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Victorine download epub

by Catherine Texier


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Catherine Texier, novelist, journalist, and creative writing professor, was born and raised in France and now lives in New York City.

Catherine Texier, novelist, journalist, and creative writing professor, was born and raised in France and now lives in New York City. She is the author of four novels, Victorine (2004), Chloé l’Atlantique (1983), Love Me Tender (1987) and Panic Blood (1990), and a memoir, Breakup (1999).

FREE shipping on qualifying offers. In 1899, Victorine Texier abandons her small French village, her husband, and her two young children to follow her lover to Indochina. She has fallen for Antoine.

In 1899, Victorine Texier abandons her small French village, her husband, and her two young children to follow her . Catherine Texier is the author of four novels, Chloé l’Atlantique, Love Me Tender, Panic Blood, and Victorine, and a memoir, Breakup.

In 1899, Victorine Texier abandons her small French village, her husband, and her two young children to follow her lover to Indochina  . About Catherine Texier.

In this lush, lyrical, and marvelously evocative novel, Catherine Texier takes a mystery from her family’s past and draws from it a portrait of a remarkable woman-her great-grandmother Victorine.

In this lush, lyrical, and marvelously evocative novel, Catherine Texier. In this lush, lyrical, and marvelously evocative novel, Catherine Texier takes a mystery from her family’s past and draws from it a portrait of a remarkable woman-her great-grandmother Victorine. A young schoolteacher in a quiet province in France, Victorine had married and had two children.

Victorine by Catherine Texier. Ancestors, adultery and oceans of passion. The novel comes out of a gap, Texier tells us, in her own background

Victorine by Catherine Texier. By Michÿle Roberts. The novel comes out of a gap, Texier tells us, in her own background. She knew that her ancestor, Victorine, had run away from home in France to what the French colonialists called Indochina, leaving no trace in family history apart from murmured gossip, or the thundering silence of outraged provincials. Texier set herself to reimagine that woman's crisis. Texier places her heroine's quandary within the parameters of family genealogy. This narrows her scope but makes for a crisply told, rattling good tale. Victorine grows up in the Vendée in north-west France. She has fallen for Antoine, her childhood sweetheart, and when his work sends him to Asia she is compelled to go with him, and to leave everything she knows behind.

Discover Book Depository's huge selection of Catherine Texier books online. Free delivery worldwide on over 20 million titles. Notify me. Victorine. Their five weeks together onboard the ship to Indochina are a kind of honeymoon, a prelude to their liberation in a sultry new world of frangipani trees and monsoons

Catherine Texier is the author of four novels, Chloé l'Atlantique, Panic Blood, Love Me Tender, and Victorine, and a. .Texier has taught creative writing at Hofstra University, Rutgers University, and the New School. She lives in New York City.

Catherine Texier is the author of four novels, Chloé l'Atlantique, Panic Blood, Love Me Tender, and Victorine, and a memoir, Breakup, which was featured on Oprah. Her novel Victorine won ELLE Magazine’s 2004 Readers’ Prize for Fiction.


Comments: (7)

Jia
From the summary provided on the back describing the main character as "a remarkable woman" and the story as one of "adventure and self-discovery - of a woman's struggle between duty and independence, tradition and freedom, longing and regret," I expected much more than is given in Victorine. I expected the main character, Victorine, to be stronger and more purposeful in her actions. Instead, the novel gives us a character who is confused, afraid to face her reality and responsibility as a mother, and living a life behind secrets.

Victorine marries young after becoming pregnant. She ends up having two children and a husband who openly sleeps with other women. She doesn't seem to be happy with her life, but it isn't explicitly stated as such in the novel. Then she gets caught up in a steamy romance with a man who asks her to come with him to Indochina. At first she says yes but then says she's not sure, then tells him if she shows up for the voyage, it means she's decided to join him. She does join him and in order to leave her family, she gets them all out of the house and then disappears - no note, no warning, nothing. The novel continues to detail Victorine's life from that point.

The novel uses a style that jumps between 1940 and the late 1800's and early 1900's. It was not apparent to me why the author felt it necessary to present the story in this manner. I found it to be mostly distracting, and it wasn't until more than halfway through the novel that it became easier to follow, like a rhythm had finally been developed. The author also chooses to trace the passage of time by specific dates, the drawback with this method is that unless a reader has an extremely good memory or is willing to flip back to see what the last date was, it's hard to keep track of how much time has passed.

The prologue and afterword, I believe, are included because the inspiration for the story came from a mystery involving the author's great-grandmother who had abandoned her family and was rumored to have gone off to Indochina with a customs officer for a few years before returning to her family in France. However, other than having been the cause of inspiration, I don't see why the prologue and afterword were included. They don't have anything to do with the fictional story of Victorine.
Gerceytone
Not being a fan of contemporary, popular fiction, this is not a book I would normally have selected. It was one among many I received, so I read it not really knowing what to expect. Unfortunately the most noticeable aspect of the book was that it was pieced together in a distracting way. Although by the end one is used to it, the timeline of the story jumps around excessively to the point that it is not simple to follow at what point the characters do various things, making it too easy to forget what is going on. Despite being based very loosely on actual events (the author is imagining what perhaps transpired in her great-grandmother's life), and though readable and somewhat entertaining, the book does not make a particular "impression" or connection. The dubious heroine of the novel, Victorine, does not make choices that make sense to me as a reader, or at least the reasoning behind her choices (whether logical or not) is not clear. Victorine's choice to leave her husband and two children behind to pursue adventure and love in Indochina does not seem remarkably agonizing, painful or difficult. Although there are passages hinting at her ambivalence, the book does not delve into Victorine's mind or feelings at a level that can persuade the reader to understand what she has chosen for herself. It is never entirely clear that her desire for adventure and love was so strong that it would propel her to make a reckless choice like leaving her family behind. Nor was it entirely clear that she had any great love for the two children she abandoned, although she returned to them eventually. Somehow, her choices and feelings seemed hollow and artificial in a way that, for example, Anna Karenina's did not (Anna Karenina of course being literature's greatest unfaithful wife and mother). The most truthful aspect of this book, in my estimation, is the idiocy of French bureaucracy, as the government first offers Victorine's lover Antoine a promotion while at the same time informing him that they cannot tender a renewal of his employment contract.
Winail
this novel is not your typical love story, where we follow the heroine down a predictable path in order to achieve happiness in the standard sense. Victorine is a torn women who sacrifices something dear to her, with the goal of escaping her mediocre and monotonous life. The result is a tumultuous ride through an exotic land, ending not as you might think. The book is phenonmenal, if not just for the crafty prose, than for the mere fact that the author takes a huge risk: She gives us a main character whose actions we might not agree with, but makes us root for her regardless. The tale is extraordinary, but there is a certain sensibilty to this book that undeniably conveys the angst that comes from the human condition. Read this book, it will leave you with a poignant, yet fresh perspective on life.
Mr.Savik
this novel is a beautifully written story, based in part on the author's great grandmother, who, in 1899 leaves her family to go to indochina with another man with whom she falls in love. this is a wonderful love story that combines the lifestyles and times of france and indochina. it is written in three distinct timeframes, which add texture and reflection to this remarkable woman.
this is a sensually written novel, one that every woman i know will enjoy reading. i highly recommend this book.
Darkraven
I don't have nothing to add to other reviewers you review this book, expect the 1st one. I totally disagree because she did the review the day it came out and just read the editorial reviews and based her review on that or read the book fast. I bought the book when it came out, but finish it last night and loved it. I felt book was much better then the 1st reviewer thought it was. Hope this has success and maybe a it will be a movie as well. Thank you.
Victorine download epub
Author: Catherine Texier
ISBN: 0670915068
Category: No category
Language: English
Publisher: Penguin/Viking; 1st Edition/1st Printing edition (2004)