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The Life of Irne Nmirovsky: 1903-1942. Olivier Philipponnat, Patrick Lienhardt download epub

by Olivier Philipponnat


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The life of Irène Némirovsky, 1903-1942. Olivier Philipponnat, Patrick Lienhardt, Euan Cameron.

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Olivier Philipponnat, Patrick Lienhardt as Want to Read . The book tells about her life but in a way that it is relevant for understanding her books. It's amazing how much she achieved in the years 1929 - 1943.

Olivier Philipponnat, Patrick Lienhardt as Want to Read: Want to Read savin. ant to Read.

Olivier Philipponnat and Patrick Lienhardt are the authors of an acclaimed biography of Roger Stéphane. Библиографические данные. The Life of Irene Nemirovsky: 1903-1942.

Olivier Philipponnat (Author), Patrick Lienhardt (Author), Euan Cameron (Translator) & 0 more. French biographers Philipponnat and Lienhardt draw on heretofore unexamined archives to present the turbulent, tragic life of Irène Némirovsky, author of the posthumous bestseller Suite Française. Némirovsky (1903–1942) lived through two great persecutions of the 20th century: the pogroms of her native Kiev and Odessa and, having fled Russia for France after the Russian revolution, the Holocaust.

French biographers Philipponnat and Lienhardt draw on heretofore unexamined archives to present the turbulent, tragic life .

French biographers Philipponnat and Lienhardt draw on heretofore unexamined archives to present the turbulent, tragic life of Irène Némirovsky, author of the posthumous bestseller Suite Française. As WWII raged, with the Germans' relentless oppression of so-called stateless people, her conversion to Catholicismdid not save her.

Author: Olivier Philipponnat and Patrick Lienhardt. Irene Nemirovskys own life was as dramatic as any fiction. She was born in 1903 in Kiev to a well off Jewish family. Read full description. See details and exclusions. The Life of Irene Nemirovsky: 1903-1942 by Olivier Philipponnat, Patrick Lienhardt (Paperback, 2011). Brand new: lowest price.

Irène Némirovsky (French: ; 24 February 1903 – 17 August 1942) was a novelist of Ukrainian Jewish origin born in Kiev Ukraine under the Russian Empire; she lived more than half her life in France, and wrote in French, but was denied.

Irène Némirovsky (French: ; 24 February 1903 – 17 August 1942) was a novelist of Ukrainian Jewish origin born in Kiev Ukraine under the Russian Empire; she lived more than half her life in France, and wrote in French, but was denied French citizenship.

And in July 1942 Némirovsky was arrested and deported to Auschwitz, where she died the following month.

Read unlimited books and audiobooks on the web, iPad, iPhone and Android. But the story of her own life was no less dramatic and moving than her most powerful fiction. With her family, she escaped Russia in 1919 and settled in Paris, where she met and married fellow Jewish émigré Michel Epstein. In 1929 she published her highly acclaimed and controversial novel David Golder, the first of many successful books that established her stellar reputation. And in July 1942 Némirovsky was arrested and deported to Auschwitz, where she died the following month.

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Irene Nemirovsky's own life was as dramatic as any fiction. Few writers enjoy posthumous success as astonishing as hers after the international triumph of "Suite Francaise". She was born in 1903 in Kiev to a well-off Jewish family, but died in Auschwitz only 39 years later. With her parents she fled the Russian Revolution, eventually settling in France. With the publication of "David Golder" in 1929 - delivered to a publisher just before the birth of her first daughter - Irene swiftly became an acclaimed and successful writer. When France fell to the Nazis, Irene and her family took refuge in a small Burgundy village, where she finished two more novels and began "Suite Francaise". Finally, in July 1942 Irene was arrested by the French police and deported. Her biographers take advantage of access to diaries, unpublished documents and surviving family to examine Irene's remarkable life, from pogroms in Ukraine to gilded holidays in Biarritz, and her troubled relationship with her vain, difficult mother. The result is a brilliant portrait of an exceptional writer and of a turbulent period of European history.

Comments: (7)

Drelajurus
After reading several of Irène Némirovsky's intense novels, I was eager to know more about her. There is no more comprehensive and authoritative source of information than this biography. The authors are clearly passionate about her work and fascinated by her remarkable life. "I never knew peaceful times," Nemirovsky said on a radio show. "I've always lived in anxiety and often in danger."

Because Némirovsky's characters and plots were inspired by her own life, it's especially rewarding to learn about her family, the circles she moved in and the political turmoil she saw first hand.

Irène Némirovsky lived through many incarnations: she was a pampered rich girl in the twilight of Tsarist Russia, a refugee fleeing the Bolsheviks with her family, a flapper in Paris in the roaring twenties, a devoted wife and mother, a boldly Jewish writer, a thoroughly French writer, a convert to Catholicism and a victim of the Holocaust. All of these facets of Némirovsky are richly described by the authors.

And we get a detailed picture of Némirovsky's heartless, vain, lascivious mother - the source of so many of the novelist's monstrous female villains.

Quite a few of Némirovsky's novels and stories are out of print or unavailable in English. The authors of this biography, however, describe them all, even the "potboilers" she turned out when desperate for money. Readers who want a complete look at her work will find it here. I was a bit bored by the plot summaries of stories I can't obtain. But in the case of books I've read, I enjoyed the detailed analyses given by the authors. No doubt different readers will react differently to this aspect of the biography.

The Life of Irène Némirovsky reads like history as well as biography. It paints a frightening picture of the persecution of the Jews in the twentieth century, from the pogroms in Russia to Hitler's Final Solution for France.

I consider this biography something of a reference book that I'll probably revisit as I continue to read Irène Némirovsky's fiction. I recommend it to readers who wish to read Némirovsky in the context of her times and her experience.
ZEr0
Well written book although many facts about Irene's life have already been known to me.
Dynen
Irina Nemirovsky was born in Kiev in 1903, the daughter of Leonid, a Jewish self-made banker, and of Anna, a cold and censorious mother whom Irina hated and whom she would portray mercilessly in several of her novels. The child suffered dreadfully from asthma in that blossom-laden city. From the time she was three years old, the family would travel every winter to the spa towns of France (Anna was devoted to all things French), where her parents would leave her with a beloved French governess (recruited in Kiev), to be treated for her asthma, while they lived it up on the Côte d'Azur. The little girl loved France, soon spoke French fluently and conversed in that language with her mother.

There were frequent pogroms in Ukraine, and the one in 1905 even reached the prosperous area of the city where the Nemirovsky family was living. In 1914 the family moved to St Petersburg, a city less liable to pogroms and where Leonid's wealth continued to grow; and the war made him richer still. But then the Bolsheviks seized power; all the banks were taken over; drunken mobs were likely to attack any bourgeois (I have never read elsewhere of the ubiquitous raids on wine-shops and wine-cellars), and the Nemirovsky family fled to Finland in January 1918. After a while there, they moved on to Sweden, and then finally, in 1919 to Paris, where a branch of Leonid's bank in Russia still existed, so they were not exactly penniless refugees. The circle of émigré Russians in Paris is very well described (as is the social and political background throughout the book).

Irène went to the Sorbonne, where she studied Russian literature (she had previously read mainly French literature). Up to then she had written mainly poetry for her own entertainment; now she began to write prose, generally full of sardonic observations, anticipating the quality of so many of her later novels. In 1921, at the age of eighteen, she had the first of these pieces published in a bawdy magazine. That this publication was also fashionably antisemitic would not have troubled Irène, who was herself very critical of Jewish characteristics. In 1923 she published a story which has the kind of description of ghetto Jews that could be found in antisemitic literature. Because she matches the description of the ghetto Jews with equally ugly ones of antisemitic officers and Russian drunks, Philipponnat acquits her of expressing a judgment on them. (I cannot go along with him when he writes, of another of her books, "Irène Némirovsky was a novelist, not a preacher." I think there is never any doubt of the values she held and wanted to convey.) Like her mother, Irène could not help being haunted, with a shudder, by her ancestral roots. The portrayal in her books of wealthy Jews, obsessed with making money, is equally unpleasant. And she is driven to write about such Jews in very many of her stories.

She threw herself into the life of the giddy "Roaring Twenties". But that stopped in 1926 when she married Michel Epstein, the son of an emigré Russian Jewish banker, but only a poorly paid bank employee.

Her breakthrough as a novelist came with the publication of "David Golder" in 1930, and its reception is discussed at length. It had 125 reprints within a year, and there are many pages about its adaptation for the theatre (a flop) and for one of the earliest talking films (a great success.)

Despite her fame and her sponsors, her applications for French citizenship from 1935 onwards were unsuccessful: the French were by this time worried about the influx of so many foreigners, especially of Jews. But she did convert to Catholicism early in 1939, as did her husband and their two young daughters. Was it an attempt to escape antisemitism? Was the reason the distaste she had shown in her books for both rich and poor Jews? Or was it a genuine spiritual search?

Shortly before, in 1938, she had found an idyllic market town, Issy-l'Évêque, in Burgundy, which represented to her the true France and to which she returned over and over again. Just before the end of the Phoney War in 1940, at the same time as her last book about Jews ("The Dogs and the Wolves", the last to be published in her life-time) was issued, she began work on "All Our Worldly Goods", the first of her novels about provincial France during the First World War and the period that led up to the Second World War.

She was in Issy when the German troops arrived in June 1940, and the reports of roads crammed with fugitives inspired the first part of "Suite Française", which was also a panorama of a flawed French society. Its second part portrays a community like Issy under a still quite mild German occupation. So does another novel, "Fire in the Blood". And in "The Fires of Autumn" she describes inter-war France perverted by her enduring theme, the love of money.

The family had to register as Jews; some publishers cancelled their contracts with her; another accepted some stories which appeared under a pseudonym; but most of the stories she wrote at the time were published only after the war. The German authorities demanded that royalties of Jewish writers had to be paid into a blocked account. Irène's husband Michel was dismissed by his bank. Very little money was coming in. Yet, with all those worries, she was still enormously productive in those last two years before her arrest on 13 July 1942. Michel and their two daughters were arrested on 6 October. Amazingly, a German officer gave the girls 48 hours to get away (with a suitcase which contained the manuscript of "Suite Française"). Michel and Irène had long ago made arrangements for a friend to look after the girls if their parents were arrested, and this woman hid them until the Liberation. Both parents died in Auschwitz.

Némirovsky has left various notebooks and memoirs of her life, and her novels have a strong autobiographical elements. Her descriptions are always extremely striking, and Philipponnat quotes many of them, adding enormously to the pleasure the book gives. But when they come from novels, it seems to me that Philipponnat sometimes takes them at face value. Even if the only slightly disguised characters in the novels are often based on Némirovsky's perception of, for example, her parents and are written with all the passionate feelings that she had about them, can we take these as true images of what her parents were really like? Perhaps they were; but Philipponnat does not raise this question, and seems to see her parents entirely through Irène's eyes.

When writing about of Némirovsky's books and of their reception, Philipponnat will make many references to French, Russian, German (and English) stories with which hers can be compared or to passages which might have inspired her. Few English readers will know of these writings. Besides, if they have not read her books, many of the lengthy comments about them will be difficult to understand. All this makes the second half of the book quite hard going; but Irène's character comes out strongly, and that makes the effort worth while.

(See my Amazon reviews of David Golder, The Misunderstanding, The Dogs and the Wolves, All Our Wordly Goods, Suite Française.)
The Life of Irne Nmirovsky: 1903-1942. Olivier Philipponnat, Patrick Lienhardt download epub
Author: Olivier Philipponnat
ISBN: 0099523981
Category: No category
Language: English
Publisher: Vintage Books USA; 2nd Edition edition (March 1, 2011)
Pages: 480 pages