance, but that Churchill refused to inform Civil Defense out of concern for secrecy. In brief:
The Germans planned three attacks during the full-moon period of November, each with a code name, no more. The official Air Staff predictions were London or an area Farnborough-Maidenhead-Reading. And what could defenders accomplish? Orbit squadrons of day-fighters around each city? (On the 14th, they reported 49 radar equipped night-fighter and 72 visual fighter sorties, resulting in 20 sightings /2 engagements /1 enemy damaged). 40 anti-aircraft guns were functioning during the attack by 330 bombers.
Eventually, British bombers were equipped with receivers to backtrack the beams and bomb the transmitter towers, but it is easier to do on the ground whilst driving a tank.
Does this episode justify the later RAF attacks on German cities? Only the survivors are entitled to judge.
Air Raid: Bombing of Coventry, 1940 download epub
Author: Norman Longmate
ISBN: 0099208504
Category: No category
Language: English
Publisher: Arrow Bks.; n.e. edition (November 19, 1979)
Pages: 302 pages